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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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W. B. Curtis (search for this): chapter 156
cers of my regiment, return to each their sincerest thanks. Respectfully submitted. Morton C. Hunter, Colonel Eighty-second Regt. Indiana Vol. Infty. Capt. W. B. Curtis, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Eighty-Second Regt. Indiana Vol. Infty., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. Captain: Mcommunications. On the evening of the 31st my regiment, with the Thirty-first and Eighty-ninth Ohio and Seventy-fifth Indiana, all under my command, aided by Captains Curtis, Whedon, and Grosvenor, of Colonel Walker's staff, moved and occupied the railroad at what is known as Morrow's, or Chapman's, Station, which I believe was thich the troops have been handled and the campaign conducted, which has resulted in the most brilliant achievement ever won by American arms. All of which is respectfully submitted. Morton C. Hunter, Colonel Eighty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Capt. W. B. Curtis, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps.
Jefferson C. Davis (search for this): chapter 156
ced our advance upon Atlanta, meeting with serious resistance in crossing Peach Tree Creek, a small but deep stream with difficult banks. On the evening of the 19th my regiment and the Eighty-ninth Ohio were sent to support the Third Brigade, of Davis' division, of our corps, in forcing a crossing of that creek, which was accomplished after a very severe fight, in which Davis' brigade suffered terribly, but fortunately my regiment escaped almost unharmed, 3 men only being wounded; yet the firiDavis' brigade suffered terribly, but fortunately my regiment escaped almost unharmed, 3 men only being wounded; yet the firing was very heavy, but upon my part of the line they mostly overshot us. The names of the wounded appear in the list. The next day was spent in advancing our lines and fortifying. Toward evening heavy fighting was heard on our left. The attack was intended for our corps, but they struck the line too far to our left and encountered Hooker's, Howard's, and one brigade of Johnson's forces, where they got most decently thrashed. On the night of the 21st the enemy again fell back, and on the ne
Richard W. Johnson (search for this): chapter 156
rudent to attempt to take it by storm. On the morning of the 12th we moved with the residue of our corps to a position near Resaca, Ga., by the way of Snake Creek Gap. On the 13th we moved and took position in line of battle to the left of General Johnson's division, of our corps. On the 14th we advanced our lines under a heavy skirmish fire until we reached a point about threequarters of a mile from the rebel fortifications, which were some two miles north of Resaca. While here General Juay was spent in advancing our lines and fortifying. Toward evening heavy fighting was heard on our left. The attack was intended for our corps, but they struck the line too far to our left and encountered Hooker's, Howard's, and one brigade of Johnson's forces, where they got most decently thrashed. On the night of the 21st the enemy again fell back, and on the next morning it was officially stated in camp that Atlanta was evacuated. We moved upon the place with high hopes and firm step, bu
Oliver O. Howard (search for this): chapter 156
y severe fight, in which Davis' brigade suffered terribly, but fortunately my regiment escaped almost unharmed, 3 men only being wounded; yet the firing was very heavy, but upon my part of the line they mostly overshot us. The names of the wounded appear in the list. The next day was spent in advancing our lines and fortifying. Toward evening heavy fighting was heard on our left. The attack was intended for our corps, but they struck the line too far to our left and encountered Hooker's, Howard's, and one brigade of Johnson's forces, where they got most decently thrashed. On the night of the 21st the enemy again fell back, and on the next morning it was officially stated in camp that Atlanta was evacuated. We moved upon the place with high hopes and firm step, but when within some three miles of there it was ascertained that it was all a ruse of the enemy; that they still held the place, but had so managed as to make some of our superior officers believe that they had left, that
tion, except the Twentieth Corps, which fell back and occupied the crossings of the Chattahoochee River in strong works, the grand object of our move being to strike the Macon and Atlanta Railroad and sever the enemy's communications. On the evening of the 31st my regiment, with the Thirty-first and Eighty-ninth Ohio and Seventy-fifth Indiana, all under my command, aided by Captains Curtis, Whedon, and Grosvenor, of Colonel Walker's staff, moved and occupied the railroad at what is known as Morrow's, or Chapman's, Station, which I believe was the first point at which the road was reached. When we advanced the position was held by rebel cavalry, but they soon gave way before our skirmish line, which was under command of Major Jolly, of the Eighty-ninth Ohio. We spent the night in fortifying our position on the road, which was in the form of a square, one regiment being placed on each side. The works were made very strong and would have withstood a heavy and prolonged fight. We rem
