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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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G. W. Rains (search for this): chapter 7
Indian wars of 1836 and 1837, in the Mexican war of 1845, and last in the war between the States. The appropriations for the Navy had for years been mainly spent upon the Northern navy-yards, notwithstanding that much of the timber used had been from the South. We had not the accessories for building vessels with the necessary celerity; we had no powder depots, and no store of it on hand, no saltpetre, and only the store of sulphur needful for clarifying the cane-sugar crop. General G. W. Rains was appointed to establish a manufactory of ammunition, and he brought to the work experience and zeal which achieved a triumph that will be long remembered. The powder of the Confederate mills, under all the disadvantages that surrounded him, was recognized to be the best in the world. On April 19, 1861, President Lincoln proclaimed a blockade, not as the effort to embarrass and destroy the commerce of a separate nation, but to subdue insurrection. Mr. Davis wrote of the fal
nts and enthusiasm, there would remain to us no presentation of the noble figure of a heroic ruler. If Moses found, in the theocratic government he served, a golden calf lifted on high under the blaze of the pillar of fire by night, one cannot wonder at my husband's fate. Detraction is the easiest form of criticism or eloquence, but just, discriminating praise requires the presence in the commentators of many of those qualities which are commended in the subject. It is probable that Junius would have made a sorry figure in the place of either Lords Mansfield or Chatham. Before going further into the record of the invasion of the seceded slave-holding States, and the subjugation of those that still remained in the Union, it seems proper to glance briefly at the relative resources of the two powers that were so soon to be arrayed against each other in deadly conflict a £outrance. In 1860 the United States had a population exceeding thirty-one millions in the free States
R. J. Moses (search for this): chapter 7
demonstrated by the leaders of a cause for which they have staked their all, have not been silent at the Confederate President's failure to buy everything needful everywhere. The fame of an unsuccessful leader is like the picture in the fable. Each hypercritical spectator picks out an error and obliterates the trait, until, were there not true artists with high aims and Godgiven talents and enthusiasm, there would remain to us no presentation of the noble figure of a heroic ruler. If Moses found, in the theocratic government he served, a golden calf lifted on high under the blaze of the pillar of fire by night, one cannot wonder at my husband's fate. Detraction is the easiest form of criticism or eloquence, but just, discriminating praise requires the presence in the commentators of many of those qualities which are commended in the subject. It is probable that Junius would have made a sorry figure in the place of either Lords Mansfield or Chatham. Before going furthe
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 7
destroy the commerce of a separate nation, but to subdue insurrection. Mr. Davis wrote of the false presentation of the case to foreign governments made by Mr. Seward: As late as April 22, 1861, Mr. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, in a despatch to Mr. Dayton, Minister to France, since made public, expressMr. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, in a despatch to Mr. Dayton, Minister to France, since made public, expressed the views and purposes of the United States Government in the premises as follows. It may be proper to explain that, by what he is pleased to term the Revolution, Mr. Seward means the withdrawal of the Southern States; and that the words italicized are, perhaps, not so distinguished in the original. He wrote: The Territories Mr. Seward means the withdrawal of the Southern States; and that the words italicized are, perhaps, not so distinguished in the original. He wrote: The Territories will remain in all respects the same, whether the revolution shall succeed or fail. There is not even a pretext for the complaint that the disaffected States are to be conquered by the United States if the revolution fails; for the rights of the States and the condition of every being in them will remain subject to exactly the
s appointed Quartermaster-General; Captain L. B. Northrop was appointed to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir of his service, and Mr. Davis could not notice it in extenso. Surgeon-General Moore, from the Materia Medica of the South, supplemented the lack of drugs made contraband of war, and by the aid of his own ingenuity and that of his corps, supplied the surgical instruments, which were unfortunately scarce and especially needful for the hospitals in the field. General Gorgas was appointed Chief of Ordnance, and if space were permitted to particularize the incalculable service he rendered, the offering would be gladly made to the memory of one who was as unpretending as he was useful and devoted to the cause. Captain Semmes wvas sent to the North to buy guns and all the available arms in the market, and also to get machinery and artisans for Government arsenals and shops; he ably performed the service, but the intervention of the civil authorities preven
