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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
e, and suffered much from the inclement weather and excessive cold. The retreat continued to the south bank of the Rappahannock, where a halt was called, and the troops encamped. In the undue haste to retire from the front of McClellan, who d Davis. The President immediately went to General Johnston's headquarters, and found him on the south bank of the Rappahannock River, to which he had retired, in a position possessing great natural advantages. Upon inquiring whether the south b forgotten that Mr. Davis visited him at his headquarters in the field after he had retreated to the south bank of the Rappahannock, and that together they went to Fredericksburg. He uses these words: Mr. Davis's narrative that follows is friend and connection, Mr. J. T. Doswell. The morning after their arrival, they crossed to the north side of the Rappahannock River, and were absent some hours examining the country. On their return to Mr. Doswell's house, many citizens called to
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
before McClellan's invasion; the latter accordingly addressed to him the following letter: Richmond, Va., February 28, 1862. General J. E. Johnston: Your opinion that your position may be turnedy truly and respectfully yours, Jefferson Davis. The President again wrote as follows: Richmond, Va., March 6, 1862. Generalj. E. Johnston: Notwithstanding the threatening position of the en On March 15th the President received notice that the army was in retreat, and replied: Richmond, Va., March 15, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Headquarters Army of the Potomac. General: I havy yours, Jefferson Davis. On the same day the President sent the following telegram: Richmond, Va., March 15, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Culpepper Court-House, Va. Your letter of the 13to duty temporarily with General Lee, and will report to the Adjutant and Inspector-General, Richmond, Va., for further orders. By command of General Johnston. A. P. Mason. The following let
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ure a free exchange of prisoners, which, had it been carried out in good faith by the Federals, would have saved from unavoidable suffering and death, thousands of both armies. In view of the near approach of the spring campaign, President Davis issued the following proclamation: By virtue of the power vested in me by law, to declare the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus in cities threatened with invasion; I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do proclaim that martial law is hereby extended over the city of Richmond and the adjoining country to the distance of ten miles. And I do proclaim the suspension of all civil jurisdiction with the exception of the Mayor of the city, and the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus within the said city and surrounding country to the distance aforesaid. In faith whereof I have hereunto signed my name and set my seal, at the city of Richmond, on the first day o
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 19
the near approach of the spring campaign, President Davis issued the following proclamation: B cities threatened with invasion; I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of Aurned, notwithstanding the urgent warning of Mr. Davis in his letters of February 28th and of MarchPines, seems to have entirely forgotten that Mr. Davis visited him at his headquarters in the fieldericksburg. He uses these words: Mr. Davis's narrative that follows is disposed of by te of any great importance to history whether Mr. Davis and General Johnston did or did not visit Frare also appended to prove conclusively that Mr. Davis, and not General Johnston, is right: Frederreply to your inquiry whether I knew that President Davis visited Fredericksburg in March, 1862, Iom Richmond, about g or 10 A. M., I found President Davis, General Johnston, and General Holmes at burg, August 17, 1885. In March, 1862, President Davis and General J. E. Johnston visited Freder
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 19
rs taken by the armies of the belligerents, and an officer was sent by General Johnston to General McClellan. The proposition was not entertained by the Federal Government, and our efforts to shoSidney Johnston. The Federal forces then organizing in front of Washington, under General George B. McClellan, and estimated to number one hundred thousand men, gave indication of active operatioed his position as unsafe, and a withdrawal of the army from Centreville was necessary before McClellan's invasion; the latter accordingly addressed to him the following letter: Richmond, Va., Febra halt was called, and the troops encamped. In the undue haste to retire from the front of McClellan, who did not follow, nor even interfere with General Johnston's rear-guard, stores, arms, clotas before the arrival here of any of General Johnston's troops on their movement toward Yorktown, and before any of General McClellan's transports had passed down the Potomac River. W. S. Barton.
