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Teneriffe (Spain) (search for this): chapter 12.90
airs. Here she was found by the Niagara and Sacramento, under Commodore T. T. Craven, who took up a position in the adjoining port of Coruña. On the 24th of March the Stonewall steamed out of Ferrol and lay for several hours off the entrance of Corufia; Craven, however, declined to join battle, under the belief that the odds against him were too great, although the Niagara carried ten heavy rifles, and the Sacramento two 11-inch guns. The Stonewall steamed that night to Lisbon, thence to Teneriffe and Nassau, and finally to Havana. It was now the middle of May, and the Confederacy was breaking up; Captain Page therefore made an agreement with the Captain-General of Cuba, by which the latter advanced $16,000 to pay off his officers and men and received possession of the vessel. She was subsequently turned over to the United States, and finally sold to Japan. Another cruiser, the Tallahassee, was originally the English blockade-runner Atlanta, and made two trips from Bermuda to W
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
f-war in April and May, 1861, and, under the command of Captain Raphael Semmes, escaped from the Mississippi early in July, after an unsuccessful chase by the Brooklyn, which was at the time blockading the mouth of the river. Her cruise lasted six months, during which she made fifteen prizes. Of these seven were destroyed, one was ransomed, one recaptured, and the remaining six were sent into Cienfuegos, where they were released by the Cuban authorities. In January the Sumter arrived at Gibraltar, where she was laid up and finally sold. The Confederate Government early recognized that in order to attack the commerce of the United States with any hope of success it must procure cruisers abroad. For this purpose it sent several agents to Europe. The foremost of these was Captain James D. Bulloch, of the Confederate navy, who arrived in England and established himself at Liverpool in June, 1861. Having satisfied himself as to the scope and bearing of the neutrality laws, he lost
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
h ran the blockade into Wilmington. On the 29th of October the Tallahassee, now called the Olustee, made another short cruise along the coast as far as Sandy Hook, under Lieutenant Ward, making seven prizes, and returning again to Wilmington after a slight brush with the blockading vessels. Her battery was now removed, and, after a fictitious sale to the navy agent at Wilmington, she was renamed the Chameleon. She sailed with a cargo of cotton on December 24th, while the first attack on Fort Fisher was in progress. Captain John Wilkinson of the navy commanded her, and his object was to obtain supplies at Bermuda for Lee's army. She returned late in January, but was unable to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, and after landing her stores at Nassau she proceeded to Liverpool. Here she was seized by the authorities, and ultimately she was delivered to the United States. The last of the Confederate commerce-destroyers was the Sea King, or Shenandoah. Commander John M. Brooke
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
ng again to Wilmington after a slight brush with the blockading vessels. Her battery was now removed, and, after a fictitious sale to the navy agent at Wilmington, she was renamed the Chameleon. She sailed with a cargo of cotton on December 24th, while the first attack on Fort Fisher was in progress. Captain John Wilkinson of the navy commanded her, and his object was to obtain supplies at Bermuda for Lee's army. She returned late in January, but was unable to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, and after landing her stores at Nassau she proceeded to Liverpool. Here she was seized by the authorities, and ultimately she was delivered to the United States. The last of the Confederate commerce-destroyers was the Sea King, or Shenandoah. Commander John M. Brooke, the Confederate ordnance officer at Richmond, devised the plan which was afterward adopted on her cruise. Brooke's service in the North Pacific Exploring Expedition of 1855 had familiarized him with the movements of th
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
865, two months after the Confederacy had virtually passed out of existence, it may be characterized as the most useless act of hostility that occurred during the whole war. The first intimation received by Waddell of the progress of events at home was on June 22d, when the captain of one of the whalers told him that he believed the war was over; the statement was, however, unsupported by other evidence, and Waddell declined to believe it. On the 23d he received from one of his prizes San Francisco newspapers of a sufficiently late date to contain news of the fall of Richmond. The war was not yet ended, however, and subsequently to the receipt of these newspapers fifteen whalers were destroyed. On the 28th, the work of destroying the fleet having been completed, Waddell started to return home. On his way southward, on August 2d, he met the British bark Barracouta, from which he received positive information that the Confederacy was at an end ; he thereupon dismounted his battery
