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Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.29
you ready, General Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jackson. A nod from Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods rang with the bugle call, and back came the responses from bugles on the right and left, and the long line of skirmishers, through the wild thicket of undergrowth, sprang Stonewall Jackson's old Sorrel. This picture is from a photograph taken at the Maryland State Fair at Hagerstown, in 1884. At that time Old Sorrel was thought to be about thirty-four years old. At the fair, relic-hunters plucked away much of his mane and tail.--editors. eagerly to their work, followed promptly by the quick steps of the line of battle. For a moment all the troops seemed buried in the depths of the gloomy forest, and then suddenly the echoes waked and swept the country for miles, never failing until heard at the headquarters of Hooker at Chancellorsville — the wild rebel yell of the
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.29
t Talley's, a mile farther west, was the Eleventh Corps, under General Howard. General Fitz Lee, with cavalry scouts, had advanced until he had view of the position of Howard's corps, and found them unsuspicious of attack. Reaching the Orange Plank road, General Jackson himself rode with Fitz Lee to reconnoiter the position of Howard, and then sent the Stonewall brigade of Virginia troops, under Brigadier-General Paxton, to hold the point where the Germanna Plank road obliquely enters the Orange road. Leading the main column of his force farther on the Brock road to the old turnpike, the head of the column turned sharply eastward toward Chancellorsville. [See maps, pp. 158, 191.] About a mile had been passed, when he halted and began the disposition of his forces to attack Howard. Rodes's division, at the head of the column, was thrown into line of battle, with Colston's forming the second line and A. P. Hill's the third, while the artillery under Colonel Stapleton Crutchfield mo
Catherine Furnace (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.29
elds, and through the woodlands! What spirit was imparted to the line, and what cheers rolled along its length, when Jackson, and then Lee himself, appeared riding abreast of the line along the Plank road! Slowly but steadily the line advanced, until at night-fall all Federal pickets and skirmishers were driven back upon the body of Hooker's force at Chancellorsville. Here we reached a point, a mile and a half from Hooker's lines, where a road turns down to the left toward the old Catherine Furnace [see map, p. 158]; and here at the fork of the roads General Lee and General Jackson spent the night, resting on the pine straw, curtained only by the close shadow of the pine forest. A little after night-fall I was sent by General Lee upon an errand to General A. P. Hill, on the old stone turnpike a mile or two north; and returning some time later with information of matters on our right, I found General Jackson retired to rest, and General Lee sleeping at the foot of a tree, covered
ery inch all that he appeared. Upon the right of Rodes sat Major Blackford. Are you ready, General Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jackson. A nod from Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods rang with the bugle call, and back came the responses from bugles on the right and left, and the long line of skirmishers, through the wild thicket of undergrowth, sprang Stonewall Jackson's old Sorrel. This picture is from a photograph taken at the Maryland State Fair at Hagerstown, in 1884. At that time Old Sorrel was thought to be about thirty-four years old. At the fair, relic-hunters plucked away much of his mane and tail.--editors. eagerly to their work, followed promptly by the quick steps of the line of battle. For a moment all the troops seemed buried in the depths of the gloomy forest, and then suddenly the echoes waked and swept the country for miles, never failing until h
C. H. Howard (search for this): chapter 3.29
Federal force found here and at Talley's, a mile farther west, was the Eleventh Corps, under General Howard. General Fitz Lee, with cavalry scouts, had advanced until he had view of the position of HoHoward's corps, and found them unsuspicious of attack. Reaching the Orange Plank road, General Jackson himself rode with Fitz Lee to reconnoiter the position of Howard, and then sent the Stonewall brHoward, and then sent the Stonewall brigade of Virginia troops, under Brigadier-General Paxton, to hold the point where the Germanna Plank road obliquely enters the Orange road. Leading the main column of his force farther on the Brock r] About a mile had been passed, when he halted and began the disposition of his forces to attack Howard. Rodes's division, at the head of the column, was thrown into line of battle, with Colston's fooague and Palmer, and all the rest, ready to bark loud and deep with half a chance? Alas! for Howard and his unformed lines, and his brigades with guns stacked, and officers at dinner or asleep und
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 3.29
Stonewall Jackson's last battle. by the Rev. James power Smith, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-Ghe morning of the 29th of April, 1863, Stonewall Jackson's cap. Major Jed. Hotchkiss, who owns the old gray cap, writes that Jackson wore it through the Valley, Seven Days, and Second Manassas ormation of matters on our right, I found General Jackson retired to rest, and General Lee sleepingcognize the figures of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. Who can tell the story of that quiet csite of our night's bivouac, to find that General Jackson and his staff had followed the marching chad swept the two miles of battle-field. General Jackson is just ahead on the road, Captain, said few moments farther on I met Captain Stonewall Jackson going forward on the Plank road in advanre eye-witnesses and near companions. When Jackson had reached the point where his line now crosnding on the porch. The picture faces south; Jackson attacked the Eleventh Corps from the left (we[15 more...]
