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Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tively rested. The Foot cavalry were in light marching order, and were accompanied only by a limited ordnance train and a few ambulances. Three days cooked rations were issued and duly deposited in haversacks, much of which was thrown away in the first few hours' march, the men preferring green corn, seasoned by rubbing the meat rations upon the ears, and the turnips and apples found contiguous to their route. After the sun sank to rest on that hot August day, Jackson went into bivouac at Salem, a small village on the Manassas Gap Railroad, having marched in the heat and dust twenty-six miles. But one man among twenty thousand knew where they were going. The troops knew an important movement was on hand, which involved contact with the enemy, and possibly a reissue of supplies. At early dawn the next day the march was resumed at right angles to the course of the day before, following the Manassas Gap Railroad and passing through Bull Run Mountains at Thoroughfare Gap. At Gaines
Upton's Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d that General Pope was entirely defeated and was falling back to Washington in confusion, and McClellan reports that Mr. Lincoln told him he regarded Washington as lost, and asked him to consent to accept command of all the forces, to which McClellan replied that he would stake his life to save the city, but that Halleck and the President said it would, in their judgment, be impossible to do that. General McClellan having accepted command, on September 2d rode out in the direction of Upton's Hill to meet Pope's army and direct them to their respective positions in the line of the Washington defenses. He met Pope and McDowell riding toward Washington, escorted by cavalry, when the former asked if he had any objection to McDowell and himself going to Washington; to which McClellan replied: No, but. I am going in the direction of the firing. Lee's military plans had been wisely conceived, and the tactical details splendidly executed by his officers and men. Only three months had
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
which was handsomely done. Pope claims that Jackson's movement was known, and that he reported it and then move with his victorious legions on Jackson; the other to hold Longstreet apart from Jack Jackson on the 27th. At sunset of that day Jackson's command was still eating, sleeping, and resintention to concentrate on Manassas. One of Jackson's division commanders writes that the messeng gray fell dead almost in each other's arms. Jackson's loss was heavy. Ewell and Taliaferro were nd, left the Rapidan on the 26th and followed Jackson's route. A little before dark on the 28th heitz John Porter were marching so as to get in Jackson's right and rear. The Federal attack had bee pike, while he assaulted with his right wing Jackson's left. His first impression in the morning z Lee, which, having left Manassas the day of Jackson's arrival there, had penetrated the country as of the enemy. General D. H. Hill was under Jackson's command. When the latter received Special [9 more...]
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
marching away from Manassas: A. P. Hill to Centreville, Ewell to the crossing of Bull Run at Black the Warrenton turnpike in the direction of Centreville, where they hoped to find him, and at the sle Pope was following his supposed route to Centreville, Jackson in his war paint was in line beyon Buckland, in getting the order to march to Centreville had to pass without knowing it in front of l he could get up Heintzelman and Reno from Centreville, and Porter, with King's division, from Bri badly defeated, and that night withdrew to Centreville, having lost, since he left the Rappahannoc 31st his army was posted on the heights of Centreville. Halleck telegraphed him on that day from pe had received decided General Lee to turn Centreville by moving to Pope's right and striking his this movement was perceived Pope abandoned Centreville. Hooker was immediately ordered to Fairfax positions. The very next day, however, at Centreville, he wires Halleck that his troops were in p[4 more...]
