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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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J. A. Hayes (search for this): chapter 78
s at stated hours during the day, and thus a part of the first volume was written. As soon as it was considered advisable, ill April of 1878, leaving my little girl in Carlsruhe, I returned home. After a short time spent with our daughter, Mrs. Hayes, and our only remaining son Jefferson, now grown a strong, sober, industrious, and witty young man, who was exceedingly intimate with his father, and loved him devotedly-indeed they were like two young friends together — I joined my husband at Dorsey about this time felt the persistent advances of a fatal malady under which she had been suffering for many years, and concluded to seek the aid of an eminent surgeon in New Orleans, and while I was absent in attendance upon my daughter, Mrs. Hayes, who was quite ill, Mrs. Dorsey sold Beauvoir House to Mr. Davis at a fair valuation, and went to New Orleans. She seemed for a while to recuperate, but eventually died from the reappearance of her disease. Before her death she extracted a pr
Sarah A. Dorsey (search for this): chapter 78
e isolation seemed favorable to his purpose. Beauvoir House was owned and occupied by Mrs. Sarah A. Dorsey, an old schoolmate of mine, and a literary woman of some note. Several of her female rel to an assistant to join him and establish himself at some convenient distance on the coast. Mrs. Dorsey offered her clerical services at stated hours during the day, and thus a part of the first vosay: I do not know why I suffer so much, it cannot be long before I am reunited to my boy. Mrs. Dorsey about this time felt the persistent advances of a fatal malady under which she had been sufferleans, and while I was absent in attendance upon my daughter, Mrs. Hayes, who was quite ill, Mrs. Dorsey sold Beauvoir House to Mr. Davis at a fair valuation, and went to New Orleans. She seemed fo that he might not refuse it, the reversion was made to our youngest daughter, then a minor. Mrs. Dorsey's uniform kindness to him and deference to his wishes had endeared her to him, and he felt he
hus a part of the first volume was written. As soon as it was considered advisable, ill April of 1878, leaving my little girl in Carlsruhe, I returned home. After a short time spent with our daughter, Mrs. Hayes, and our only remaining son Jefferson, now grown a strong, sober, industrious, and witty young man, who was exceedingly intimate with his father, and loved him devotedly-indeed they were like two young friends together — I joined my husband at Beauvoir. As Mr. Davis had lost al refuge from the heat of Memphis in the West, but as her husband could not leave his bank in Memphis, she, fearless of the consequences to herself, returned to the neighborhood of that place to be near him in case he should be ill. Our only son Jefferson was also in the bank, and insisted on remaining near his sister. We were environed by yellow fever on all sides at Beauvoir. Mr. Davis thought he could not leave on account of his literary labor to join our children, and I feared to leave him
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 78
ut the same cheerful buoyant person, and that proved to be our last farewell to him. We returned home in November of the same year, and took up our abode at Beauvoir. The people of Alabama invited Mr. Davis to visit them the next year, and our daughter Varina, known as Winnie in the family, accompanied him. The enthusiasm with which he was received could not be described. All classes came to do him honor, and the journey was extended to Atlanta and Savannah, and at the former place Governor Gordon, our heroic paladin of the long ago, presented Varina to an enthusiastic crowd as The daughter of the Confederacy. She was adopted then by the rank and file of our veterans, and now values their suffrages more than any earthly privilege. Some years later, our whole family were urged to be present at the yearly agricultural fair at Macon. We were asked by, and accepted the kind invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Marsh Johnson, to remain with them during our stay. The enthusiasm baffled desc
ote: The publishers are responsible for the authography of these volumes. He would not change his mode of spelling, and insisted that sabre and theatre were correct, and if the publishers insisted upon saber and theater, they must take the discredit of the innovation. The expense of an assistant, and the price of the book, which placed it beyond the reach of poor Confederates, as well as the fact that an inadequate compensation to him had been agreed upon by his agent with the Messrs. Appleton, prevented the book from being pecuniarily remunerative to him; but he said he had not undertaken it as a matter of profit, and therefore must be satisfied if the end was gained of setting the righteous motives of the South before the world. As soon as The Rise and fall was completed we embarked at New Orleans, and went to Liverpool, and from there to meet our young daughter, who had left Germany for the advantage of a few months in Paris before quitting school. We remained three month
A. Dudley Mann (search for this): chapter 78
