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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington.

Found 49,042 total hits in 7,625 results.

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S. Cooper (search for this): chapter 1
eorganized as four-gun batteries. In some cases there were regimental organizations comprising 12 batteries, but most of the troops in this arm of the service were independent commands; even where there was a regimental organization, each battery acted separately and independently of the others. In the volunteer service the leading batteries, in point of loss in battle, were as follows: Killed and died of wounds. Light Artillery. Synonym.     Battery. Corps. Officers. Men. Total. Cooper's - B 1st Penn. Artillery First 2 19 21 Sands' -   11th Ohio Battery Seventeenth -- 20 20 Phillips' -   5th Mass. Battery Fifth 1 18 19 Weeden's - C 1st R. I. Artillery Fifth -- 19 19 Cowan's -   1st N. Y. Battery Sixth 2 16 18 Stevens' -   5th Maine Battery First 2 16 18 Ricketts' - F 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 17 18 Easton's - A 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Kern's - G 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Randolph's - E 1st R. I. <
he second highest in the list of infantry regiments having the greatest number killed in battle, is the Eighty-third Pennsylvania, which lost 282 officers and men who died while fighting for the Union. This was a Fifth Corps regiment, serving in Morell's — afterwards Griffin's--First Division. Two of its Colonels were killed, and a third was badly wounded and crippled for life. It was a splendid regiment, well officered and well drilled. It suffered a severe loss in killed, by percentage, as xth 1324 169 12.7 56th Massachusetts Stevenson's Ninth 1047 126 12.0 57th Massachusetts Stevenson's Ninth 1052 201 19.1 58th Massachusetts Potter's Ninth 1032 139 13.4 1st Michigan (S. S.) Willcox's Ninth 1101 137 12.4 1st Michigan Morell's Fifth 1329 187 14.0 2d Michigan Willcox's Ninth 1725 225 13.0 3d Michigan Birney's Third 1238 158 12.7 4th Michigan Griffin's Fifth 1325 189 14.2 5th Michigan Birney's Third 1883 263 13.9 7th Michigan Gibbon's Second 1315 208 15.
May, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1
and, also, in any regiment of the army — occurred in the First Maine Heavy Artillery, of Birney's Division, Second Corps. During its term of service it lost 23 officers and 400 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded in battle. This regiment is remarkable, also, for its large percentage of loss; for the large number of officers killed; and, for having sustained in a certain engagement the greatest loss of any regiment in any one battle. The First Maine H. A. did not take the field until May, 1864, having served the two previous years in the fortifications of Washington. Its fighting and all its losses occurred within a period of ten months. The next greatest loss in the heavy artillery is found in the Eighth New York, of Gibbon's Division, Second Corps, in which regiment 19 officers and 342 enlisted men were killed or died of wounds during their three years term of service. Like the First Maine, it did not go to the front nor see any fighting until the last year of its service
Henry Wilson (search for this): chapter 1
illed or fatally wounded in action, were the following: Regiment. Division. Corps. Officers. Men. Total. 1st Maine Gregg's Cavalry, A. P. 15 159 174 1st Michigan Kilpatrick's Cavalry, A. P. 14 150 164 5th Michigan Kilpatrick's Cavalry, A. P. 6 135 141 6th Michigan Kilpatrick's Cavalry, A. P. 7 128 135 1st Vermont Kilpatrick's Cavalry, A. P. 10 124 134 1st N. Y. Dragoons Torbert's Cavalry, A. P. 4 126 130 1st New Jersey Gregg's Cavalry, A. P. 12 116 128 2d New York Wilson's Cavalry, A. P. 9 112 121 11th Pennsylvania Kautz's Cavalry, A. P. 11 108 119 The light artillery was composed of batteries with a maximum strength of 150 men and six guns. Before the war closed many of them were reorganized as four-gun batteries. In some cases there were regimental organizations comprising 12 batteries, but most of the troops in this arm of the service were independent commands; even where there was a regimental organization, each battery acted separately and in
they receive official information to that effect. The official channels, through which such information must come, are the original records of the muster-out rolls; the final statements, as they are technically termed; and the affidavits which may accompany a pension claim. Now, the State of New Hampshire, and other States as well, have ascertained definitely that many of their missing men werekilled, and have revised their records accordingly; New Hampshire: Adjutant-General's Report, 1866: Vol. I. but, if these missing men have no heirs to prosecute their claims at the Pension Office, the records at Washington will remain unchanged and the men will still be recorded there, not among the killed, but as missing. The mortuary statistics in these pages are compiled largely from State records; hence, the figures in many cases will exceed those of the War Office. The variation, however, is not important enough to warrant this digression were it not for the honest endeavor to arri
June, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1
