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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
eroration-- has descended our federative creed, opposed to the idea of sectional conflict for private advantage, and favoring the wider expanse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppresse
Plattsburg (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
sed to the idea of sectional conflict for private advantage, and favoring the wider expanse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, the event, the pu
Point Isabel (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Secretary of War countermanded them, except as to such as had already joined. General Taylor, after making a depot at Point Isabel, advanced to the bank of the Rio Grande, opposite Matamoras, and there threw up an intrenchment, mounted field-guns, a a garrison to hold it, he marched, with an aggregate force of 2,288, to obtain the necessary additional supplies from Point Isabel, about three miles distant. General Arista, the new Mexican commander, availing himself of the opportunity, crossed ths, ten pieces of artillery, and a considerable amount of auxiliaries. In the afternoon of the second day's march from Point Isabel, these were reported by General Taylor's cavalry to occupy the road in his front. He halted at a water-hole to allow General Taylor assented. At the meeting it was developed that the prevalent opinion was in favor of falling back to Point Isabel, there to instruct and wait for reinforcements. After listening to a full expression of views, the General announced:
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
th the rifles which afterward became so celebrated as the Mississippi Rifles. He said that these would be more effective in the hands of our men than any other arms, as they were all used to hunting, and most of them had either a rifle or a double-barrelled shot-gun, and were good marksmen. Before leaving Washington for the scene of hostilities, Mr. Davis had an interview with General Scott. It may be interesting to state, said Mr. Davis in 1889, that General Scott endeavored to persuade me not to take more rifles than enough for four companies, and objected particularly to percussion arms as not having been sufficiently tested for the use of troops in the field. Knowing that the Mississippians would have no confidence in the old flint-lock muskets, I insisted on their being armed with the kind of rifle then recently made at New Haven, Conn.-the Whitney rifle. From having been first used by the Mississippians, those rifles have always been known as the Mississippi rifles.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 21
r, are mingled with profuse assurance of peace. Sir, we cannot expect, we should not require, our adversary to submit to more than we would bear; and I ask, after the notice has been given, and the twelve months have expired, who would allow Great Britain to exercise exclusive jurisdiction over Oregon? If we would resist such an act by force of arms, before ourselves performing it, we should prepare for war. Drawing a comparison between Texan annexation and Oregon occupation, Mr. Davis indat it met; an opposition based not upon a showing of the injury it would bring to them, but upon the supposition that benefits would be obtained by us. In referring to the support which the administration might expect in the event of war with England, Mr. Davis eloquently vindicated the loyalty of Mississippi. His State was fortunate in her champion. On this theme never once did he utter an uncertain note. As here, in his first speech in Congress, so, on every future occasion, in or out o
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ive creed, opposed to the idea of sectional conflict for private advantage, and favoring the wider expanse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, t
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
panse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, the event, the purpose it commemorates, that column rises stern, even severe, in its simplicity; neith
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
r of its need. But the marked omission of the gentleman from Missouri requires my attention. In recounting the services of the past, as earnest for the future, he gave to every neighboring name a place, but left out Mississippi; passed over it unheeded in his transit from Alabama to New Orleans. Sir, let me tell him that Mississippi's sons bled freely in the Creek campaign, and were leaders at Pensacola; further, let me tell him that, when they heard of an invading foe upon the coast of Louisiana, the spirit was so general to sally forth and meet him at the outer gate, that our Governor issued orders to restrain their going; and on the field to which he has so specially alluded — the battle of New Orleans --Mississippi dragoons, led by our gallant Hinds, performed that feat which the commanding general announced as the admiration of one army and the wonder of the other. Sir, I will only add that, whenever the honor of our country is assailed, wherever its territory is invaded — t
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
eness, assails a domestic institution of the South, I try to forgive, for the sake of the righteous among the wicked — our natural allies, the Democracy of the North. Thus, sir, I leave to silent contempt the malign predictions of the member from Ohio, who spoke in the early stage of this discussion; while it pleases me to remember the manly and patriotic sentiments of the gentleman who sits near me (Mr. McDowell). In him I recognize the feelings of our Western brethren; his were the sentimentsMr. Jefferson Davis, the other was Mr. Andrew Johnson. Mr. Davis, in supporting the resolution, had protested against the unjust criticisms on the army and the West Point Academy, which had been expressed a few days previously by a member from Ohio. He hoped that gentleman (Mr. Sawyer) would now learn the value of military science, and that he would see in the location, construction, and the defence of the bastioned field-work opposite Matamoras the utility, the necessity of a military educ
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
xpediency of converting a portion of the forts of the United States into schools for military instruction, on the basis of substituting their present garrisons of enlisted men by detachments furnished from each State of our Union, in ratio of their several representatives in the Congress of the United States. The second: Instructing the Committee on the Post-office and Post-roads to inquire into the expediency of establishing a direct daily mail route from Montgomery, Ala., to Jackson, Miss. With the presentation of these resolutions Mr. Davis for a time seemed satisfied. He remained in his seat, however, a keen observer of the forms of parliamentary procedure, and made himself practically familiar with the questions likely to come up for discussion during the session. His first speech was successful. On February 6, 1846, on the Oregon question, in Committee of the Whole, he addressed the House. It seems needless at this late day to revive dead discussions and
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