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Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ville, Missouri. It is one of the little towns on the Missouri River, and acquired some celebrity during the troubles in Kansas. It is built on rugged and very hilly ground, as almost all the towns on this unstable river are. It was founded by Conton was the peerless chief. In one number of the Luminary a paragraph appeared condemning the course of the invaders of Kansas. Enough! The press was destroyed and thrown into the river by a mob of pro-slavery ruffians. Col. Park also got noticst. I told him that Stringfellow and Atchison had said that had it not been for Mr. Thayer, and his Emigrant Aid scheme, Kansas ere this would have been a slave State. Then, sir, said the politician, sternly, if he comes to Virginia with such a r sale, at from $15 to $40 per acre. I asked him the reason why so many farms were for sale. Well, the emigration to Kansas and the South is one cause, and another reason is that a great many northerners who came down here, were too greedy to ma
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ed and thrown into the river by a mob of pro-slavery ruffians. Col. Park also got notice to leave, and was compelled to fly for his life. I went over to Parkville from Kansas city, Missouri, to attend to some business there. I had previously made the acquaintance of several of its ruffian citizens. I rode into the town about one o'clock. After stabling my horse, and getting dinner at the hotel, I walked leisurely through the town. I saw a crowd of about twenty men before the door of Col. Summers' office. The Colonel —— everybody in that region has a military title — is a justice of the peace, and has never, I believe, been engaged in any martial strife. I went over to the office. Hallo! Mr. R., said a voice from the crowd, here's an item for you.--Let's liquor. It was Mr. Stearns, the editor of the Southern Democrat, the pro-slavery successor of the Parkville Luminary. After the usual salutations, he informed me that an Englishman, named Joseph Atkinson, had been a<
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the river that night. Ii. A journey in Virginia. From Boston to Washington sail to Alexandria first impressions the county papers Choice extracts Me perorations and definitions of positions. I intended to stay for a time in Washington; but ran through it, like Christian out of Vanity Fair, praying to be deliverained heavily and incessantly all the forenoon. Alexandria is ten miles from Washington by water, but I saw very little of the scenery. What I did see was in strikir apparent loafers, is extraordinary. Talk with a slave. In coming from Washington, on the ferry-boat, I had a talk with one of the slaves. I asked him how muc1 50 a day; carpenters $2: printers get from $8 to $10, by the week. Over at Washington, they are employed by the piece, but work, they say, is precarious and fluctuunty. Slaves who are freed now, lie added, have to leave the State, or go to Washington and remain there a year to get their papers. His wife was there now. Her yea
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
--dead, as she aptly called it. One finger had been cut off by a doctor, and the auctioneer stated that she herself chopped off the other finger — her forefinger — because it hurt her, and she thought that to cut it off would cure it. This remark raised a laugh among the crowd. I looked at her, and expected to see a stupid-looking creature, low browed and sensual in appearance; but was surprised, instead, to see a woman with an eye which reminded me of Margaret Gardiner (whom I visited in Cincinnati), but more resolute, intelligent and impulsive. She was perfectly black; but her eye was Saxon, if by Saxon we mean a hell-defying courage, which neither death nor the devil can terrify. It was an eye that will never die in a slave's socket, or never die a natural death in so unworthy an abode. Did n't you cut your finger off, asked a man, kase you was mad? She looked at him quietly, but with a glance of contempt, and said: No, you see it was a sort oa sore, and I thought it wo
Parkville, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
My third trip. I. Missouri. Lynching an Abolitionist Parkville Col. Park the mob in Court the victim evidence Ruffiau Law Pleas different modes of punishment proposed the Lynchate one scene that I witnessed in the Far West: On the 18th of October, 1855, I was at Parkville, Missouri. It is one of the little towns on the Missouri River, and acquired some celebrity during Col. Park also got notice to leave, and was compelled to fly for his life. I went over to Parkville from Kansas city, Missouri, to attend to some business there. I had previously made the acqua looking man, about twenty-five years of age. He was a ropemaker by trade, and had worked near Parkville for five or six weeks past. It appears that he tried to induce a negro girl, the property oels at the door of the room. Tar enough was brought to have bedaubed the entire population of Parkville, including the women, the little children and the dogs; feathers enough to have given the pris
