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L. D. Alden (search for this): chapter 40
art. The marine battery, directed by Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond — the same who so conspicuously distinguished himself in the grand attack upon Port Hudson — and the gallant crew under him, did their work so effectively, soon after they began, that they had no gun to stand against them. At this juncture came out General Banks's call for a storming party of one thousand. Lieutenant Terry was among the foremost of the volunteers. Owing, however, to the assault being delayed, and Captain Alden, of the Richmond, having left on account of ill-health, Lieutenant Terry was commanded to return to his vessel. Though disappointed in his aim, his bravery was none the less conspicuous. Nothing can be more amusing than the notion the rebels seem to have of their utter invincibility. I mentioned before how my quondam friend, the captain, said he did not believe, even then, that Vicksburgh had capitulated. Another amusing instance came to my knowledge. News having reached us on the
Frank Gardner (search for this): chapter 40
very respectfully, your obedient servant, Frank Gardner, Major-General Commanding C. S. Forces. hulf, before Port Hudson, July 8. To Major-General Frank Gardner, Commanding C. S. Forces, Port Hudsrces, before Port Hudson July 8. To Major-General Frank Gardner, Commanding G. S. Forces, Port Hudsr's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. placed themselves in front of their men. General Gardner then said to General Andrews: General, I Five thousand prisoners, as stated by General Gardner himself. Serviceable: Three forty-two staff, with a full escort, accompanied by General Gardner and some of his officers, came up to Gened oppose a large one--but by the testimony of Gardner himself. It is really pleasurable to look ba of a previous disaster to the rebels. General Gardner also says that the very day our lines clo little sporting transaction which first gave Gardner an inkling of his position, and led to the co[7 more...]
Asbury Luce (search for this): chapter 40
the unsparing exertions and skilful dispositions of General Arnold, under whom the whole of this arm of the service was placed. Collateral praise must necessarily fall upon those faithful underworkers who, although unseen at the surface, have nevertheless the most mighty results depending upon the accuracy and promptness of their observations — I mean the Topographical Engineers under Major Houston. Foremost among these were Lieutenant Ulfers, Mr. Olt mans, Mr. Robins, and the lamented Mr. Luce, who was killed a short time ago while in the act of taking an observation. The enormous amount of personal hardships and dangers these gentlemen have to undergo, after going far ahead of the army and little exploring expeditions of their own in the enemy's country — the coolness and self-possession which their services require of them in every emergency, are things of which few people probably think, but which, nevertheless, have the most momentous bearing upon the success or failure of a
e cannot speak too highly of the unsparing exertions and skilful dispositions of General Arnold, under whom the whole of this arm of the service was placed. Collateral praise must necessarily fall upon those faithful underworkers who, although unseen at the surface, have nevertheless the most mighty results depending upon the accuracy and promptness of their observations — I mean the Topographical Engineers under Major Houston. Foremost among these were Lieutenant Ulfers, Mr. Olt mans, Mr. Robins, and the lamented Mr. Luce, who was killed a short time ago while in the act of taking an observation. The enormous amount of personal hardships and dangers these gentlemen have to undergo, after going far ahead of the army and little exploring expeditions of their own in the enemy's country — the coolness and self-possession which their services require of them in every emergency, are things of which few people probably think, but which, nevertheless, have the most momentous bearing upon
Charles P. Stone (search for this): chapter 40
k this morning, for the purpose of agreeing upon and drawing up the terms of surrender. In reply I have the honor to state that I have designated Brigadier-General Charles P. Stone, Colonel Henry W. Birge, and Lieutenant-Colonel Richard B. Irwin as the officers to meet the commission appointed by you. They will meet your officeded of the garrison will be cared for by the authorities of the United States, assisted, if desired, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of well-developed dark-brown beard and moustache, and of quite a martial bearing. When the ceremonies of a formal surrender were over, he came, in company with General Stone, to make a call on General Augur, on his way to the headquarters of General Banks. He and his staff seemed to be quite at home, and nobody, in looking at them
Doc. 38.-capture of Port Hudson. Official correspondence. headquarters of the nineteenth army corps, Department of the Gulf, Port Hudson, July 9. General: I have the honor to inform you that Port Hudson surrendered yesterday morning without conditions. We took possession at seven o'clock this morning. The number of prisoners and guns is unknown as yet, but is estimated at five thousand prisoners and fifty pieces of artillery. Very respectfully, Brigadier-General W. H. Emory, Commanding Defences of New-Orleans. Richardb. Irwin, A. A. General. To Major-General Banks, Commanding United States Forces near Port Hudson: headquarters Port Hudson, La., July 7. General: Having received information from your troops that Vicksburgh has been surrendered, I make this communication to ask you to give me the official assurance whether this is true or not, and if true I ask for a cessation of hositilities with a view to the consideration of terms for surrendering this position.