T. B. Barton (search for this): chapter 19
reconnaissance soon manifested that the hills on the opposite bank commanded the town, and therefore Fredericksburg could only be defended by an army occupying the opposite hills, for which the Confederate force was inadequate. While in Fredericksburg the President and General Johnston were the guests of J. Temple Doswell, and at his house met a large number of ladies and gentlemen, among whom were the Honorable W. S. Barton, R. W. Adams, F. T. Forbes, J. L. Marye, and the venerable T. B. Barton. In answer to the question as to the result of the reconnaissance, the President replied to Mr. Doswell, during their ride, that Fredericksburg was right in the wrong place for military defence. Upon learning that the town was not to be defended, young and old, with self-sacrificing patriotism, answered, If the good of our cause requires the defence of the town to be abandoned, let it be done. The President returned to Richmond to await the further development of the enemy's plans
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 19
e distance of ten miles. And I do proclaim the suspension of all civil jurisdiction with the exception of the Mayor of the city, and the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus within the said city and surrounding country to the distance aforesaid. In faith whereof I have hereunto signed my name and set my seal, at the city of Richmond, on the first day of March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. (Seal.) Jefferson Davis. On February 2d General Beauregard took leave of the Army of the Potomac, having been transferred to the army in West Tennessee, commanded by Albert Sidney Johnston. The Federal forces then organizing in front of Washington, under General George B. McClellan, and estimated to number one hundred thousand men, gave indication of active operations. General Johnston, in a personal interview in Richmond, gave notice that he considered his position as unsafe, and a withdrawal of the army from Centreville was necessary b
J. B. Washington (search for this): chapter 19
he Century of May, 1885, entitled Manassas to seven Pines, seems to have entirely forgotten that Mr. Davis visited him at his headquarters in the field after he had retreated to the south bank of the Rappahannock, and that together they went to Fredericksburg. He uses these words: Mr. Davis's narrative that follows is disposed of by the proof that after the army left Manassas the President did not visit it until about May 14 That he did not make such a visit is proved by Major J. B. Washington, aide-de-camp, Dr. Fauntleroy, surgeon, and Colonel E. J. Harvie, staff officers, who testify that they have no recollection whatever of such a visit at such a time. While it may not be of any great importance to history whether Mr. Davis and General Johnston did or did not visit Fredericksburg together, still positive proof is presented that such a visit was made, and that General Johnston's memory has failed him. In the Rebellion Records, published by the War Department at
on the roadside, and suffered much from the inclement weather and excessive cold. The retreat continued to the south bank of the Rappahannock, where a halt was called, and the troops encamped. In the undue haste to retire from the front of McClellan, who did not follow, nor even interfere with General Johnston's rear-guard, stores, arms, clothing, etc., were abandoned and burned, notwithstanding the urgent warning of Mr. Davis in his letters of February 28th and of March 6th. General Early, in stating the amount of unnecessary loss at Manassas, wrote as follows: A very large amount of stores and provisions had been abandoned for want of transportation, and among the stores was a very large quantity of clothing, blankets, etc., which had been provided by the States south of Virginia for their own troops. The pile of trunks along the railroad was appalling to behold. All these stores, clothing, trunks, etc., were consigned to the flames by a portion of our cavalry
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 19
Jefferson Davis. The President immediately went to General Johnston's headquarters, and found him on the south bank of thued to command the other side down to Fredericksburg, General Johnston replied he did not know, that he had not been there for many years. The President and General Johnston proceeded to Fredericksburg, and a reconnaissance soon manifested thatequate. While in Fredericksburg the President and General Johnston were the guests of J. Temple Doswell, and at his housait the further development of the enemy's plans. General Johnston, in an article in the Century of May, 1885, entitled any great importance to history whether Mr. Davis and General Johnston did or did not visit Fredericksburg together, still poof is presented that such a visit was made, and that General Johnston's memory has failed him. In the Rebellion Recordsitively that it was before the arrival here of any of General Johnston's troops on their movement toward Yorktown, and befor
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