hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 380 4 Browse Search
George A. Custer 306 6 Browse Search
Wesley Merritt 277 7 Browse Search
George Crook 241 7 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 229 3 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 197 5 Browse Search
Alfred T. A. Torbert 174 6 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 159 3 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 155 7 Browse Search
G. G. Meade 146 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. Search the whole document.

Found 956 total hits in 315 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
y could not, a number of troops sufficient to crush me might be detached by Lee, moved rapidly by rail, and, after overwhelming me, be quickly returned to confront General Meade. I was moreover, that my transportation could not supply me further than Harrisonburg, and if in penetrating the Blue Ridge I met with protracted resistance, a lack of supplies might compel me to abandon the attempt at a most inopportune time. I therefore advised that the Valley campaign be terminated north of Staunton, and I be permitted to return, carrying out on the way my original instructions for desolating the Shenandoah country so as to make it untenable for permanent occupation by the Confederates. I proposed to detach the bulk of my army when this work of destruction was completed, and send it by way of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad through Washington to the Petersburg line, believing that I could move it more rapidly by that route than by any other. I was confident that if a movement of this
Back River, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
es farther north and west, near Tumbling Run. In the night Custer was ordered to retrace his steps before daylight by the Back road, which is parallel to and about three males from the Valley pike, and attack the enemy at Tom's Brook crossing, whilelonel Thoburn, who had been pushed out toward Strasburg from Crook's command, and also Custer's division of cavalry on the Back road. As afterward appeared, this attack was made in the belief that all of my troops but Crook's had gone to Petersburg. latter was finally compelled to withdraw to the north bank of Cedar Creek. Custer gained better results, however, on the Back road, with his usual dash driving the enemy's cavalry away from his front, Merritt's division then joining him and remainis ordered to join the right of Gordon on the field of battle, while Rosser was to carry the crossing of Cedar Creek on the Back road and attack Custer. Early's conceptions were carried through in the darkness with little accident or delay, Kershaw o
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
olicitude as soon as I knew Early had escaped me at New Market, for I felt certain that I should be urged to pursue the Confederates toward Charlottesville and Gordonsville, and be expected to operate on that line against Richmond. For many reasons I was much opposed to such a plan, but mainly because its execution would involve rrival of the enemy's infantry at Fisher's Hill, and the receipt, the night before, of the following despatch, which again opened the question of an advance on Gordonsville and Charlottesville: (Cipher.) Washington, October 12, 1864, 12 M. Major-General Sheridan: Lieutenant-General Grant wishes a position taken far enough south to serve as a base for further operations upon Gordonsville and Charlottesville. It must be strongly fortified and provisioned. Some point in the vicinity of Manassas Gap would seem best suited for all purposes. Colonel Alexander, of the Engineers, will be sent to consult with you as soon as you connect with General Augur.
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
eld, but they implored permission to remain till success was certain. When I reached the Valley pike Crook had reorganized his men, and as I desired that they should take part in the fight, for they were the very same troops that had turned Early's flank at the Opequon and at Fisher's Hill, I ordered them to be pushed forward; and the alacrity and celerity with which they moved on Middletown demonstrated that their ill-fortune of the morning had not sprung from lack of valor. Meanwhile Lowell's brigade of cavalry, which, it will be remembered, had been holding on, dismounted, just north of Middletown ever since the time I arrived from Winchester, fell to the rear for the purpose of getting their led horses. A momentary panic was created in the nearest brigade of infantry by this withdrawal of Lowell, but as soon as his men were mounted they charged the enemy clear up to the stone walls in the edge of Middletown; at sight of this the infantry brigade renewed its attack, and the e
Rivanna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ng that he could not do us serious hurt from there, I changed my mind as to attacking, deciding to defer such action till I could get to Washington, and come to some definite understanding about my future operations. To carry out this idea, on the evening of the 15th I ordered all of the cavalry under General Torbert to accompany me to Front Royal, again intending to push it thence through Chester Gap to the Virginia Central railroad at Charlottesville, to destroy the bridge over the Rivanna River, while I passed through Manassas Gap to Rectortown, and thence by rail to Washington. On my arrival with the cavalry near Front Royal on the 16th, I halted at the house of Mrs, Richards, on the north bank of the river, and there received the following despatch and inclosure from General Wright, who had been left in command at Cedar Creek: headquarters Middle Military division, October 16, 1864. General: I enclose you despatch which explains itself. If the enemy should be strongly r
