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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
he enemy, occupying nearly the same position in the trenches. June 5, the One hundred and twenty-fifth having been on picket during the night advanced as skirmishers at daybreak and found that the enemy had evacuated his works. June 6, moved at 6 a. m. eight miles toward the railroad and bivouacked at 4 p. m. near Lost Mountain. June 7, 8, and 9, remained in same place, men washing and resting. June 10, marched at 11 a. m. through mud and rain three miles and confronted the enemy near Pine Mountain. June 11, occupied in getting into positions, rain falling in such quantities as almost to prevent operations. June 12 and 13, active operations are suspended on account of excessive wet weather. June 14. regiment on picket, nothing of importance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works. June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. Jun
Lost Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
e enemy was kept up. during the day. May 29, 30, and 31, regiment lay in the trenches. From the 1st to the 4th of June, inclusive, the regiment was constantly under fire of the enemy, occupying nearly the same position in the trenches. June 5, the One hundred and twenty-fifth having been on picket during the night advanced as skirmishers at daybreak and found that the enemy had evacuated his works. June 6, moved at 6 a. m. eight miles toward the railroad and bivouacked at 4 p. m. near Lost Mountain. June 7, 8, and 9, remained in same place, men washing and resting. June 10, marched at 11 a. m. through mud and rain three miles and confronted the enemy near Pine Mountain. June 11, occupied in getting into positions, rain falling in such quantities as almost to prevent operations. June 12 and 13, active operations are suspended on account of excessive wet weather. June 14. regiment on picket, nothing of importance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two
Euharlee Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
ee miles southeast of Kingston, where we were allowed to remain, the men resting, washing clothes, &c., during the 21st and 22d ultimo. As every available team was ordered into the supply train, baggage was sent to the rear and the regiment was restricted to one team during the remainder of the campaign. May 23, marched at 12 m., leaving the enemy to our left, crossed the Etowah River shortly after dusk, and bivouacked two miles farther on at 8 p. m. May 24, moved at 8 a. m., crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill, passed through Stilesborough, and bivouacked at dusk, after a march of thirteen miles under a scorching sun. May 25, moved to within one and a half miles of Dallas, and bivouacked in such position as to support the Twentieth Army Corps, which had engaged the enemy in strong force, and suffered a repulse during the afternoon. May 26, Companies B, F, G, H, and K were placed on picket, and the remainder of the regiment stood to arms during the day and threw up breastwork
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
deployed and advanced with great determination, drove the enemy from his pits, but received such a severe fire from his main works as to be unable to hold the ground gained. Capt. Sterling Manchester and 2 men were killed, and 12 men were wounded. Strengthened our advanced works at night. June 24, remained in position as support to the picket-line. June 25 and 26, were in rear line of trenches, resting. June 27, it having been determined to charge the enemy's works to the right of Kenesaw Mountain, the Third Brigade was designated to form one of the charging columns to assault the enemy in front of works occupied by the extreme right of the Fourth Army Corps, Colonel Opdycke, in charge of the skirmish line for the division, selected the One hundred and twenty-fifth for skirmishers, ordering that it should push ahead at all hazards, scaling the enemy's works with the head of the column, in case the charge was successful, or protecting the rear if repulsed. I deployed the regimen
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
tion in rear of the front line, and threw up strong earth-works. May 16, the enemy evacuated during the night. The One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at daylight, passed through Resaca at 9.30 a. m.. pressed the enemy closely, and bivouacked at dark near Calhoun. May 17, recommenced pursuit at 7.30 a. m., and moved forward rapidly till 5 p. m., when a brisk skirmish ensued with the enemy's rear guard, which lasted till after dark. May 18, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to Adairsville, rested till 1 p. m., marched three miles toward Kingston, and bivouacked, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers having captured 4 prisoners during the day. May 19, marched two and a half miles beyond Kingston, encountered the enemy in force, and rested on arms during the night. May 20, went into camp three miles southeast of Kingston, where we were allowed to remain, the men resting, washing clothes, &c., during the 21st and 22d ultimo. As every available team was ordered