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
tate. But he did not escape. He owned the press and office of the Parkville Luminary, a paper which supported the party, or the wing of the party, of which Benton was the peerless chief. In one number of the Luminary a paragraph appeared condemning the course of the invaders of Kansas. Enough! The press was destroyed and thrown into the river by a mob of pro-slavery ruffians. Col. Park also got notice to leave, and was compelled to fly for his life. I went over to Parkville from Kansas city, Missouri, to attend to some business there. I had previously made the acquaintance of several of its ruffian citizens. I rode into the town about one o'clock. After stabling my horse, and getting dinner at the hotel, I walked leisurely through the town. I saw a crowd of about twenty men before the door of Col. Summers' office. The Colonel —— everybody in that region has a military title — is a justice of the peace, and has never, I believe, been engaged in any martial strife. I w<
Gainesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
unning into the mining districts. Sir, said a gentleman in conversation on this subject, if the road to heaven went by their front door, they could n't tell you the way there to save themselves from----! Negro-driving of horses. The country is less cultivated — along the turnpike, at least — wood is more plentiful, the fields far larger, and the scenery less beautiful, the nearer you approach to Fauquier county. The first place I came to was a hamlet of a dozen houses, called Gainesville, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, where I asked the price of land of a workman in a field close by. Another white man and a negro woman were working with him. He said, that in this part of the country, land ranged from eight to twenty-five dollars an acre, but advised me, if I wanted to buy, to go further back into the country. How many bushels of corn do you raise to an acre? Well, we don't average more than three barrels--nor that often. (Fifteen bushels.) Are there many northern<
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ound me expressed the opinion that she had done it willfully, to spite her master or mistress, or to keep her from being sold down South. I do not doubt it. A heroic act of this kind was once publicly performed, many years ago, in the city of St. Louis. It was witnessed by gentlemen still living there, one of whom — now an ardent Emancipationist — narrated the circumstance to me. These scenes occurred, not in Russia or Austria, or in avowedly despotic countries, but in the United States of America, which we are so fond of eulogizing as the chosen land of liberty! Liberty! Oh Liberty! what outrages are committed in thy name! These verses, penned in Richmond after a slave sale, by a personal friend of the present writer, although bitter, sectional, and fanatical, when viewed from a conservative position, more faithfully and graphically than any poetry that I have ever read, express the feelings of a man of compassionate and impulsive nature, when witnessing such wick
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
ee. After his death they ‘posed it. All the Virginians, every one of them, are in favor of setting me free. I am hired to this man for a hundred and twenty dollars a year. Would you like to be free? Yes, sir, I would that. I do not get any money — not a cent--‘cept what gentlemen I wait on chooses to give me. I have hardly time to change my clothes, let alone anything else. If I was free I would like to stay here if the law ‘lowed me, but it wo n't ‘low me. I would have to go to Canada, or some'eres else. I couldn't live in a slave State. My mother has no other child but me. She is rather browner than I am. I would respectfully transmit and submit to our prominent anti-slavery politicians, the interrogatory, heart-broken and vital, of the poor white slave: Oh, sirs, can't you invent some plan so that the slave need n't be in bondage all his life? When I see slavery as it is, and hear the poor bondmen talk, I feel my republicanism rapidly going out of me, and
Missouri (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
My third trip. I. Missouri. Lynching an Abolitionist Parkville Col. Park the mob in Court the victim evidence Ruffiau Law Pleas different modes of punishment proposed the Lynching done Riding on a rail, Lynching an Abolitionist. before proceeding on my third trip to the sea<*> board slave States, let me narrate one scene that I witnessed in the Far West: On the 18th of October, 1855, I was at Parkville, Missouri. It is one of the little towns on the Missouri River, and acquired some celebrity during the troubles in Kansas. It is built on rugged and very hilly ground, as almost all the towns on this unstable river are. It was founded by Colonel Park, a citizen of Illinois, twenty years, or more, before my visit to it. A mild, kind, hospitable, law-abiding man: one would naturally think that he — the founder of the town, the richest of its citizens, and a slaveholder, albeit, who had never once uttered an abolition sentiment — would not only have esca
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