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Benton, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
illed several men and horses. They met with skirmishers only, and on the next day were in the neighborhood of Spanish Fort, seven miles due east from Mobile. Canby perceived the necessity of reducing this work before passing on to Blakely; and, on the following morning, March 27. before ten o'clock, it was completely invested, on the land side. The divisions of Carr and McArthur, of the Sixteenth Corps, were, at first, on the right, the extreme of the former resting on Bayou Minette, and Benton's division of the Thirteenth Corps, was on the left, its extreme touching at Belle Rose. The remainder of the Sixteenth Corps seriously threatened Blakeley. Steele came up a few days afterward and joined that corps, and his troops then formed the extreme right in front of Blakely. Thatcher's squadron had moved up the bay parallel with the army, as far as the shallow water would allow, to assist in reducing the fort and cutting it off from communication with Mobile. Spanish Fort was garri
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
movement. Had Farragut then known how weakly Mobile was defended, he and Granger might easily haverepossession of Alabama, by a movement against Mobile, aided by other operations in the interior. Tder, under the direction of General Thomas. Mobile, at the beginning of 1865, was thoroughly fortter the fall of Vicksburg, when an attack upon Mobile was expected, General D. Leadbetter See pagines to Danley's Ferry. Meanwhile, a feint on Mobile was made to attract attention while the main b5. The movement had created much uneasiness in Mobile, for Moore's force was reported there to be frort and cutting it off from communication with Mobile. Spanish Fort was garrisoned by nearly three ow determined to carry it by The defenses of Mobile on the eastern shore. assault, and then push t. It is entitled, History of the Campaign of Mobile, including the co-operative Operations of Genen army, and the employment of the remainder at Mobile, made nearly the whole of Thomas's force in Te[40 more...]
Troy, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
el had not yet been resumed, to a great extent. The roads were in a rough condition, the cars were wretched in accommodations, and the passengers were few. The latter were chiefly Northern business men. We arrived at Augusta early in the morning, and after breakfast took seats in a very comfortable car for Atlanta. It was a warm, pleasant day, and the passengers were many. Among them the writer had the pleasure of discovering two highly-esteemed friends, Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Hart, of Troy, New York, who were then members of General Wool's family. traveling for the purpose of seeing the country; and he enjoyed their most agreeable companionship many days, until parting at New Orleans. We had just reached the beginning of the more picturesque hill-country of Georgia, which seemed to be peculiarly charming in the region of Crawfordsville, the home of Stephens, the Vice-President of the Confederacy, whose house we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed
Barrancas (Barinas, Venezuela) (search for this): chapter 19
d, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantry, and another of negro troops, under General Steele, at Barrancas. The West Gulf Squadron, commanded by Rear-Admiral Thatcher, was there, to co-operate. Mobile was so strongly fortified, that a direct attack upon it on the western side of the bay, was deemed too hazardous, and involved a protracted siege; it was therefore determined to flank the post by a movement of the main army up the eastern shore, and in concert with the navy, seize the fortifications on the islands and main land at the head of the bay, and then approach Mobile by way of Tensas
Cahawba river (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
1865. Wilson put his forces in rapid motion, with ample supplies, for Montevallo, beyond the Cahawba River. Arriving at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa red him to hold it at all hazards. Then Taylor left in a train of cars going south-ward toward Cahawba, and was no more seen. Forrest resolved to do his best, and did so. After a reconnoissance,66. t; was the site of the great Confederate iron-foundery there. hastened April 6, 1865. to Cahawba, the ancient capital of Alabama, This was the place where De Soto crossed the Alabama River,ward toward Wetumpka, on the Coosa, captured and destroyed five heavily laden Union Prison at Cahawba. sketched from a steamboat, in April, 1866. steamboats, which had fled up that stream for sf Ossian. We left Selma toward evening, and at sunset our vessel was moored a few minutes at Cahawba, to land a passenger whose name has been mentioned, as the entertainer of Wilson and Forrest.
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Mobile Point, and made its way slowly over a swampy region in heavy rains, consuming five or six days in the tedious and perilous journey. The Sixteenth Corps was already at the appointed rendezvous; having crossed the bay in transports from Fort Gaines to Danley's Ferry. Meanwhile, a feint on Mobile was made to attract attention while the main body was concentrating at Fish River. This was done by Moore's brigade of the Sixteenth Corps, which landed, with artillery, on Cedar Point, on the
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
geous to the Nationals in its actual performances. During that raid he captured five fortified cities, two hundred and eighty-eight pieces of artillery, twenty-three stand of colors, and six thousand eight hundred and twenty prisoners; and he destroyed a vast amount of property of every kind. He lost seven hundred and twenty-five men, of whom ninety-nine were killed. The writer visited the theater of events described in this chapter in the spring of 1866. He arrived at Savannah from Hilton Head See page 488. the first week in April, and after visiting places of historic interest there, left that city on an evening train April 5. for Augusta and farther west. Travel had not yet been resumed, to a great extent. The roads were in a rough condition, the cars were wretched in accommodations, and the passengers were few. The latter were chiefly Northern business men. We arrived at Augusta early in the morning, and after breakfast took seats in a very comfortable car for Atlanta.
Alabaha River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
he battle-fields around it until a second visit, See page 404. which he intended to make a few weeks later, and on the morning of the 8th, April, 1866. in chilling, cheerless air, we departed on a journey by railway, to Montgomery, on the Alabama River. We passed through the lines of heavy works in that direction, a great portion of the way to East Point, and from there onward, nearly every mile of the road was marked by the ravages of camping armies, or active and destructive raiders. Thotton belonging to his friends, and nothing was left where they lay, but the broken walls of the warehouses along the brow of the river bluff. From the cupola of that Capitol, we had a very extensive view of the country around, the winding Alabama River, and the city at our feet; and from the portico, where Jefferson Davis was inaugurated Provisional President of the Confederate States of America, we could look over nearly the whole. of the town. Montgomery must have been a very beautiful
Scottsboro (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
and prevent his joining Forrest, Wilson ordered McCook to move rapidly, with La Grange's brigade, to Centreville, cross the Cahawba there, and push on by way of Scottsville to assist Croxton in breaking up Jackson's column. McCook found Jackson at Scottsville, well posted, with intrenchments covering his column. Croxton had not cScottsville, well posted, with intrenchments covering his column. Croxton had not come up, and he could hear nothing of him. Feeling too weak to attack the Confederates, he skirmished with them a little, burned a factory at Scottsville, and then fell back. He destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigScottsville, and then fell back. He destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, six miles north of Plantersville, he was confronted by Forrest who had five thousand men behind a strong barricade and abatis. Forrest was straining every nerve to reach and defend Selma, which was one of the most important places in the Confederacy, on account of
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
these movements were in progress on the borders of the bay, General Steele, with Hawkins's division of negro troops, and Lucas's cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, ten miles north of Mobile, destroying, on the way, the railroad at Pollard, and inducing the belief that Canby's real objective was Montgomery, and s army, under General Cockerell. The two brigades numbered about three thousand men, commanded K by General St. John Lidell. Ever since Steele's arrival from Pensacola, his troops, and particularly Hawkins's negro division, had held Fort Blakely, as the works there were called, in a state of siege; and, for the first four days usiness three small vessels were destroyed by the explosion of torpedoes. On the 4th of May, Ebenezer Farrand, one of the traitors who placed the navy-yard near Pensacola in the hands of the Conspirators (see pages 168 and 169, volume I<*> in 1861, now in command of the few vessels belonging to the Confederates in the waters of Al
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