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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
g. If not, if a different sentiment is to prevail, what must we think of the manhood of men who should entertain it. Now, sir, be it known to you that those of us who pledged our faith to each other for the establishment of the Confederacy gave up all for which we contended when it failed, retaining to ourselves only one solitary satisfactory reflection, and that is that we had at least served our country faithfully, honestly, and devotedly as we understood it. Senator Joseph Brown, of Georgia, also disclaimed ever receiving such a letter. General Sherman did not specify the other of the three ex-Governors who became senators as the person who received the apocryphal letter. After this false charge three times disproved by the reputed actors in General Sherman's so-called conspiracy by Mr. Davis to intimidate the Governors, the Senate entered General Sherman's misrepresentations on the Journal of that body, and the consolation my husband had in looking at this crystallizatio
letter had been addressed. He thought that this denial at. both ends of the line would conclude the matter, but it seemed he was mistaken. General Sherman said: At Raleigh a mass of public records had been carried off; yet a number were left behind at the State House and a mansion called the Palace, which we occupied as headquarters during our stay there, namely, from April 13 to April 29, 1860. These records and papers were overhauled by professional clerks, who delivered to Adjutant-General Sawyer such information as was material, and attention was only drawn to such as were deemed of sufficient importance. Among the books collected at the Palace in Raleigh was a clerk's or secretary's copy-book containing loose sheets and letters, among which was the particular letter of Davis, to which I referred in my St. Louis speech. It explained to me why Governor Vance, after sending to me a commissioner to treat for his State particularly, now awaited my answer. I am quite sure t
Brown Stand (search for this): chapter 79
me. The balance of his letter contains only extraneous matter, having no reference to the explicit charge made. The following account of the presentation of General Sherman's letter to the United States Senate appeared in the public prints, and one of the captions is quoted here: No Scapegoat Wanted. The South Responsible, not President Davis. Continuation of the Debate in the United States Senate on the Resolution to Print Senator Sherman's Historical Papers-Senators Vance and Brown Stand by their Record-General Sherman's Mendacity Thoroughly Exposed-The Resolution Passed.-Washington, January 13th.-In the Senate, at ten o'clock, on motion of Senator Hawley, his resolution to call upon the President for copies of the papers filed in the War Department by General Sherman, as a reply to certain strictures of Mr. Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States, was taken up. Senator Vance said that as the Senate would probably pass this resolution and place on
, either North or South, is a reckless falsehood, especially, because it was generally known that for many years before, as well as during the war between the States, I was an earnest advocate of the strict construction State-rights theory of Mr. Jefferson. What motive other than personal malignity can be conceived for so gross a libel? If General Sherman has access to any letters purporting to have been written by me, which will sustain his accusations, let him produce them or wear the br there was no such letter there and no such copy-books when Vance occupied the house; fourth, he averred most positively, on the honor of a gentleman and an American Senator, that no letter containing such a threat was ever received by him from Jefferson Davis. All letters from President Davis to him of any nature were to be found copied in the letter-books of the Executive Department of North Carolina, which books were now in the War Department. The reasons given by General Sherman to co
Sherman's letter to the United States Senate appeared in the public prints, and one of the captions is quoted here: No Scapegoat Wanted. The South Responsible, not President Davis. Continuation of the Debate in the United States Senate on the Resolution to Print Senator Sherman's Historical Papers-Senators Vance and Brown Stand by their Record-General Sherman's Mendacity Thoroughly Exposed-The Resolution Passed.-Washington, January 13th.-In the Senate, at ten o'clock, on motion of Senator Hawley, his resolution to call upon the President for copies of the papers filed in the War Department by General Sherman, as a reply to certain strictures of Mr. Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States, was taken up. Senator Vance said that as the Senate would probably pass this resolution and place on its record an unofficial paper by General William T. Sherman, which makes certain statements about persons, it was proper that all persons affected by those statements s
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 79