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 156
with the grand army of the Division of the Mississippi, composed of three departments, to wit, the Department of the Cumberland, the Department of the Tennessee, and the Department of the Ohio, to attack the rebel army under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, then occupying the town of Dalton, Ga., strongly intrenched. After some circuitous marches and slight skirmishing with the enemy, on the evening of the 9th of May we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost Gap, some six miles distant from Dis works. The next morning we moved out in pursuit and camped for the night at Resaca, unable to go farther in consequence of the bridge across the river at that point being destroyed. From thence we proceeded with the grand army in pursuit of Johnston's retreating forces, frequently skirmishing with him, and often forming lines of battle either to advance for the purpose of attacking him or receiving an attack from him, until May 24, at which time we were some ten miles beyond the Etowah Rive
John B. Turchin (search for this): chapter 156
thanks. When we started on the campaign we had 328 effective men and officers; we have lost in killed and wounded up to the 6th of this month, 39. Nominal list (omitted) shows 1 officer and 5 men killed, 2 officers and 31 men wounded. We had at that date but about 200 men for duty. The loss over and above the 39 were those that became exhausted in the fatigue of the march and were back in hospital sick. Our brigade was commanded from the beginning of the campaign to July 15 by Brig. Gen. John B. Turchin, since by Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. For the efficient manner in which they have conducted the management of the brigade, and the gallantry displayed by each in the handling of his troops upon the field of danger, I, in behalf of the men and officers of my regiment, return to each their sincerest thanks. Respectfully submitted. Morton C. Hunter, Colonel Eighty-second Regt. Indiana Vol. Infty. Capt. W. B. Curtis, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1s
Moses B. Walker (search for this): chapter 156
. The loss over and above the 39 were those that became exhausted in the fatigue of the march and were back in hospital sick. Our brigade was commanded from the beginning of the campaign to July 15 by Brig. Gen. John B. Turchin, since by Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. For the efficient manner in which they have conducted the management of the brigade, and the gallantry displayed by each in the handling of his troops upon the field of danger, I, in behalf d Atlanta Railroad and sever the enemy's communications. On the evening of the 31st my regiment, with the Thirty-first and Eighty-ninth Ohio and Seventy-fifth Indiana, all under my command, aided by Captains Curtis, Whedon, and Grosvenor, of Colonel Walker's staff, moved and occupied the railroad at what is known as Morrow's, or Chapman's, Station, which I believe was the first point at which the road was reached. When we advanced the position was held by rebel cavalry, but they soon gave way
Michael E. Bunger (search for this): chapter 156
account of the part taken by my regiment in the great campaign for Atlanta to that date, but as the movements since have been but a continuation of those then in progress, I shall commence where I then left off and give a general summary of the part taken by my command to the present time. On the next day, to wit, August 7, my regiment, still occupying the front line southwest of the city, furnished all the pickets for one brigade, to wit, fifty-five in number, under command of First Lieut. Michael E. Bunger, Company F. On the same day the picket-line was ordered to be advanced, and I was directed to furnish fifty additional men from my regiment to support the line, which I did, and sent them out under command of Second Lieuts. E. J. Robinson, Company B, and J. K. McIlhenny, Company D. In advancing the line my men were exposed to a most deadly fire, the enemy being strongly intrenched ihi rifle-pits, but they accomplished their work without faltering, driving the enemy into his mai
Morgan Jordan (search for this): chapter 156
nder my command, were sent out to the front in conjunction with the Second Brigade of our division, on a reconnaissance to ascertain the distance to and strength of the enemy's works. The duty was accomplished under heavy fire, and with considerable loss to some of the regiments. In mine but 1 man was hurt, to wit, John H. Sexton, Company H, badly stunned with a shell. On the 5th we were moved to a new position on the front line, and again had to fortify under heavy fire. On this day Morgan Jordan, Company C, was wounded. From the time we left Ringgold to the 6th of this month (when General Palmer, our corps commander was relieved) we have never been out of range of the, enemy's guns. During all that time the men and officers have been exposed to the rain and dust which, under a tropical sun, have been almost beyond the powers of human endurance; yet all believing that they were engaged in the most sacred and just cause upon earth, have marched, worked, and fought without a sing
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