Ambrose P. Hill (search for this): chapter 3.29
and McLaws's, and Jackson's corps, consisting of four divisions, A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's, commanded by Rodes, Trimble's, commanded by Cols after night-fall I was sent by General Lee upon an errand to General A. P. Hill, on the old stone turnpike a mile or two north; and returningn into line of battle, with Colston's forming the second line and A. P. Hill's the third, while the artillery under Colonel Stapleton Crutchfiere could be no mistake and no failure. And there were Rodes and A. P. Hill. Had they not seen and cheered, as long and as loud as they were in advance of his line of battle. Murray Taylor, an aide of A. P. Hill's, with tidings that Jackson and Hill were wounded, and some arou E. Colston, C. S. A. From a photograph. Jackson had ordered A. P. Hill's division, his third and reserve line, to be placed in front. Worps. Laid upon the ground, there came at once to his succor General A. P. Hill and members of his staff. The writer reached his side a minu
Thomas Jonathan Jackson (search for this): chapter 3.29
rginia State Library, is here given in fac-simile: Facsimile of dispatch. Lieutenant-General Thomas Jonathan Jackson, C. S. A. From a photograph taken in Winchester, Va., in 1862. The place f Howard's corps, and found them unsuspicious of attack. Reaching the Orange Plank road, General Jackson himself rode with Fitz Lee to reconnoiter the position of Howard, and then sent the Stonewad, when these dispositions were completed. Upon his stout-built, long-paced little sorrel, General Jackson sat, with visor low over his eyes and lips compressed, and with his watch in his hand. Upo appeared. Upon the right of Rodes sat Major Blackford. Are you ready, General Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jackson.Jackson. A nod from Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods rang with the bugle call, and back came the responses from bugles on the right and left, and the long line of skirmish
This picture is from a photograph taken at a reunion of Union and Confederate officers and soldiers in May, 1884. The original house (see p. 190) was set on fire by Confederate shells on Sunday, May 3d, shortly after Hooker was injured while standing on the porch. The picture faces south; Jackson attacked the Eleventh Corps from the left (west) by the Plank road, which passes in front of tie Chancellor House. The cross-road in the foreground leads northward to Ely's Ford and United States Ford. See map, p. 158.--editors. Again we resorted to the litter, and with difficulty bore it through the bush, and then under a hot fire along the road. Soon an ambulance was reached, and stopping to seek some stimulant at Chancellor's (Dowdall's Tavern), we were found by Dr. McGuire, who at once took charge of the wounded man. Passing back over the battle-field of the afternoon, we reached the Wilderness store, and then, in a field on the north, the field-hospital of our corps under Dr. H
day, with symptoms of pneumonia and some pains of pleurisy, until, at 3:15 P. M. on the quiet of the Sabbath afternoon, May 10th, 1863, he raised himself from his bed, saying, No, no, let us pass over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees ; and, falling again to his pillow, he passed away, over the river, where, in a land where warfare is not known or feared, he rests forever under the trees. His shattered arm was buried in the family burying-ground of the Ellwood place--Major J. H. Lacy's — near his last battle-field. His body rests, as he himself asked, in Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. The spot where he was so fatally wounded in the shades of the Wilderness is marked by a large quartz rock, placed there by the care of his chaplain and friend, the Rev. Dr. B. T. Lacy, and the latter's brother, Major Lacy. Others must tell the story of Confederate victory at Chancellorsville. It has been mine only, as in the movement of that time, so with my pen now, to
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