as a matter of profit, and therefore must be satisfied if the end was gained of setting the righteous motives of the South before the world. As soon as The Rise and fall was completed we embarked at New Orleans, and went to Liverpool, and from there to meet our young daughter, who had left Germany for the advantage of a few months in Paris before quitting school. We remained three months in Paris, and during this time Mr. Davis spent the greater part of his time with his old friend, A. Dudley Mann, at Chantilly. Mr. Benjamin came to us there, older, but the same cheerful buoyant person, and that proved to be our last farewell to him. We returned home in November of the same year, and took up our abode at Beauvoir. The people of Alabama invited Mr. Davis to visit them the next year, and our daughter Varina, known as Winnie in the family, accompanied him. The enthusiasm with which he was received could not be described. All classes came to do him honor, and the journey was ext
refore must be satisfied if the end was gained of setting the righteous motives of the South before the world. As soon as The Rise and fall was completed we embarked at New Orleans, and went to Liverpool, and from there to meet our young daughter, who had left Germany for the advantage of a few months in Paris before quitting school. We remained three months in Paris, and during this time Mr. Davis spent the greater part of his time with his old friend, A. Dudley Mann, at Chantilly. Mr. Benjamin came to us there, older, but the same cheerful buoyant person, and that proved to be our last farewell to him. We returned home in November of the same year, and took up our abode at Beauvoir. The people of Alabama invited Mr. Davis to visit them the next year, and our daughter Varina, known as Winnie in the family, accompanied him. The enthusiasm with which he was received could not be described. All classes came to do him honor, and the journey was extended to Atlanta and Savannah,
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 78
th of Jefferson Davis, Jr.—Honors Awarded by Mr. Davis's countrymen. When the affairs of the Mississippi Valley Company were wound up, Mr. Davis looked about for a place so quiet and secluded thaer — I joined my husband at Beauvoir. As Mr. Davis had lost all his papers, the history of the d by yellow fever on all sides at Beauvoir. Mr. Davis thought he could not leave on account of hisom us, and we had but two children left. Mr. Davis was crushed by the blow and could not rally.uite ill, Mrs. Dorsey sold Beauvoir House to Mr. Davis at a fair valuation, and went to New Orleansd been sent down by the publishers to assist Mr. Davis in compilation, and Mr. Davis derived much afelt in his rectitude and piety. I wrote to Mr. Davis's dictation, for we knew nothing of typewriting since eight o'clock in the evening, when Mr. Davis dictated: In asserting the right of secessio Beauvoir. The people of Alabama invited Mr. Davis to visit them the next year, and our daughte[5 more...]<
y well any trust; but upon her showing persistence, he, believing the trust to be one of an eleemosynary nature, consented After her death he discovered that the property was devised to him, but in order that he might not refuse it, the reversion was made to our youngest daughter, then a minor. Mrs. Dorsey's uniform kindness to him and deference to his wishes had endeared her to him, and he felt her death very much. This again interrupted the progress of the book. After a few months Judge Tenney, a man of just and cultivated mind, had been sent down by the publishers to assist Mr. Davis in compilation, and Mr. Davis derived much aid from his labors, and comfort from the profound confidence he felt in his rectitude and piety. I wrote to Mr. Davis's dictation, for we knew nothing of typewriters then. Finally, after three years from the commencement of the book, it was finished. It was four o'clock, and I had been writing since eight o'clock in the evening, when Mr. Davis dict
Marsh Johnson (search for this): chapter 78
lege. Some years later, our whole family were urged to be present at the yearly agricultural fair at Macon. We were asked by, and accepted the kind invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Marsh Johnson, to remain with them during our stay. The enthusiasm baffled description, and on Veterans' Day, as it rained steadily, they were to march toMrs. Marsh Johnson, to remain with them during our stay. The enthusiasm baffled description, and on Veterans' Day, as it rained steadily, they were to march to Colonel Johnson's house to greet Mr. Davis; but they were too impatient to pursue the circuitous carriage route, but jumped over the fence and came running and shouting all the way to greet their old chief; the tattered battle flags were borne in the strong hands that saved them twenty years before from capture, and with tender wColonel Johnson's house to greet Mr. Davis; but they were too impatient to pursue the circuitous carriage route, but jumped over the fence and came running and shouting all the way to greet their old chief; the tattered battle flags were borne in the strong hands that saved them twenty years before from capture, and with tender words they called him worthy to be loved, who looked his last at them through eyes shining with a pride in them too great for words; but the strong, brave heart that had not quailed under danger, imprisonment, and vilification, sunk under the weight of his people's love, and he was stricken with heart failure. After days of sufferi
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