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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Monticello (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
Report of General Patton Anderson of operations of his division from 30th of July to 31st of August, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. [From the original unpublished Ms. in archives of the Southern Historical Society.] Monticello, Florida, February 9th, 1865. In compliance with circular order from Headquarters Lee's Corps, dated January 24th, 1864-a copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wounded and missing upwards of five hundred men and officers. On the 29th I was assigned to, and on the 30th assumed, the command of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades o
East Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
headquarters to hold the division in readiness to move to the left at 4 o'clock the following morning. At the appointed hour the command was withdrawn from the trenches, and, moving left in front, proceeded about two miles in the direction of East Point, when it was halted by orders from corps headquarters at the point where our line of march crossed the Campbellton road. We rested here till about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, when we were directed to proceed to East Point and relieve Cheatham'East Point and relieve Cheatham's division, then in the trenches in front of that place and on the left of the railroad running to West Point. The head of the column reached this position shortly before sundown and commenced relieving Cheatham's division as soon as the necessary information in regard to the lines, pickets, details, &c., could be obtained from Brigadier-General Maury, in command. About the time that the work of relieving Gen. Maury's command had been completed, or nearly sosay at 9 o'clock P. M.-I received or
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
At the appointed hour the command was withdrawn from the trenches, and, moving left in front, proceeded about two miles in the direction of East Point, when it was halted by orders from corps headquarters at the point where our line of march crossed the Campbellton road. We rested here till about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, when we were directed to proceed to East Point and relieve Cheatham's division, then in the trenches in front of that place and on the left of the railroad running to West Point. The head of the column reached this position shortly before sundown and commenced relieving Cheatham's division as soon as the necessary information in regard to the lines, pickets, details, &c., could be obtained from Brigadier-General Maury, in command. About the time that the work of relieving Gen. Maury's command had been completed, or nearly sosay at 9 o'clock P. M.-I received orders to withdraw the troops from the trenches and to follow Cheatham's division in the direction of Jone
Jonesboro (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
to withdraw the troops from the trenches and to follow Cheatham's division in the direction of Jonesboroa. Repairing to General Maury's quarters to ascertain when be would be ready to move, I learned from him that he had received no orders to move to Jonesboroa, but, upon showing him mine, he immediately made preparations to commence the movement. It was about eleven o'clock before his rear and kind. In this plight the division, well closed up on Cheatham's rear, reached the vicinity of Jonesboroa at about 11 o'clock A. M. on the 31st August, and was halted on the railroad, north of and abown forward, and hasty preparations made for commencing, at the proper time, the battle of Jonesboroa, Georgia. The troops were advanced to a position parallel with and about two hundred yards wesnates, it is not in my power to state accurately the casualties in the division on this day at Jonesboroa, though I am confident they will be found to exceed five hundred in killed, wounded, and missi
Sandtown (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ng captured a few stragglers, some sutler's stores, several wagons and mules with forage, broken-down horses, &c. On the 28th and 29th small parties were sent forward for the purpose of scouting my whole front thoroughly, and of ascertaining, if possible, the precise route taken by the enemy, and for the purpose, generally, of getting all the information possible in regard to his movements. These scouts reported the enemy as having moved the larger portion of his forces in the direction of Sandtown and Blue-pond; but one corps, at least, they reported to have crossed the Chattahoochee river, and to have moved up that stream, on or near its right bank, in the direction of the railroad bridge or Marietta. Early in the night of the 29th I received orders from corps headquarters to hold the division in readiness to move to the left at 4 o'clock the following morning. At the appointed hour the command was withdrawn from the trenches, and, moving left in front, proceeded about two mile