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
ance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works. June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. June 18, the lines are extended, the One hundred and twenty-fifth moves a short distance to the right and fortifies. June 19, the enemy having evacuated during last night, our lines are advanced two miles, when we again encountered him at the base of Kenesaw, on the northeast side of the mountain. Heavy cannonading is opened. Lieut. Freeman Collins is killed by a fragment of shell, 2 men are wounded. Threw up strong works at night. June 20, the brigade being relieved by a brigade of the Fourteenth Army Corps, at dark the regiment marched one mile to the rear and bivouacked in open field. June 21, moved half a mile to the right, relieving Twentieth Army Corps in the trenches. At 4 p. m. advanced our lines 400 yards and fortified. June 22,
Nancys Creek (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire command moved at 5 a. m.; the One hundred and twenty-fifth was deployed as skirmishers, and was supported by the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Ohio, and Third Kentucky Infantry. Encountered Wheeler's cavalry, dismounted, supported by a 4-gun battery. At 9 a. m. at Nancy's Creek charged him from his temporary intrenchments and drove him six miles, bivouacking early in tLe afternoon at Buck Head. Lost during the day 1 man killed and 5 wounded. July 19, remain in bivouac. July 20, marched at 6 a. m., crossed Peach Tree Creek at 12 m. and assisted in repulsing a severe attack of the enemy, which resulted very disastrously to him. July 21, rested in bivouac. July 22, marched at 10 a. m. and drove the enemy into his intrenchrrents about Atlanta after severe skirmi
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
ply train, baggage was sent to the rear and the regiment was restricted to one team during the remainder of the campaign. May 23, marched at 12 m., leaving the enemy to our left, crossed the Etowah River shortly after dusk, and bivouacked two miles farther on at 8 p. m. May 24, moved at 8 a. m., crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill, passed through Stilesborough, and bivouacked at dusk, after a march of thirteen miles under a scorching sun. May 25, moved to within one and a half miles of Dallas, and bivouacked in such position as to support the Twentieth Army Corps, which had engaged the enemy in strong force, and suffered a repulse during the afternoon. May 26, Companies B, F, G, H, and K were placed on picket, and the remainder of the regiment stood to arms during the day and threw up breastworks at night. May 27, the regiment remained behind works until 7 p. m., when it was ordered on picket. May 28, on picket; a continual firing with the enemy was kept up. during the day. Ma
Calhoun, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
rely wounded), to the 8th day of September, 1864, when it went into camp near Atlanta, Ga., at the close of the summer's campaign: May 15, the regiment having been heavily engaged yesterday, retired to a commanding position in rear of the front line, and threw up strong earth-works. May 16, the enemy evacuated during the night. The One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at daylight, passed through Resaca at 9.30 a. m.. pressed the enemy closely, and bivouacked at dark near Calhoun. May 17, recommenced pursuit at 7.30 a. m., and moved forward rapidly till 5 p. m., when a brisk skirmish ensued with the enemy's rear guard, which lasted till after dark. May 18, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to Adairsville, rested till 1 p. m., marched three miles toward Kingston, and bivouacked, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers having captured 4 prisoners during the day. May 19, marched two and a half miles beyond Kingston, encountered the enemy in force, and rested on ar
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 56
rom the 14th day of May, when I took command (Colonel Opdycke having been severely wounded), to the 8th day of September, 1864, when it went into camp near Atlanta, Ga., at the close of the summer's campaign: May 15, the regiment having been heavily engaged yesterday, retired to a commanding position in rear of the front line, and threw up strong earth-works. May 16, the enemy evacuated during the night. The One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at daylight, passed through Resaca at 9.30 a. m.. pressed the enemy closely, and bivouacked at dark near Calhoun. May 17, recommenced pursuit at 7.30 a. m., and moved forward rapidly till 5 p. m., when a brisk skirmish ensued with the enemy's rear guard, which lasted till after dark. May 18, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to Adairsville, rested till 1 p. m., marched three miles toward Kingston, and bivouacked, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers having captured 4 prisoners during the day. May 19, marched two and a
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