two missing. As this loss is included in the figures given for the Second Wisconsin, absolute accuracy would demand their subtraction before calculating the percentage. The regiment would, however, still remain at the head of the list in the table of percentages. In the case of the First Maine Heavy Artillery a careful discrimination was also necessary. The enrollment given here includes the original regiment, together with all recruits received prior to the close of the war. But, in June, 1865--two months after the war had closed — the regiment received a large accession from the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Maine Infantry. These latter commands had been mustered out, upon which the recruits with unexpired terms of service were transferred to the First Maine Heavy Artillery. These men — transferred after the war had ended — are not included in the enrollment, as they formed no part of the body under consideration in the matter of percentage of loss. Their number had already ent<
Doubleday (search for this): chapter 1
econd 1513 259 17.1 11th Penn. Reserves Crawford's Fifth 1179 196 16.6 142d Pennsylvania Doubleday's First 935 155 16.5 141st Pennsylvania Birney's Third 1037 167 16.1 19th Indiana Wadswos Fifth 1276 141 11.0 119th Pennsylvania Wright's Sixth 1216 141 11.5 121st Pennsylvania Doubleday's First 891 109 12.2 139th Pennsylvania Getty's Sixth 1070 145 13.5 140th Pennsylvania Bs Second 1132 198 17.4 141st Pennsylvania Birney's Third 1037 167 16.1 142d Pennsylvania Doubleday's First 935 155 16.5 143d Pennsylvania Doubleday's First 1491 151 10.1 145th PennsylvaniDoubleday's First 1491 151 10.1 145th Pennsylvania Barlow's Second 1456 205 14.1 148th Pennsylvania Barlow's Second 1339 210 15.6 149th Pennsylvania Doubleday's First 1454 169 11.6 184th Pennsylvania Gibbon's Second 959 113 11.7 188th PDoubleday's First 1454 169 11.6 184th Pennsylvania Gibbon's Second 959 113 11.7 188th Pennsylvania Brooks's Eighteenth 1201 124 10.3 2d Vermont Getty's Sixth 1811 224 12.3 3d Vermont Getty's Sixth 1748 206 11.7 5th Vermont Getty's Sixth 1533 213 13.8 6th Vermont Getty's Six
but most of the troops in this arm of the service were independent commands; even where there was a regimental organization, each battery acted separately and independently of the others. In the volunteer service the leading batteries, in point of loss in battle, were as follows: Killed and died of wounds. Light Artillery. Synonym.     Battery. Corps. Officers. Men. Total. Cooper's - B 1st Penn. Artillery First 2 19 21 Sands' -   11th Ohio Battery Seventeenth -- 20 20 Phillips' -   5th Mass. Battery Fifth 1 18 19 Weeden's - C 1st R. I. Artillery Fifth -- 19 19 Cowan's -   1st N. Y. Battery Sixth 2 16 18 Stevens' -   5th Maine Battery First 2 16 18 Ricketts' - F 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 17 18 Easton's - A 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Kern's - G 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Randolph's - E 1st R. I. Artillery Third -- 17 17 Pettit's - B 1st N. Y. Artillery Second -- 16 16 Bigelow's -   9th Mass.
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 1
10.0 61st New York Barlow's Second 1526 193 12.6 64th New York Barlow's Second 1313 173 13.1 69th New York Barlow's Second 1513 259 17.1 70th New York Hooker's Third 1226 190 15.4 72d New York Hooker's Third 1250 161 12.8 73d New York Hooker's Third 1326 156 11.7 76th New York Wadsworth's First 1491 173 11.6 Hooker's Third 1250 161 12.8 73d New York Hooker's Third 1326 156 11.7 76th New York Wadsworth's First 1491 173 11.6 82d New York Gibbon's Second 1452 181 12.4 83d New York Robinson's First 1413 156 11.0 84th New York Wadsworth's First 1365 162 11.8 86th New York Birney's Third 1524 172 11.2 88th New York Barlow's Second 1352 151 11.1 100th New York Terry's Tenth 1491 202 13.5 109th New York Willcox's Ninth 1353 165 12.1 1Hooker's Third 1326 156 11.7 76th New York Wadsworth's First 1491 173 11.6 82d New York Gibbon's Second 1452 181 12.4 83d New York Robinson's First 1413 156 11.0 84th New York Wadsworth's First 1365 162 11.8 86th New York Birney's Third 1524 172 11.2 88th New York Barlow's Second 1352 151 11.1 100th New York Terry's Tenth 1491 202 13.5 109th New York Willcox's Ninth 1353 165 12.1 111th New York Barlow's Second 1780 220 12.3 114th New York Dwight's Nineteenth 1134 121 10.6 115th New York Ames's Tenth 1196 135 11.2 121st New York Wright's Sixth 1426 226 15.8 124th New York Birney's Third 1320 148 11.2 126th New York Barlow's Second 1036 153 14.7 137th New York Geary's Twelfth 1111 127 11.4
ers. Men. Total. Cooper's - B 1st Penn. Artillery First 2 19 21 Sands' -   11th Ohio Battery Seventeenth -- 20 20 Phillips' -   5th Mass. Battery Fifth 1 18 19 Weeden's - C 1st R. I. Artillery Fifth -- 19 19 Cowan's -   1st N. Y. Battery Sixth 2 16 18 Stevens' -   5th Maine Battery First 2 16 18 Ricketts' - F 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 17 18 Easton's - A 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Kern's - G 1st Penn. Artillery First 1 16 17 Randolph's - E 1st R. I. Artillery Third -- 17 17 Pettit's - B 1st N. Y. Artillery Second -- 16 16 Bigelow's -   9th Mass. Battery Reserve Art'y 2 13 15 Bradbury's -   1st Maine Battery Nineteenth 2 13 15 Wood's - A 1st Ill. Artillery Fifteenth -- 15 15 The loss in the Eleventh Ohio Battery occurred almost entirely in one action, 19 of its men having been killed or mortally wounded at Iuka in a charge on the battery. In the other batteries, however, the losses repre<
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