A. C. Meyers (search for this): chapter 7
ion of personal interest that they had received their appointment before they were aware it was to be conferred. The order of their rank was: General Samuel Cooper, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee. When General A. S. Johnston was assigned to the West, he for the first time asked and learned what relative position he would serve. General Lee, in like manner, when he was assigned to duty beyond the limits of Virginia, learned for the first time his increased rank. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. Meyers was appointed Quartermaster-General; Captain L. B. Northrop was appointed to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir of his service, and Mr. Davis could not notice it in extenso. Surgeon-General Moore, from the Materia Medica of the South, supplemented the lack of drugs made contraband of war, and by the aid of his own ingenuity and that of his corps, supplied the surgical instruments, which were unfortunately scarce and especially needful for the hospitals in
S. Johnston was assigned to the West, he for the first time asked and learned what relative position he would serve. General Lee, in like manner, when he was assigned to duty beyond the limits of Virginia, learned for the first time his increased rank. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. Meyers was appointed Quartermaster-General; Captain L. B. Northrop was appointed to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir of his service, and Mr. Davis could not notice it in extenso. Surgeon-General Moore, from the Materia Medica of the South, supplemented the lack of drugs made contraband of war, and by the aid of his own ingenuity and that of his corps, supplied the surgical instruments, which were unfortunately scarce and especially needful for the hospitals in the field. General Gorgas was appointed Chief of Ordnance, and if space were permitted to particularize the incalculable service he rendered, the offering would be gladly made to the memory of one who was as unpretendin
Mansfield (search for this): chapter 7
oble figure of a heroic ruler. If Moses found, in the theocratic government he served, a golden calf lifted on high under the blaze of the pillar of fire by night, one cannot wonder at my husband's fate. Detraction is the easiest form of criticism or eloquence, but just, discriminating praise requires the presence in the commentators of many of those qualities which are commended in the subject. It is probable that Junius would have made a sorry figure in the place of either Lords Mansfield or Chatham. Before going further into the record of the invasion of the seceded slave-holding States, and the subjugation of those that still remained in the Union, it seems proper to glance briefly at the relative resources of the two powers that were so soon to be arrayed against each other in deadly conflict a £outrance. In 1860 the United States had a population exceeding thirty-one millions in the free States and eight millions in the South. But the disparity between the
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 7
to the work experience and zeal which achieved a triumph that will be long remembered. The powder of the Confederate mills, under all the disadvantages that surrounded him, was recognized to be the best in the world. On April 19, 1861, President Lincoln proclaimed a blockade, not as the effort to embarrass and destroy the commerce of a separate nation, but to subdue insurrection. Mr. Davis wrote of the false presentation of the case to foreign governments made by Mr. Seward: As case the States would be federally connected with the new Confederacy; in the other they would, as now, be members of the United States; but their Constitutions, laws, customs, habits, and institutions, in either case, will remain the same. Mr. Lincoln said in his inaugural address: I have no purpose directly or indirectly to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists; I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so. The President
Raphael Semmes (search for this): chapter 7
emented the lack of drugs made contraband of war, and by the aid of his own ingenuity and that of his corps, supplied the surgical instruments, which were unfortunately scarce and especially needful for the hospitals in the field. General Gorgas was appointed Chief of Ordnance, and if space were permitted to particularize the incalculable service he rendered, the offering would be gladly made to the memory of one who was as unpretending as he was useful and devoted to the cause. Captain Semmes wvas sent to the North to buy guns and all the available arms in the market, and also to get machinery and artisans for Government arsenals and shops; he ably performed the service, but the intervention of the civil authorities prevented the delivery of the arms and machinery. He was also directed to buy vessels suitable for defensive and offensive use, but unfortunately could find none. Major Huse was sent to Europe, on the third day after Mr. Davis's inauguration, to buy arms there.
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