o a man whose name I cannot mention, because he is a United States Senator. I know Davis's writing, and saw his signature, and in that letter he said he would turn Lee's army against any State that might attempt to secede from the Southern Confederacy. This public assault, under the covert plea that it is based upon informatiohim) that the President of the Southern Confederacy had, during the progress of the war, changed his States' rights doctrines, and had threatened to use force-even Lee's army — should any State of the Confederacy attempt to secede from the Government. He added: Yet I shrink not from a just responsibility for every word uttered th letter addressed to one now a United States Senator, which he knew to be in my handwriting and with my signature, in which letter I had declared my purpose to turn Lee's army against any State that might attempt to secede from the Southern Confederacy. I also denounced this assertion as false, and demanded that General Sherman sh
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 79
my of the Republic, in St. Louis in 1884, General Sherman was reported to have made allegations, hetter characterizing those statements. General Sherman's remarks were published in the Globe-Dembe conceived for so gross a libel? If General Sherman has access to any letters purporting to hould not have been the one referred to by General Sherman in his statement, authorized the followin Those letter-books were taken from me by General Sherman's troops at the closing of the war, and aference to the recent controversy between General Sherman and Jefferson Davis, in which the former etary, that thus became of public record, General Sherman relates the incident of his having been p following account of the presentation of General Sherman's letter to the United States Senate appe States Senate on the Resolution to Print Senator Sherman's Historical Papers-Senators Vance and Brown Stand by their Record-General Sherman's Mendacity Thoroughly Exposed-The Resolution Passed.-Was[6 more...]
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 79
d published account of remarks made by General W. T. Sherman, and ask the use of your columns to noform. He said that the newspapers stated General Sherman had been interviewed, who said that Vancein files, where they still remain; third, General Sherman did not find in the copybook the particul War Department. The reasons given by General Sherman to corroborate his statement were such, Smend themselves to a respectable lawyer. General Sherman said he had paid little attention to the d not say that he ever saw it afterward. General Sherman had said further: Davis being then himsel But there was another matter averred by General Sherman that more nearly concerned Senator Vance,disclaimed ever receiving such a letter. General Sherman did not specify the other of the three exons alike unfounded and indefensible. General Sherman in a published address stated that he hadhis assertion as false, and demanded that General Sherman should produce the evidence on which the [7 more...]
Chester A. Arthur (search for this): chapter 79
ular sentiment which supports any measure necessary to protect our country and secure our political independence. Like yourself, I have hoped that party distinctions which existed at a former time would be buried in the graves of the gallant men who have fallen in defence of their birthright, and that we should all as a band of brothers strike for the inheritance our fathers left us. With sincere regard I am respectfully and truly, (Signed.) Jefferson Davis. On January 16, 1885, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States, in answer to a Senate resolution, January 13, 1885, sent the copy of a letter to the Secretary of War, from General W. T. Sherman, dated January 6, 1885. In this letter to the secretary, that thus became of public record, General Sherman relates the incident of his having been present at the meeting of the G. A. R. Post, in St. Louis, and reiterates his remarks with slight variation, that he had seen papers which convinced me (him) that the Presiden
Joseph Brown (search for this): chapter 79
et than one crawling. If not, if a different sentiment is to prevail, what must we think of the manhood of men who should entertain it. Now, sir, be it known to you that those of us who pledged our faith to each other for the establishment of the Confederacy gave up all for which we contended when it failed, retaining to ourselves only one solitary satisfactory reflection, and that is that we had at least served our country faithfully, honestly, and devotedly as we understood it. Senator Joseph Brown, of Georgia, also disclaimed ever receiving such a letter. General Sherman did not specify the other of the three ex-Governors who became senators as the person who received the apocryphal letter. After this false charge three times disproved by the reputed actors in General Sherman's so-called conspiracy by Mr. Davis to intimidate the Governors, the Senate entered General Sherman's misrepresentations on the Journal of that body, and the consolation my husband had in looking at t
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