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Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.33
strike at the rear of Richmond. On the 5th of June Grant detached two divisions of his cavalry under Sheridan toward Gordonsville to destroy the railroad communications between Richmond and Gordonsville and Lynchburg, and possibly to form a junctioGordonsville and Lynchburg, and possibly to form a junction with Hunter. My brigade consisted of the 4th, 5th, and 6th South Carolina Cavalry, then recently transferred from the sea-coast of South Carolina, where they had seen little active service in the field; and this, with Young's and Rosser's brigadCobb Legion (General Young being absent, wounded), were in advance of my brigade, and camped higher up the road toward Gordonsville. Besides his own division Hampton had Fitzhugh Lee's, consisting of Wickham's and Lomax's brigades, and this divisionlarge oak-tree, I found some ambulances parked and the wounded being cared for. Meantime Rosser had thundered down the Gordonsville road, charged and scattered Custer's forces, and, together with Major-General Thomas L. Rosser, C. S. A. From a pho
David Thomson (search for this): chapter 4.33
osser's brigades filling up the space to the right, with two batteries of horse artillery of four guns each — Hart's and Thomson's — stationed at convenient points on the line. In this position I awaited Sheridan's attack, having kept scouts welld dark five distinct and determined assaults were made upon us, making seven in all. I had placed two brass howitzers of Thomson's battery just in the rear of our line, not far to the right of the angle, in the open field. As there was no protectioommanding the artillery battalion, to have the survivors withdrawn to a place of safety, and had to rely upon Hart's and Thomson's guns stationed farther to the right. The attacking forces would spread out, and at times open fire along our entire fents and three battalions. The horse artillery, with Hampton at Trevilian, were three batteries, Hart's South Carolina, Thomson's Virginia, and one other Virginia battery. The strength of Hampton's forces cannot be given accurately, but is estimat
Charles P. Wickham (search for this): chapter 4.33
atter under command of Colonel Wright of the Cobb Legion (General Young being absent, wounded), were in advance of my brigade, and camped higher up the road toward Gordonsville. Besides his own division Hampton had Fitzhugh Lee's, consisting of Wickham's and Lomax's brigades, and this division was in our rear, toward Louisa Court House. On the night of the 10th my orders were to be prepared the next morning at daylight for action. Accordingly at the dawn of day we were mounted and drawn upnies; Young's brigade, Cobb's Legion, ten companies; Phillips Legion, six companies.; Jeff Davis Legion, four companies; 7th Georgia Cavalry, ten companies, and Millen's Georgia battalion, four companies. Fitzhugh Lee's division was composed of Wickham's brigade, the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th Virginia; Lomax's brigade, the 5th, 6th, and 15th Virginia, making for the two divisions, thirteen regiments and three battalions. The horse artillery, with Hampton at Trevilian, were three batteries, Hart's
Horatio G. Wright (search for this): chapter 4.33
urt House, and bivouacked not far from Trevilian Station. Rosser's and Young's brigades, the latter under command of Colonel Wright of the Cobb Legion (General Young being absent, wounded), were in advance of my brigade, and camped higher up the roal the enemy had doubled on my left flank, when I sent to the rear for Young's brigade. On the arrival of the head of Colonel Wright's column, dismounted, I directed him to Colonel Rutledge, whose regiment, the 4th South Carolina, was on the left, anht, where Colonel Aiken was stationed with the 6th South Carolina, as I supposed it was protected by Lee's division. Colonel Wright had some difficulty in the thick undergrowth in finding his position on Rutledge's left, the enemy meantime pounding railroad near Denny's house, about a mile above Trevilian Station; Rutledge on the left, Young's, still commanded by Colonel Wright, in the center, and Rosser's on the right. The line formed an obtuse angle on the railroad embankment, and extended
G. A. Custer (search for this): chapter 4.33
t, and the stubborn fight had been kept up at close quarters for several hours, I received information from the rear that Custer, with a column, had moved by an open road to my right, around my right flank, and had captured some of my ambulances, whes parked and the wounded being cared for. Meantime Rosser had thundered down the Gordonsville road, charged and scattered Custer's forces, and, together with Major-General Thomas L. Rosser, C. S. A. From a photograph. a charge by Captain Calhoun's squadron, recaptured what he had taken, and besides got possession of Custer's headquarters ambulances and a number of his horses and men. While I was massing my command near this field infirmary I received orders from division headquarters to take the Phillips Legion of Young's brigade and charge the crossing of the railroad. This I did, and drove a part of Custer's brigade in confusion into a field beyond. About the time I had reached the railroad I was recalled to the point from which we
