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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ed down to the water. The crew of the Gen. Bragg and the Sumter escaped in like manner; while the swifter Gen. Van Dorn fled down the river. The battle had lasted a little over an hour, and its result was most decisive. No man was killed on board our fleet. Memphis, whose population had all been interested spectators of the combat, surrendered immediately. An expedition, comprising four gunboats and a steam transport, conveying the 46th Indiana, Col. Fitch, was soon dispatched up the Arkansas and White rivers, to open communication with Gen. Curtis, known to be approaching from the West. Reaching St. Charles, the Mound City, then in advance, was fired on from two concealed batteries, and replied, while our troops were landed below to take those batteries in the rear. A ball, from a siegegun on the bluff, pierced the side of the Mound City, and passed through her steam-drum, filling the vessel instantly with the scalding vapor. Of the 175 persons on board, barely 23 escaped in
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
lad. Leaving Cairo Feb. 2, 1862. with some 15,000 men on steam transports, he moved up the Ohio to the mouth of the Tennessee, then ascended that stream to within ten miles of Fort Henry, where his transports halted, Feb. 4-5. while Com. Footd not to fight for Nashville, but to continue his retreat; which he did, unassailed, to Corinth, Miss., south of the Tennessee river, and nearly 300 miles from Bowling Green. Six weeks were consumed in that retreat; which, with a green and undisciplwith intent to rush upon and overwhelm the Union army, so carelessly encamped just before him on the hither bank of the Tennessee. Having a spy in nearly every dwelling in southern Tennessee, he was doubtless aware that the command of that army hadee days afterward, against the soldiership which placed Grants's army on the south rather than on the north bank of the Tennessee. Where was your line of retreat? asked Buell. Oh, across the river, responded Grant. But you could not have ferried
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
n nearly every dwelling in southern Tennessee, he was doubtless aware that the command of that army had just been turned over by Gen. C. F. Smith, an experienced and capable soldier, to Gen. Grant, so recently from civil life; and he had no doubt of his ability to accomplish its destruction. Calling urgently upon the Governors of Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana, for all the troops they could spare or raise, and being strongly reenforced by Gen. Braxton Bragg, with a drilled corps from Mobile and Pensacola, About this time abandoned by the Rebels. he had, by the 1st of April, collected an army of about 50,000. Beauregard, in his field return of the Army of the Mississippi, before and after the battle of Shiloh, makes his effective total, before battle, 40,355 men, of whom 4,382 were cavalry, which he says was useless and could not operate at all, the battle-field being so thickly wooded. But this return includes none of his troops left to guard his base at Corinth, or his
Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
water. The crew of the Gen. Bragg and the Sumter escaped in like manner; while the swifter Gen. Van Dorn fled down the river. The battle had lasted a little over an hour, and its result was most decisive. No man was killed on board our fleet. Memphis, whose population had all been interested spectators of the combat, surrendered immediately. An expedition, comprising four gunboats and a steam transport, conveying the 46th Indiana, Col. Fitch, was soon dispatched up the Arkansas and White rivers, to open communication with Gen. Curtis, known to be approaching from the West. Reaching St. Charles, the Mound City, then in advance, was fired on from two concealed batteries, and replied, while our troops were landed below to take those batteries in the rear. A ball, from a siegegun on the bluff, pierced the side of the Mound City, and passed through her steam-drum, filling the vessel instantly with the scalding vapor. Of the 175 persons on board, barely 23 escaped injury. Many jum
Danville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
thward is Shiloh Church, and some ten miles farther is the road-crossing known as Monterey, where there were half-a-dozen houses. The region is thinly and recently settled; still mainly covered by the primitive forest; gently rolling, and traversed by a number of inconsiderable crecks, making eastward and northward, to be lost in the Tennessee. At Pittsburg Landing, the Tyler found a Rebel battery of six guns, which it silenced, after a mutual cannonade of two hours; returning thence to Danville and reporting. The movement of the army southward on transports was continued — the 46th Ohio, Col. Worthington, leading, on the transport B. J. Adams--so far as Savannah, where it was landed, March 10. and proceeded to take military possession. All the transports, 69 in number, conveying nearly 40,000 men, were soon debarking the army, with its material, at and near this place, whence Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was dispatched March 12. to Purdy, a station 16 miles W. S.W., where