Charles C. Grover (search for this): chapter 40
e less conspicuous. Nothing can be more amusing than the notion the rebels seem to have of their utter invincibility. I mentioned before how my quondam friend, the captain, said he did not believe, even then, that Vicksburgh had capitulated. Another amusing instance came to my knowledge. News having reached us on the seventh instant of the fall of Vicksburgh, Colonel Nelson, commanding the colored regiment on our right, received official intelligence of the same from his commander, General Grover. It appears that Colonel Nelson's approaches upon the enemy had got so very close-only twenty feet apart — that, by mutual concession, they had stopped the murderous work of perpetually shooting at each other, and the officers and men used to come out from the opposite sides and have quite a pleasant confab. This had gone on for three days, hourly expecting the order for an assault. When Nelson got his delightful information, happening to meet a rebel colonel, he told him the fact
e, and Dixie came borne upon the morning air — never sounding sweeter. At seven o'clock, General Andrews, Chief of the Staff of General Banks, made his grand entrance into the rebel fortificationsem on one side of the road, their backs to the river. General Gardner then advanced toward General Andrews, and, in a few accompanying words, offered to surrender his sword with Port Hudson; but GenGeneral Andrews told him that, in appreciation of his bravery — however misdirected — he was at liberty to retain his sword. Our men were then drawn up in two lines on the other side of the road, oppels, and our officers placed themselves in front of their men. General Gardner then said to General Andrews: General, I will now formally surrender my command to you, and for that purpose will give the orders to ground arms. The order was given and the arms were grounded. After that General Andrews sent for the enemy's general officers, staff and field-officers. The line-officers were left <
med you how, step by step, we were encroaching upon the enemy, until all resistance would be useless. Some — where about midnight of the seventh, a Lieutenant of Holcomb's battery came to the tent of Major-General Augur's Assistant Adjutant-General, and said that the enemy were sounding a bugle, which foreboded he knew not what. dispensed with; but to whom the country is no less indebted — taking the will for the deed. These were followed by two picked regiments from each division, with Holcomb's and Rawle's battery of light artillery, and the gunners of the naval battery. The rebels were drawn up in line, and an immense line they made, their officersfortifications to the land side, every thing told of the terrible efficiency of our artillery, which never did its work better. Foremost among these were Mack's, Holcomb's, and Rawle's batteries, the Indiana battery, and the naval battery of heavy guns, under the gallant Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond, and his fine crew, who se
much we owe the artillery, we cannot speak too highly of the unsparing exertions and skilful dispositions of General Arnold, under whom the whole of this arm of the service was placed. Collateral praise must necessarily fall upon those faithful underworkers who, although unseen at the surface, have nevertheless the most mighty results depending upon the accuracy and promptness of their observations — I mean the Topographical Engineers under Major Houston. Foremost among these were Lieutenant Ulfers, Mr. Olt mans, Mr. Robins, and the lamented Mr. Luce, who was killed a short time ago while in the act of taking an observation. The enormous amount of personal hardships and dangers these gentlemen have to undergo, after going far ahead of the army and little exploring expeditions of their own in the enemy's country — the coolness and self-possession which their services require of them in every emergency, are things of which few people probably think, but which, nevertheless, have t
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