William H. Young (search for this): chapter 4.33
n little active service in the field; and this, with Young's and Rosser's brigades, constituted Hampton's divisuacked not far from Trevilian Station. Rosser's and Young's brigades, the latter under command of Colonel Wright of the Cobb Legion (General Young being absent, wounded), were in advance of my brigade, and camped higher uhen I moved in from the railroad, that he would hold Young's brigade in readiness to reenforce my line as the eoubled on my left flank, when I sent to the rear for Young's brigade. On the arrival of the head of Colonel Wrdivision headquarters to take the Phillips Legion of Young's brigade and charge the crossing of the railroad. mile above Trevilian Station; Rutledge on the left, Young's, still commanded by Colonel Wright, in the center,lina regiments to its left along the embankment, and Young's and Rosser's brigades filling up the space to the th Virginia, and White's battalion of two companies; Young's brigade, Cobb's Legion, ten companies; Phillips Le
Hugh K. Aiken (search for this): chapter 4.33
ent to the rear for Young's brigade. On the arrival of the head of Colonel Wright's column, dismounted, I directed him to Colonel Rutledge, whose regiment, the 4th South Carolina, was on the left, and paid little attention to my right, where Colonel Aiken was stationed with the 6th South Carolina, as I supposed it was protected by Lee's division. Colonel Wright had some difficulty in the thick undergrowth in finding his position on Rutledge's left, the enemy meantime pounding us with all his be understood as disparaging others, for I am confining this narrative to my own command. The next morning, the 12th of June, General Hampton placed me in command of his division. The command of my brigade devolved upon Colonel Rutledge. Colonel Aiken had been severely wounded in the engagement of the day before. Early in the forenoon I posted the division on the railroad near Denny's house, about a mile above Trevilian Station; Rutledge on the left, Young's, still commanded by Colonel Wr
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 4.33
road toward Gordonsville. Besides his own division Hampton had Fitzhugh Lee's, consisting of Wickham's and Lomuctions. Whereupon he proposed that we ride to General Hampton's headquarters at Netherland's house, about halvilian, and, if possible, ascertain his plans. General Hampton informed us he expected to form a junction with Sheridan. Rosser returned to his command, and General Hampton and I rode from Netherland's toward Clayton's S the enemy, by whom he had just been driven in. General Hampton then ordered me to bring up my brigade and attary moment to form a junction with Fitzhugh Lee. General Hampton also informed me, when I moved in from the railmy ambulances, whereupon I received orders from General Hampton to withdraw and mount my command. This was eascommand. The next morning, the 12th of June, General Hampton placed me in command of his division. The commts and three battalions. The horse artillery, with Hampton at Trevilian, were three batteries, Hart's South Ca
Thomas L. Rosser (search for this): chapter 4.33
rvice in the field; and this, with Young's and Rosser's brigades, constituted Hampton's division. O, mounted infantry, but for our sabers. General Rosser rode down to my bivouac about sunrise and yton's Store, where he would engage Sheridan. Rosser returned to his command, and General Hampton arked and the wounded being cared for. Meantime Rosser had thundered down the Gordonsville road, charer's forces, and, together with Major-General Thomas L. Rosser, C. S. A. From a photograph. a chd early in the day, and formed a junction with Rosser, and kept up the contest until nightfall. Md and worn-out animals but bearded wheat. General Rosser was severely wounded in the leg late in thommanded by Colonel Wright, in the center, and Rosser's on the right. The line formed an obtuse angits left along the embankment, and Young's and Rosser's brigades filling up the space to the right, brigade, the 4th, 5th, and 6th South Carolina; Rosser's brigade, 7th, 11th, and 12th Virginia, and W[1 more...]
Lunsford L. Lomax (search for this): chapter 4.33
ommand of Colonel Wright of the Cobb Legion (General Young being absent, wounded), were in advance of my brigade, and camped higher up the road toward Gordonsville. Besides his own division Hampton had Fitzhugh Lee's, consisting of Wickham's and Lomax's brigades, and this division was in our rear, toward Louisa Court House. On the night of the 10th my orders were to be prepared the next morning at daylight for action. Accordingly at the dawn of day we were mounted and drawn up in column ofPhillips Legion, six companies.; Jeff Davis Legion, four companies; 7th Georgia Cavalry, ten companies, and Millen's Georgia battalion, four companies. Fitzhugh Lee's division was composed of Wickham's brigade, the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th Virginia; Lomax's brigade, the 5th, 6th, and 15th Virginia, making for the two divisions, thirteen regiments and three battalions. The horse artillery, with Hampton at Trevilian, were three batteries, Hart's South Carolina, Thomson's Virginia, and one other Vir
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