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ged valleys of south-western Virginia, between the Alleghany and the Cumberland ranges of mountains, but drawing tribute also from western North Carolina and northern Georgia, traverses East Tennessee in a generally W. S. W. direction, entering Alabama at its N. E. corner; and, after a detour of some 300 miles, through the northerumber of its defenders had been swelled by successive reenforcements to about 15,000 The Richmond Dispatch has a letter from one of the officers, dated Augusta. Ga., Feb. 22, who says: Our troops number about 18,000. The Nashville Patriot, of about Feb. 19, gives a list of the regiments present, with the strength of each, whicma north of that river. Had he been even moderately reenforced, he would have struck and probably could have destroyed the great Rebel armories and founderies in Georgia, or have captured Chattanooga; which was assailed, June 6. under his orders, by Gen. Negley, who was driven off by a Rebel force under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. Mi
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
n swelled by successive reenforcements to about 15,000 The Richmond Dispatch has a letter from one of the officers, dated Augusta. Ga., Feb. 22, who says: Our troops number about 18,000. The Nashville Patriot, of about Feb. 19, gives a list of the regiments present, with the strength of each, which foots up 13,829, and is evidently incomplete. men. Most of them were Tennesseans, with about 2,000 Mississippians, 1,200 Virginians, 1,000 Kentuckians, and a thin regiment each from Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas. The fort was commanded by two or three points farther inland, within cannon-shot; the country rolling to the bluffs of the Tennessee: some of the hills midway having an elevation of about 300 feet. Deep ravines, with steep, rocky sides, especially near the bluffs of the Cumberland, separated these hills, and, with the tall, dense, primitive forests generally prevailing, afforded admirable positions for defensive warfare. A heavy and difficult abatis in good part surrounded the
Randolphs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
s, cut into and sunk, most of her crew going down with her. One of the Confederate gunboats had ere this been burnt; another had her boiler exploded by a shot; while the rest were so crippled as to render them nearly ineffective; so they gave up the fight and drifted down the river, under cover of the smoke, to the protection of their batteries. The Cincinnati was our only vessel that had suffered, and she had but 4 wounded. A month later, June 4. Fort Pillow was evacuated, as was Fort Randolph, twelve miles below. Some damaged guns were left in them, but nothing of much value. Com. Davis dropped down next day to within gun-shot of Memphis, where he came to anchor; and next morning, with five gunboats and four rams, slowly approached the city. Soon, a Rebel fleet of eight gunboats was seen approaching in order of battle, opening fire when within three-fourths of a mile. The Union ram, Queen of the West, soon struck the Rebel gunboat, Gen. Price, crushing in her wheel-honse
Russelville (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Ala., which he surprised at day-light, April 9. capturing 17 locomotives and a large number of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession of 100 miles of the Memphis and Charleston road before night, or from Stevenson on the east to Decatur on the west; seizing five more locomotives at Stevenson, and pushing on so far west as Tuseumbia, whence he sent an expedition so far south as Russelville, Ala., capturing and appropriating Confederate property on all hands, without the loss of a life. He took April 29. Bridgeport, Ala., with a force of five regiments, by striking rapidly and attacking from a quarter whence he was not looked for, driving out a force nearly equal in number to his own, with a loss of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inconsiderable. He was soon compelled, by the gathering of Rebel forces around him, to abandon Tuscumbi
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e Cumberland from the west, a little below the Tennessee village of Dover. A dirt road connected the two forts, whereof the garrisons were ehe country and seize the road leading from the fort to Donelson and Dover, while Gen. C. F. Smith, with his brigade, advanced along the west ng to poor teams and bad roads. Fort Donelson--two miles below Dover, where the Cumberland makes a short bend westward from its northerlr's response closed the correspondence thus: headquarters Dover (Tenn.), Feb. 16 1862. Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. Army: Sir: The n. Pillow, in his supplemental report, says: We sent up from Dover, 1,134 wounded. A Federal surgeon's certificate, which I have seen,he field or in the hospital at the fort, as he says: The village of Dover, which was within our lines, contained in every room in every houseified, during the 15th (Saturday), with a telegraphic dispatch from Dover, announcing a Rebel victory; somewhat tempered by reports from Bowl
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