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
was received, General Grant directed a salute of one hundred shotted guns to be fired into Petersburg, and the President at once thanked the army in an autograph letter. A few weeks after, he promoted me, and I received notice of this in a special letter from the Secretary of war, saying, that for the personal gallantry, military skill, and just confidence in the courage and patriotism of your troops, displayed by you on the 19th day of October at Cedar Run, whereby, under the blessing of Providence, your routed army was reorganized, a great National disaster averted, and a brilliant victory achieved over the rebels for the third time in pitched battle within thirty days, Philip H. Sheridan is appointed a major-general in the United States Army. The direct result of the battle was the recapture of all the artillery, transportation, and camp equipage we had lost, and in addition twenty-four pieces of the enemy's artillery, twelve hundred prisoners, and a number of battle-flags. But
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
not I would advance to Brown's Gap, and, after driving the enemy from there, follow him through the Blue Ridge into eastern Virginia. Indeed, this question began to cause me solicitude as soon as I knew Early had escaped me at New Market, for I felvernment and by public opinion at the North, that he advocated the wholly different conception of driving Early into eastern Virginia, and adhered to this plan with some tenacity. Considerable correspondence regarding the subject took place between next day. organization of the Union forces commanded by Major-General Philip H. Sheridan at the battle of Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864. Army of the Shenandoah. Major-General Horatio G. Wright.[Commanded during General Sheridan's temporaryOhio, Captain Wilbert B. Teters. One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio, Major Horace Kellogg. Second brigade:[At Winchester. Va., and not engaged in the battle.] Colonel William B. Curtis. First West Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Jacob Weddle. Fourth
Middle Marsh Brook (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
General Wright to resume command of the Sixth Corps, and Getty, who was temporarily in charge of it, to take command of his own division. A little later the Nineteenth Corps came up and was posted between the right of the Sixth Corps and Middle Marsh Brook. All this had consumed a great deal of time, and I concluded to visit again the point to the east of the Valley pike, from where I had first observed the enemy, to see what he was doing. Arrived there, I could plainly see him getting rhe reentering angle by a counter charge with his brigade, doing his work so well that the enemy's flanking troops were cut off from their main body and left to shift for themselves. Custer, who was just then moving in from the west side of Middle Marsh Brook, followed McMillan's timely blow with a charge of cavalry, but before starting out on it, and while his men were forming, riding at full speed himself, to throw his arms around my neck. By the time he had disengaged himself from this embra
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ion, and I solved the first step by determining to withdraw down the valley at least as far as Strasburg, which movement was begun on the 6th of October. The cavalry as it retired was stretched aforce, with infantry and cavalry, and attacked Colonel Thoburn, who had been pushed out toward Strasburg from Crook's command, and also Custer's division of cavalry on the Back road. As afterward apf the Confederates to the east of the Valley pike, and hence off their line of retreat through Strasburg to Fisher's Hill. The eagerness of the men soon frustrated this anticipation, however, the le, and all pushing ahead till we regained our old camps at Cedar Creek. Beyond Cedar Creek, at Strasburg, the pike makes a sharp turn to the west toward Fisher's Hill. and here Merritt uniting with rove House. General Early himself, with Kershaw's and Wharton's divisions, was to move through Strasburg, Kershaw, accompanied by Early, to cross Cedar Creek at Roberts's ford and connect with Gordon
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
eet Stanton Longstreet's message return to Winchester the ride to Cedar Creek the retreating Armn to Martinsburg, and thence by horseback to Winchester and Cedar Creek, and had ordered three hundrg mounted and started up the Valley pike for Winchester, leaving Captain Sheridan behind to conduct k Colonel Alexander out on the heights about Winchester, in order that he might overlook the country, Captain John Harper. Third brigade:[At Winchester, Va., and not engaged in the battle.] Colonel s. Twenty-third Illinois (battalion),[At Winchester, Va., and not engaged in the battle.] Captain eard from his line on the heights outside of Winchester, was still going on. I asked him if it soundo Colonel Edwards, commanding the brigade in Winchester, to stretch his troops across the valley, neought was to stop the army in the suburbs of Winchester as it came back, form a new line, and fight iddletown ever since the time I arrived from Winchester, fell to the rear for the purpose of getting[7 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...