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d march into western Maryland. Having received the approval of the Southern President to this plan, he immediately proceeded to put it into execution. First, because he believed if he could win a decisive victory the fall of Washington and Baltimore would follow, with far-reaching results. Second, because it would relieve Virginia and the Confederate quartermasters and commissary departments at Richmond of the support of his army for a time. Third, because it was hoped that large accessiryland in the Confederate army were splendid soldiers, enthusiastic in the cause, and brave in battle; and they knew, as the Southern commander did, that a battle fought and won in western Maryland, followed by a rapid march in the direction of Baltimore and Washington, would be attended with immense results, and that nothing would be accomplished, so far as Maryland was concerned, till then. Much curiosity existed in that State to see the victors of the first Manassas, the Seven Days Battles
South Mountain, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
The time had arrived for the Federal army to advance, but no commander had been assigned to take the field with it. Halleck had intimated that McClellan would not be allowed to have it. The latter has stated that he was expressly told that no commander had been selected, but that he determined to solve the question for himself, so left his cards at the White House and War Department with P. P. C. written upon them, and then went to the field. That he fought the battles of Antietam and South Mountain with a halter around his neck. If he had been defeated and had survived, he would have been tried for assuming authority without orders, and probably been condemned to death. There is no doubt that at that time much dissatisfaction existed in the Federal councils with McClellan. His great personal popularity with his troops, the threatened safety of Washington, and the difficulty of finding a suitable successor, all combined to produce a negative acquiescence in his assuming command o
Frederick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
is cause in Maryland. Accordingly, the heads of his columns were turned toward the Potomac, and on September 5th successfully crossed that river and advanced to Frederick, where he established himself behind the Monocacy. He had been joined by the divisions of McLaws and D. H. Hill, which had been left at Richmond, but many of hi it was demonstrated that it could seize and hold their territory. They were not prepared to leave their homes and accompany the army back to Virginia. Near Frederick, on September 8th, General Lee issued a proclamation to the people of Maryland in accordance with the suggestion of President Davis, who wrote him that it was usto welcome you to your natural position among them, they will only welcome you when you come of your own free-will. Lee's crossing the Potomac and marching to Frederick relieved the Federal authorities from their immediate anxiety about the safety of their capital. As he had supposed, they determined to send an army after him,
Gainsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
lem, a small village on the Manassas Gap Railroad, having marched in the heat and dust twenty-six miles. But one man among twenty thousand knew where they were going. The troops knew an important movement was on hand, which involved contact with the enemy, and possibly a reissue of supplies. At early dawn the next day the march was resumed at right angles to the course of the day before, following the Manassas Gap Railroad and passing through Bull Run Mountains at Thoroughfare Gap. At Gainesville, Stuart, with Robertson and Fitz Lee's brigades of cavalry, overtook Jackson, whose subsequent movements were greatly aided and influenced by the admirable manner in which the cavalry was employed and managed by Stuart. On reaching the vicinity of Manassas Junction, his objective point, Jackson inclined to the right and intersected the main railroad in Pope's rear at Bristoe Station, four miles closer to Pope, where he halted for the night, having marched nearly thirty miles. That night
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ty miles above Washington, and march into western Maryland. Having received the approval of the from those who sympathized with his cause in Maryland. Accordingly, the heads of his columns were rn feeling had been overawed and kept down in Maryland for so long a time by Federal occupation thatal Lee issued a proclamation to the people of Maryland in accordance with the suggestion of Presidenhe determination of the boundary line between Maryland and Virginia has been attended with much expely ascertained, because, as a talented son of Maryland put it, there is no real division between them. The acquisition of Maryland would have added a bright star to the Southern constellation; but foy recruits added to Lee's army. The sons of Maryland in the Confederate army were splendid soldiernder did, that a battle fought and won in western Maryland, followed by a rapid march in the directithat nothing would be accomplished, so far as Maryland was concerned, till then. Much curiosity exi
Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
fax Court House. As soon as this movement was perceived Pope abandoned Centreville. Hooker was immediately ordered to Fairfax Court House to take up a line on the Little River pike to prevent Lee's troops getting in his rear at the point where it joins the Warrenton pike, the movement to be supported by the rest of his army. As his troops reached the vicinity of Fairfax Court House, Jackson determined to attack them, and moved at once upon the force which had been posted on a ridge near Germantown for the purpose of driving them before him, so he could be in a position to command the pike from Centreville to Alexandria, down which Pope's troops must pass on their retreat. A sanguinary battle ensued just before sunset, terminated by darkness. The battle of Oxhill, as it was called, was fought in the midst of a thunderstorm. Longstreet's troops came on the field toward its conclusion. The loss on both sides was heavy, the Federals losing two of their best generals, Kearny and Ste
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