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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History. Search the whole document.

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Island Grove (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
same methods that in backwoods districts prevail even to our day: personal visits and solicitations, attendance at various kinds of neighborhood gatherings, such as raisings of new cabins, horse-races, shooting-matches, sales of town lots or of personal property under execution, or whatever occasion served to call a dozen or two of the settlers together. One recorded incident illustrates the practical nature of the politician's art at that day: He [Lincoln] came to my house, near Island Grove, during harvest; There were some thirty men in the field. He got his dinner and went out in the field where the men were at work. I gave him an introduction, and the boys said that they could not vote for a man unless he could make a hand. Well, boys, said he, if that is all, I am sure of your votes. He took hold of the cradle, and led the way all the round with perfect ease. The boys were satisfied, and I don't think he lost a vote in the crowd. Sometimes two or more candidates
lified deputies, and when he became acquainted with Lincoln, and learned his attainments and aptitudes, and the estimation in which he was held by the people of New Salem, he wisely concluded to utilize his talents and standing, notwithstanding their difference in politics. The incident is thus recorded by Lincoln: The surveyor of Sangamon offered to depute to Abraham that portion of his work which was within his part of the county. He accepted, procured a compass and chain, studied Flint and Gibson a little, and went at it. This procured bread, and kept soul and body together. Tradition has it that Calhoun not only gave him the appointment, but lent him the book in which to study the art, which he accomplished in a period of six weeks, aided by the schoolmaster, Mentor Graham. The exact period of this increase in knowledge and business capacity is not recorded, but it must have taken place in the summer of 1833, as there exists a certificate of survey in Lincoln's handw
uties, and when he became acquainted with Lincoln, and learned his attainments and aptitudes, and the estimation in which he was held by the people of New Salem, he wisely concluded to utilize his talents and standing, notwithstanding their difference in politics. The incident is thus recorded by Lincoln: The surveyor of Sangamon offered to depute to Abraham that portion of his work which was within his part of the county. He accepted, procured a compass and chain, studied Flint and Gibson a little, and went at it. This procured bread, and kept soul and body together. Tradition has it that Calhoun not only gave him the appointment, but lent him the book in which to study the art, which he accomplished in a period of six weeks, aided by the schoolmaster, Mentor Graham. The exact period of this increase in knowledge and business capacity is not recorded, but it must have taken place in the summer of 1833, as there exists a certificate of survey in Lincoln's handwriting sign
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 3
procured bread, and kept soul and body together. Tradition has it that Calhoun not only gave him the appointment, but lent him the book in which to study the art, which he accomplished in a period of six weeks, aided by the schoolmaster, Mentor Graham. The exact period of this increase in knowledge and business capacity is not recorded, but it must have taken place in the summer of 1833, as there exists a certificate of survey in Lincoln's handwriting signed, J. Calhoun, S. S. C., by A. Lincoln, dated January 14, 1834. Before June of that year he had surveyed and located a public road from Musick's Ferry on Salt Creek, via New Salem, to the county line in the direction to Jacksonville, twenty-six miles and seventy chains in length, the exact course of which survey, with detailed bearings and distances, was drawn on common white letter-paper pasted in a long slip, to a scale of two inches to the mile, in ordinary yet clear and distinct penmanship. The compensation he received fo
Dan Stone (search for this): chapter 3
ng that the right of property in slaves is secured to the slaveholding States by the Federal Constitution, together with other phraseology calculated on the whole to soothe and comfort pro-slavery sentiment. After much irritating discussion, the committee's resolutions were finally passed, with but Lincoln and five others voting in the negative. No record remains whether or not Lincoln joined in the debate; but, to leave no doubt upon his exact position and feeling, he and his colleague, Dan Stone, caused the following protest to be formally entered on the journals of the House: Resolutions upon the subject of domestic slavery having passed both branches of the General Assembly at its present session, the undersigned hereby protest against the passage of the same. They believe that the institution of slavery is founded on both injustice and bad policy, but that the promulgation of abolition doctrines tends rather to increase than abate its evils. They believe that the
A. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 3
andidate for Speaker in 1838 and 1840 When Lincoln was appointed postmaster, in May, 1833, the L deputies, and when he became acquainted with Lincoln, and learned his attainments and aptitudes, a3, as there exists a certificate of survey in Lincoln's handwriting signed, J. Calhoun, S. S. C., bt election of 1834, and near the end of April Lincoln published his announcement that he would agaie representatives chosen stood: Dawson, 1390; Lincoln, 1376; Carpenter, 1170; Stuart, 1164. The lohe race. It must be frankly admitted that Lincoln's success at this juncture was one of the mose Lincoln was captain, and who, together with Lincoln, had reenlisted as a private in the Independeleading States in the Mississippi valley. Of Lincoln's share in that legislation, it need only be e negative. No record remains whether or not Lincoln joined in the debate; but, to leave no doubt In view of the great scope and quality of Lincoln's public service in after life, it would be a[9 more...]