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
nto the Florida, striking her on the starboard quarter, cutting down her bulwarks and carrying away her mizzenmast. As the Wachusett backed off, and the Florida was clearly not in a sinking condition, Collins fired one or two volleys of small-arms, and also two discharges from his heavy guns, upon which the Florida surrendered. At the time of the capture, the captain and a large part of the crew of the Florida were on shore; the remainder were taken prisoners. The Florida was taken to Hampton Roads, where she was afterward sunk by collision with a transport. The United States made the amende honorable to Brazil, and Captain Collins was tried by court-martial. The second cruiser built in England, through the agency of Captain Bulloch, was the Alabama, whose career is described in another place. [See p. 600.] Notwithstanding the very urgent representations of Mr. Adams, accompanied by depositions which left no doubt as to the character and objects of the vessel, she was permitte
Bombay (Maharashtra, India) (search for this): chapter 12.90
sel built for the Bombay trade, which had made only one voyage; and in September she was purchased, her ostensible owner being a British subject who acted privately as Bulloch's agent. On the 8th of October the Sea King cleared from London for Bombay, carrying coal as ballast, and with Lieutenant Whittle of the Confederate navy on board as a passenger. On the same day the Laurel, a fast steamer, purchased ostensibly for a blockade-runner, sailed from Liverpool with a cargo containing six gunwhere the passengers and cargo were transferred, and the Sea King was put in commission as the Confederate States ship Shenandoah, under the command of Waddell. Contrary to his expectation, most of the seamen who had been shipped for a voyage to Bombay refused to join the Shenandoah's crew when her real character was known. She was therefore obliged to start with only 23 seamen instead of 120, which was her complement. The Shenandoah proceeded first to Melbourne. On her way she met nine Am
English Channel (search for this): chapter 12.90
Of the four corvettes, two were bought by Prussia and two by Peru. One of the rams was sold to Prussia and the other, known as the Sphinx, to Denmark. Before her arrival in Copenhagen the Schleswig-Holstein war was over, and the Danes, having no use for her, were well satisfied to have her taken off their hands without inquiring too closely into the character of the purchaser. In this way Bulloch got possession of her, and on the 30th of January, 1865, she was commissioned in the English Channel as the Stonewall, and started on a cruise under Captain T. J. Page. The Stonewall had not gone far before she sprang a leak and put into Ferrol for repairs. Here she was found by the Niagara and Sacramento, under Commodore T. T. Craven, who took up a position in the adjoining port of Coruña. On the 24th of March the Stonewall steamed out of Ferrol and lay for several hours off the entrance of Corufia; Craven, however, declined to join battle, under the belief that the odds against h
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
; presumably for the Italian Government. She was a duplicate of the gun-vessels of the English navy. The construction of the vessel proceeded without interruption during the fall and winter of 1861-62. The American Minister, Mr. Charles Francis Adams, twice called the attention of the Foreign Office to her suspected character, and pro forma inquiries were set on foot, but they failed to show evidence of her real destination. The Oreto therefore cleared without difficulty for Palermo and Jamaica, a Liverpool merchant, representing the Palermo firm, having sworn that he was the owner, and an English captain having been appointed to the command. On the 22d of March the vessel sailed from Liverpool. At the same time the steamer Bahama left Hartlepool for Nassau, carrying the Oreto's battery. The new cruiser arrived at Nassau April 28th, consigned to Adderly & Co., the Confederate agents at that port, and a few days later she was joined by the Bahama. The consignees immediately s
Copenhagen (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 12.90
of John Bigelow, Consul-General at Paris. The letters formed a complete exposure of the business, and the Government was forced to interpose; and although during the next six months the work of construction was permitted to go on, at the end of that time the ships were ordered to be sold under penalty of seizure. Of the four corvettes, two were bought by Prussia and two by Peru. One of the rams was sold to Prussia and the other, known as the Sphinx, to Denmark. Before her arrival in Copenhagen the Schleswig-Holstein war was over, and the Danes, having no use for her, were well satisfied to have her taken off their hands without inquiring too closely into the character of the purchaser. In this way Bulloch got possession of her, and on the 30th of January, 1865, she was commissioned in the English Channel as the Stonewall, and started on a cruise under Captain T. J. Page. The Stonewall had not gone far before she sprang a leak and put into Ferrol for repairs. Here she was fo
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