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
t thoroughly, and of ascertaining, if possible, the precise route taken by the enemy, and for the purpose, generally, of getting all the information possible in regard to his movements. These scouts reported the enemy as having moved the larger portion of his forces in the direction of Sandtown and Blue-pond; but one corps, at least, they reported to have crossed the Chattahoochee river, and to have moved up that stream, on or near its right bank, in the direction of the railroad bridge or Marietta. Early in the night of the 29th I received orders from corps headquarters to hold the division in readiness to move to the left at 4 o'clock the following morning. At the appointed hour the command was withdrawn from the trenches, and, moving left in front, proceeded about two miles in the direction of East Point, when it was halted by orders from corps headquarters at the point where our line of march crossed the Campbellton road. We rested here till about 4 o'clock in the afternoon,
mand of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades of Mississippians, Deas' brigade of Alabamians, and Manigault's brigade of Alabama and South Carolina troops. Lee's corps was, at that time, holding the extreme left of our lines ie right of Lee's corps-my right resting on the Lickskillet road, my left on Utoy creek. Deas', Brantley's, Sharp's and Manigault's brigades were in position in the order named from right to left, and numbered in all about 2,800 bayonets. The posites of persevering skill and courage were manifested daily upon other portions of our line along Brantley's, Sharp's and Manigault's front. In one instance Brantley's men, by rolling logs ahead of them and by digging zig-zag trenches, approached so duty on the part of their officers, worthy of the highest praise. To the brigade commanders (Deas, Brantley, Sharp and Manigault) I am specially indebted for their prompt obedience to every order and cheerful co-operation in every thing tending to
nd of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades of Mississippians, Deas' brigade okskillet road, my left on Utoy creek. Deas', Brantley's, Sharp's and Manigault's brigades were in p point on the line in front of Deas' left and Brantley's right-being favored by the conformation of d daily upon other portions of our line along Brantley's, Sharp's and Manigault's front. In one instance Brantley's men, by rolling logs ahead of them and by digging zig-zag trenches, approached so nest praise. To the brigade commanders (Deas, Brantley, Sharp and Manigault) I am specially indebtede first line. These were Sharp's, Deas', and Brantley's, from right to left in the order named. At The second line came up in rear of Deas and Brantley, but the ranks of the latter had been so thint arrive, I now proceeded along the line from Brantley's right towards Sharp's position. At this ticuous. After having rode along the line from Brantley's right-urging the officers and men to stand
J. W. Ratchford (search for this): chapter 27
ne, and efficiency the division can boast. To the staff, also, without exception, my thanks are due for that constant, intelligent, and efficient discharge of their respective duties which marked their conduct throughout the whole time of our official association. In the list of those who have thus performed well their parts are the names of Captain William G. Barth, A. A. G.; Captain E. F. Travis, A. A. G. and A. I. G.; Lieutenant W. M. Davidson, Aide-de-Camp; Major Hill, Acting Division Quartermaster; Captain P. Eggleston, Chief Commissary Subsistence for the Division; Private Simon Mayer, A. A. A. G.; and D. A. Kincheloe, Chief Surgeon of the Division. To the latter, as well as to Assistant Surgeon Lundy, I am personally much indebted for attentive and skilful treatment on the field and else. where. I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Patton Anderson, Major-General. Major J. W. Ratchford, Assistant Adjutant-General, Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee.
cordingly made. At about 9 o'clock P. M. each of our batteries delivered a few rounds for the purpose of ascertaining whether or not a reply could be elicited. With the exception of one or, perhaps, two pieces on my extreme left, there was no response along my whole front. Before daylight on the morning of the 27th our skirmishers occupied a portion of the enemy's main works without opposition. By direction of the Lieutenant-General commanding the corps, Deas' brigade, with Jackson's, of Bates' division, of Hardee's corps, Brigadier-General H. R. Jackson commanding the whole, were sent forward in pursuit on the Lickskillet road. They advanced cautiously a distance of six or seven miles to within a short distance of the Chattahoochee river, and, coming upon a force of the enemy deemed too strong to be assailed by the two brigades, the command was halted, and Brigadier-General Jackson reported the facts and awaited further instructions; whereupon the two brigades were directed by
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