hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,281 total hits in 720 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
hot cut away all the shrouds of the port fore-rigging. A Whitworth shot cut away the fore-topmast rigging, and another the fore-gaff. A shot from the mound battery carried away the stock of the port-anchor. Many shot passed over the vessel and all around her, and the firing from the enemy's work was lively enough to make the affair very exciting. But the commander of the Mount Vernon did not abandon his prize; he towed her out, and delivered her to the Iroquois, which vessel took her to Beaufort. This cutting-out was gallantly done, and the parties concerned deserve great credit. Captain Case speaks handsomely of the manner in which Lieutenant Trathen boarded the Kate and towed her off shore. It was not only the coolness and bravery with which this affair was conducted, but also the professional skill with which the Mount Vernon was managed by her commander that gives it special merit. There were lively times when a blockade-runner was sighted. Starting a hare with a pack
Walkertown (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
e Army and Navy claimed to protect. The amenities of war were entirely forgotten on this occasion, and such wantonness could only insure retaliation on the first favorable opportunity. On the morning of June 4th, an expedition of 400 soldiers embarked at Yorktown on board the United States steamers Commodore Morris (Lieutenant-Commander Gillis), Commodore Jones (Lieutenant-Commander Mitchell), the army gun-boat Smith Briggs and the transport Winnissimmet. These vessels proceeded to Walkertown, about twenty miles above West Point, on the Mattapony River. Here the troops were landed and marched to Aylett's, where the object of the expedition was successfully accomplished: a large foundry, with all its machinery, grist mills, and a quantity of grain were destroyed, and a number of horses captured. The affair was carried through without any accident, the gun-boats keeping the river open, though several attempts were made by the enemy to annoy them at different points. This exp
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
portant captures. General Dix evacuates West Point, covered by gun-boats. expeditions up North, York, and Mattapony Rivers. cutting out of Confederate steamer Kate from under guns of Fort Fisher. self might fall. The Commodore Morris (the only available vessel) was sent immediately to the York River to co-operate with the Crusader, then there. Any one can imagine the embarrassment the commlabored under to satisfy all these demands, first in the Sounds, then on the Nansemond, James, or York rivers. After all, most of these gun-boats were merely improvised for the occasion, and the Armythoroughly. On May 31st, 1863, General Dix concluded to evacuate West Point, at the head of York River, and on that day the Federal Army marched out, covered by the gun-boats Commodore Morris, Commered. One of the mail-boats (the Swan) was fired upon by a party of Confederate raiders, on York River, below West Point, the result of which was the burning by the gun-boat Morse of twelve houses,
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
part of the State to the other with such rapidity and energetic action that the Confederates could make no headway against them. This course would have placed the Army in a more independent position, and they would not have become impressed with the idea that every soldier ought to carry a gun-boat in his pocket. On May 27th, Lieutenant Flusser reports an expedition under Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Charles A. French, who went in the steamer Whitehead to cruise in the eastern end of Albemarle Sound, and break up the contraband trade, a great deal of which was carried on in that vicinity. Lieutenant French reports the capture of a large two-masted boat, containing 500 barrels of tobacco. In Alligator River he captured or destroyed several boats engaged in illicit trade, and also along the shore a large quantity of pork, bacon, leather, tobacco bags, lard and tallow ready for shipment to the enemy. Many grist mills, grinding corn for the enemy, were burned by the officers of the
North River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
forage, provisions and ammunition, and landing them safely at Yorktown. In the latter part of May, Lieutenant-Commander James H. Gillis participated in an expedition with Brigadier-General Kilpatrick in Matthews County. The object of the expedition was to mount all the dismounted men in Kilpatrick's command. Lieutenant-Commander Gillis took on board the Commodore Morris 100 men from the 4th Delaware Volunteers, under Major La Mott, and with the Winnissimmet in company proceeded to North River, where he arrived at half-past 5 P. M. Here were captured 300 horses, 150 head of cattle and a large number of sheep. At the same time the troops destroyed all the property that could be of any use to the Confederates. A large amount of property was destroyed in these raids. It was impossible to discriminate, and, in consequence, a great many innocent people suffered. One of the mail-boats (the Swan) was fired upon by a party of Confederate raiders, on York River, below West Point
