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Brazil (Brazil) (search for this): chapter 12.92
ships and cargoes, up to March 15th, 1872, was $19,782,917.60, all but about six millions of it being charged to the account of the Alabama and Shenandoah. On May 8th, 1871, the Treaty of Washington was concluded, in accordance with which a Tribunal of Arbitration was appointed, which assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses, as well as for the actual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and cargoes. The Tr
Blakely (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.92
ok effect: That is a good one! Down, boys! Give her another like the last! Now we have her! and so on, cheering and shouting to the end. After the Kearsarge had been exposed to an uninterrupted cannonade for eighteen minutes, a 68-pounder Blakely shell passed through the starboard bulwarks below the main rigging, exploded upon the quarter-deck, and wounded three of the crew of the after pivot-gun. With these exceptions, not an officer or man received serious injury. The three unfortunad strength of his ship, as shown by the eagerness and dash with which he opened the fight. The prisoners declared that the best practice during the action was by the gunners who had been trained on board the Excellent in Portsmouth harbor. The Blakely rifle was the most effective gun. The Alabama fought bravely until she could no longer fight or float. The contest was decided by the superiority of the 11-inch Dahlgrens, especially the after-pivot, together with the coolness and accuracy of
Dubris (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.92
elled absent officers and men to return to the ship. Steam was raised, and as soon as we were off, and all hands called, Captain Winslow gave the welcome news of a telegram from Mr. Dayton, our minister to France, announcing that the Alabama had arrived the day previous at Cherbourg; hence the urgency of departure, the probability of an encounter, and the expectation of her capture or destruction. The crew responded with cheers. The succeeding day witnessed the arrival of the Kearsarge at Dover for dispatches, and the day after (Tuesday) her appearance off Cherbourg, where we saw the Confederate flag flying within the breakwater. As we approached, officers and men gathered in groups on deck, and looked intently at the daring rover that had been able for two years to escape numerous foes and to inflict immense damage on our commerce. She was a beautiful specimen of naval architecture. The surgeon went on shore and obtained pratique (permission to visit the port) for boats. Owing
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.92
The duel between the Alabama and the Kearsarge. by John M. Browne, Surgeon of the Kearsarge. Deck of a ship. On Sunday, the 12th of June, 1864, the Kearsarge, Captain John A. Winslow, was lying at anchor in the Scheldt, off Flushing, Hh, quartermaster of the Kearsarge Ani Captain of the after pivot-gun, which it was said inflicted the most damage on the Alabama, from a photograph taken in 1864. keeping on a line nearer the shore, and with a few well-directed shots hastened the sr with a feeble voice. When a wounded shipmate on Close of the combat-the Kearsarge getting into position to Rake the Alabama. either side of him complained, he reproved him, saying, Am I not worse hurt than you? and I am satisfied, for we a Gouin. His name was honorably mentioned, his behavior eulogized, and his memory drunk in silence. The boat from the Alabama announcing the surrender and asking for assistance. The picture shows shot-marks in the thin deal covering of the cha
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.92
0 h. p. Tonnage10401031 note.--Twelve Confederate cruisers figured in the so-called Alabama Claims settlement with England. Named in the order of the damage inflicted by each, these cruisers were: the Alabama, Shenandoah, Florida, TallahasseeCharles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented bGreat Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses, as well as for the actual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and cargoes. The Tribunal decided that England was in no way responsible for the $1,781,915.43 of losses inflicted by the Tallahassee, Georgia, Chickamauga, Nashville, Retribution, Jeff. Davis, Sallie, Boston, and Sumter; and on September 14th, 1872, it awarded $15,500,000 d
Geneva (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 12.92
ms for ships and cargoes filed up to March 15th, 1872) were only about $400,000 greater than those inflicted by the Shenandoah. The sum total of the claims filed against the twelve cruisers for ships and cargoes, up to March 15th, 1872, was $19,782,917.60, all but about six millions of it being charged to the account of the Alabama and Shenandoah. On May 8th, 1871, the Treaty of Washington was concluded, in accordance with which a Tribunal of Arbitration was appointed, which assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison
Portsmouth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.92
long to the Royal naval Reserve. Captain Semmes said, Mr. Kell, my first lieutenant, deserves great credit for the fine condition in which the ship went into action with regard to her battery, magazine, and shell-rooms ; and he assuredly had confidence in the speed and strength of his ship, as shown by the eagerness and dash with which he opened the fight. The prisoners declared that the best practice during the action was by the gunners who had been trained on board the Excellent in Portsmouth harbor. The Blakely rifle was the most effective gun. The Alabama fought bravely until she could no longer fight or float. The contest was decided by the superiority of the 11-inch Dahlgrens, especially the after-pivot, together with the coolness and accuracy of aim of the gunners of the Kearsarge, and notably by the skill of William Smith, the captain of the after-pivot, who in style and behavior was like Long Tom Coffin in Cooper's Pilot. To the disparagement of Captain Winslow it h
Southampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.92
merchantmen, riddled through and through, and as she disappeared to her last resting-place there was no cheer; all was silent. The yacht lowered her two boats, rescued Captain Semmes (wounded in the hand by broken iron rigging), First Lieutenant Kell, twelve officers, and twenty-six men, leaving the rest of the survivors to the two boats of the Kearsarge. Apparently aware that the forty persons he had rescued would be claimed, Mr. Lancaster steamed away as fast as he could, direct for Southampton, without waiting for such surgical assistance as the Kearsarge might render. Captain Winslow permitted the yacht to secure his prisoners, anticipating their subsequent surrender. Again his confidence was misplaced, and he afterward wrote: It was my mistake at the moment that I could not recognize an enemy who, under the garb of a friend, was affording assistance. The aid of the yacht, it is presumed, was asked in a spirit of chivalry, for the Kearsarge, comparatively uninjured, with bu
William Gouin (search for this): chapter 12.92
ught on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saveaction every man on the sick-list went to his station. The Kearsarge had three wounded, of whom one died in the hospital a few days after the fight. This was William Gouin, ordinary seaman, whose behavior during and after battle was worthy of the highest praise. Stationed at the after pivot-gun he was seriously wounded in the le and lamented his death. At a dinner given by loyal Americans in Paris to Captain Winslow and two of his officers, a telegram was received announcing the death of Gouin. His name was honorably mentioned, his behavior eulogized, and his memory drunk in silence. The boat from the Alabama announcing the surrender and asking for a
ction; but the doubters were half convinced when the so-called challenge was known to read as follows: C. S. S. Alabama, Cherbourg, June 14th, 1864. To A. Bonfils, Esq., Cherbourg. Sir: I hear that you were informed by the U. S. Consul that the Kearsarge was to come to this port solely for the prisoners landed by me, andart before I am ready to go out. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, R. Semmes, Captain. This communication was sent by Mr. Bonfils, the Confederate States Commercial Agent, to Mr. Liais, the United States Commercial Agent, with a request that the latter would furnish a copy to Captain Winslbat. The letter that passed between the commercial agents was the challenge about which so much has been said. Captain Semmes informed Captain Winslow through Mr. Bonfils of his intention to fight; Captain Winslow informed Captain Semmes through Mr. Liais that he came to Cherbourg to fight, and had no intention of leaving. He ma
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