rtheless underwent a severe political struggle in which, about four years after her admission into the Union, politicians and settlers from the South made a determined effort to change her to a slave State. The legislature of 1822-23, with a two-thirds pro-slavery majority of the State Senate, and a technical, but legally questionable, two-thirds majority in the House, submitted to popular vote an act calling a State convention to change the constitution. It happened, fortunately, that Governor Coles, though a Virginian, was strongly antislavery, and gave the weight of his official influence and his whole four years salary to counteract the dangerous scheme. From the fact that southern Illinois up to that time was mostly peopled from the slave States, the result was seriously in doubt through an active and exciting campaign, and the convention was finally defeated by a majority of eighteen hundred in a total vote of eleven thousand six hundred and twelve. While this result effectua
Elijah P. Lovejoy (search for this): chapter 3
through an active and exciting campaign, and the convention was finally defeated by a majority of eighteen hundred in a total vote of eleven thousand six hundred and twelve. While this result effectually decided that Illinois would remain a free State, the propagandism and reorganization left a deep and tenacious undercurrent of pro-slavery opinion that for many years manifested itself in vehement and intolerant outcries against abolitionism, which on one occasion caused the murder of Elijah P. Lovejoy for persisting in his right to print an antislavery newspaper at Alton. Nearly a year before this tragedy the Illinois legislature had under consideration certain resolutions from the Eastern States on the subject of slavery, and the committee to which they had been referred reported a set of resolves highly disapproving abolition societies, holding that the right of property in slaves is secured to the slaveholding States by the Federal Constitution, together with other phraseolo
John T. Stuart (search for this): chapter 3
Those cast .for the representatives chosen stood: Dawson, 1390; Lincoln, 1376; Carpenter, 1170; Stuart, 1164. The location of the State capital had also been submitted to popular vote at this electi encouragement and promise of most valuable help. One of the four successful candidates was John T. Stuart, who had been major of volunteers in the Black Hawk War while Lincoln was captain, and who, being fellow-candidates and both belonging to the Whig party. Mr. Lincoln relates: Major John T. Stuart, then in full practice of the law [at Springfield], was also elected. During the canvassrivate conversation he encouraged Abraham to study law. After the election, he borrowed books of Stuart, took them home with him, and went at it in good earnest. He studied with nobody. In the auicense, and on April 15, 1837, removed to Springfield and commenced the practice, his old friend Stuart taking him into partnership. From and after this election in 1834 as a representative, Linco
Mentor Graham (search for this): chapter 3
us recorded by Lincoln: The surveyor of Sangamon offered to depute to Abraham that portion of his work which was within his part of the county. He accepted, procured a compass and chain, studied Flint and Gibson a little, and went at it. This procured bread, and kept soul and body together. Tradition has it that Calhoun not only gave him the appointment, but lent him the book in which to study the art, which he accomplished in a period of six weeks, aided by the schoolmaster, Mentor Graham. The exact period of this increase in knowledge and business capacity is not recorded, but it must have taken place in the summer of 1833, as there exists a certificate of survey in Lincoln's handwriting signed, J. Calhoun, S. S. C., by A. Lincoln, dated January 14, 1834. Before June of that year he had surveyed and located a public road from Musick's Ferry on Salt Creek, via New Salem, to the county line in the direction to Jacksonville, twenty-six miles and seventy chains in length,
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