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
rilliant service, but it was a useful one. Without it the Confederates would have seriously harassed the important Army posts, and driven in the smaller ones. They dreaded those frail vessels, with their heavy guns and fearless seamen, and a gun-boat was often worth more to the Army than two or three stout regiments. The last act chronicled in the records of the North Atlantic squadron for this year is the destruction of the blockade-runner Venus. on October 21st. The Venus was from Nassau, bound to Wilmington, and, while attempting to run the blockade, was chased by the steamer Nansemond, Lieutenant Lamson, and overtaken. As the chase did not comply with his orders to heave-to, Lieutenant Lamson opened fire upon her. One shot struck her foremast, another exploded in her ward-room, a third passed through the funnel and killed one man, and a fourth, striking an iron plate near the water line, caused her to leak so badly that it was necessary to run her on shore, where (as it w
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
conduct of Navy. Lieutenant French's expedition. important captures. General Dix evacuates West Point, covered by gun-boats. expeditions up North, York, and Mattapony Rivers. cutting out of Confhe duty was performed very thoroughly. On May 31st, 1863, General Dix concluded to evacuate West Point, at the head of York River, and on that day the Federal Army marched out, covered by the gun-be mail-boats (the Swan) was fired upon by a party of Confederate raiders, on York River, below West Point, the result of which was the burning by the gun-boat Morse of twelve houses, in front or behinthe transport Winnissimmet. These vessels proceeded to Walkertown, about twenty miles above West Point, on the Mattapony River. Here the troops were landed and marched to Aylett's, where the objectary movements on the Peninsula, have constant accounts of the Federal's getting possession of West Point and then evacuating it, to fall back on Yorktown, which latter place seems to have been kept f
Alligator (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ld not have become impressed with the idea that every soldier ought to carry a gun-boat in his pocket. On May 27th, Lieutenant Flusser reports an expedition under Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Charles A. French, who went in the steamer Whitehead to cruise in the eastern end of Albemarle Sound, and break up the contraband trade, a great deal of which was carried on in that vicinity. Lieutenant French reports the capture of a large two-masted boat, containing 500 barrels of tobacco. In Alligator River he captured or destroyed several boats engaged in illicit trade, and also along the shore a large quantity of pork, bacon, leather, tobacco bags, lard and tallow ready for shipment to the enemy. Many grist mills, grinding corn for the enemy, were burned by the officers of the Valley City. At this time the Confederate commissaries were out in great force gathering stores for the Army near Suffolk, and it was desirable to destroy as much provisions as possible — even though the non-co
Little (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
roy all the means of subsisting an army in the State. Though it may have been said that the Federals held North Carolina, yet it was by a most precarious tenure; and this section, which should in the beginning have been completely conquered, remained simply a skirmishing-ground for the contending forces throughout the war. On January 5th the indefatigable Lieutenant Cushing started on an expedition to capture some Wilmington pilots, and having heard that there was a pilot station at Little River, thirty miles below Fort Caswell. he made sail for that point, and reached it on the morning of January 5th, 1863. He crossed the bar at 8 o'clock at night with twenty-five men, in three cutters, and proceeded up the river. He was in hopes of finding pilots above and also some schooners. About a mile from the mouth of the river the expedition received a volley of musketry from a bluff on the left. Cushing beached his boats the moment he was fired upon, without returning the fire, a
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
co-operate in expedition against Goldsborough, N. C. Lieutenant Cushing's expedition against Wilmington pilots. Cushing captures a Fort and puts enemy to flight. other adventures. Lieutenant Flus On January 5th the indefatigable Lieutenant Cushing started on an expedition to capture some Wilmington pilots, and having heard that there was a pilot station at Little River, thirty miles below Fo On the 31st of July, 1863, the steamer Kate, belonging to the Confederates, while going into Wilmington, was driven on Smith's Island Beach by the gun-boat Penobscot, but was eventually floated off ver the cost of all. On August 18th, one of these clippers, the Hebe, attempted to run into Wilmington by the New Inlet channel. There were several blockaders on the alert, and among them the Niphruction of the blockade-runner Venus. on October 21st. The Venus was from Nassau, bound to Wilmington, and, while attempting to run the blockade, was chased by the steamer Nansemond, Lieutenant La
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...