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Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
's division in boats. Leaving my command there, I steamed down to Savannah, and reported to General Smith in person, who saw in the flooded T remained on the north side of Snake Creek, on a road leading from Savannah or Crump's Landing to Purdy. General C. F. Smith remained back at Savannah, in chief command, and I was only responsible for my own division. I kept pickets well out on the roads, and made myself familiarly his conduct after Donelson; and he too made his headquarters at Savannah, but frequently visited our camps. I always acted on the suppositto our lines, and reported the fact by letter to General Grant, at Savannah; but thus far we had not positively detected the presence of infank on board the Fanny Bullitt, I have permitted her to take them to Savannah. There is neither house nor building of any kind that can be useds well over on the left. lie also told me that on his way up from Savannah that morning he had stopped at Crump's Landing, and had ordered Le
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
ers sent with expeditions from the river. General C. F. Smith or some very discreet officer should be selected for such commands. Having accomplished these objects, or such of them as may be practicable, you will return to Danville, and move on Paris. Perhaps the troops sent to Jackson and Humboldt can reach Paris by land as easily as to return to the transports. This must depend on the character of the roads and the position of the enemy. All telegraphic lines which can be reached must Paris by land as easily as to return to the transports. This must depend on the character of the roads and the position of the enemy. All telegraphic lines which can be reached must be cut. The gunboats will accompany the transports for their protection. Any loyal Tennesseeans who desire it, may be enlisted and supplied with arms. Competent officers should be left to command Forts Henry and Donelson in your absence. I have indicated in general terms the object of this. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Again on the 2d: Cairo, March 2, 1862. To General Grant: General Halleck, February 25th, telegraphs me: General Grant will send no more forces to Clarksville.
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
onducted division, I led the head of my column to General McClernand's right, formed line of battle, facing south, with Buckland's brigade directly across the ridge, and Stuart's brigade on its right in the woods; and thus advanced, steadily and slowly, under a heavy fire of musketry and artillery. Taylor had just got to me from the rear, where he had gone for ammunition, and brought up three guns, which I ordered into position, to advance by hand firing. These guns belonged to Company A, Chicago Light Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant P. P. Wood, and did most excellent service. Under cover of their fire, we advanced till we reached the point where the Corinth road crosses the line of McClernand's camp, and here I saw for the first time the well-ordered and compact columns of General Buell's Kentucky forces, whose soldierly movements at once gave confidence to our newer and less disciplined men. Here I saw Willich's regiment advance upon a point of water-oaks and thicket, behind w
West Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
th Ohio; embarked on the Empress, Baltic, Shenango, and Marengo. We steamed up to Fort Henry, the river being high and in splendid order. There I reported in person to General C. F. Smith, and by him was ordered a few miles above, to the remains of the burned railroad bridge, to await the rendezvous of the rest of his army. I had my headquarters on the Continental. Among my colonels I had a strange character Thomas Worthington, colonel of the Forty-sixth Ohio. He was a graduate of West Point, of the class of 1827; was, therefore, older than General Halleck, General Grant, or myself, and claimed to know more of war than all of us put together. In ascending the river he did not keep his place in the column, but pushed on and reached Savannah a day before the rest of my division. When I reached that place, I found that Worthington had landed his regiment, and was flying about giving orders, as though he were commander-in-chief. I made him get back to his boat, and gave him to
Tuscumbia (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
arrived about the 13th of March, with a large fleet of boats, containing Hurlbut's division, Lew. Wallae's division, and that of himself, then commanded by Brigadier-General W. H. L. Wallace. General Smith sent for me to meet him on his boat, and ordered me to push on under escort of the two gunboats, Lexington and Tyler, commanded by Captains Gwin and Shirk, United States Navy. I was to land at some point below Eastport, and make a break of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, between Tuscumbia and Corinth. General Smith was quite unwell, and was suffering from his leg, which was swollen and very sore, from a mere abrasion in stepping into a small-boat. This actually mortified, and resulted in his death about a month after, viz., April 25, 1862. He was adjutant of the Military Academy during the early part of my career there, and afterward commandant of cadets. He was a very handsome and soldierly man, of great experience, and at Donelson had acted with so much personal brave
Monterey (California, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
ision, and that of General Hurlbut, at Pittsburg Landing; to take positions well back, and to leave room for his whole army; telling me that he would soon come up in person, and move out in force to make the lodgment on the railroad, contemplated by General Halleck's orders. Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson, of General C. F. Smith's, or rather General Halleck's, staff, returned with me, and on tile 16th of March we disembarked and marched out about ten miles toward Corinth, to a place called Monterey or Pea Ridge, where the rebels had a cavalry regiment, which of course decamped on our approach, but from the people we learned that trains were bringing large masses of men from every direction into Corinth. McPherson and I reconnoitred the ground well, and then returned to our boats. On the 18th, Hurlbut disembarked his division and took post about a mile and a half out, near where the roads branched, one leading to Corinth and the other toward Hamburg. On the 19th I disembarked my div
Marengo (Illinois, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
Illinois, Seventy-first Ohio, and Fifty-fourth Ohio; embarked on the Hannibal, Universe, Hazel Dell, Cheeseman, and Prairie Rose. The Third Brigade, Colonel Hildebrand, was composed of the Seventy-seventh Ohio, Fifty-seventh Ohio, and Fifty-third Ohio; embarked on the Poland, Anglo-Saxon, Ohio No. Three, and Continental. The Fourth Brigade, Colonel Buckland, was composed of the Seventy-second Ohio, Forty-eighth Ohio, and Seventieth Ohio; embarked on the Empress, Baltic, Shenango, and Marengo. We steamed up to Fort Henry, the river being high and in splendid order. There I reported in person to General C. F. Smith, and by him was ordered a few miles above, to the remains of the burned railroad bridge, to await the rendezvous of the rest of his army. I had my headquarters on the Continental. Among my colonels I had a strange character Thomas Worthington, colonel of the Forty-sixth Ohio. He was a graduate of West Point, of the class of 1827; was, therefore, older than Gen
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
s. These were, the Army of the Ohio, Major-General Buell, in Kentucky; the Army of the Tennessee, Major-General Grant, at Forts Henry and Donelson; and General S. R. Curtis, in Southern Missouri. He posted his chief of staff, General Cullum, at Cairo, and me at Paducah, chiefly to expedite and facilitate tile important operations then in progress up the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. Fort Donelson surrendered to General Grant on the 16th of February, and there must have been a good deal e it, may be enlisted and supplied with arms. Competent officers should be left to command Forts Henry and Donelson in your absence. I have indicated in general terms the object of this. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Again on the 2d: Cairo, March 2, 1862. To General Grant: General Halleck, February 25th, telegraphs me: General Grant will send no more forces to Clarksville. General Smith's division will come to Fort Henry, or a point higher up on the Tennessee River; transports
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
important operations then in progress up the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. Fort Donelson surrn as possible, to move your column up the Tennessee River. The main object of this expedition wills purpose was evidently to operate up the Tennessee River, to break up Bear Creek Bridge and the raommunications between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, and no doubt lie was provoked that Generhe assault. I immediately steamed up the Tennessee River, following the two gunboats, and, in passd to the command of all the troops up the Tennessee River, by reason of General Smith's extreme illhe landing is the best I have seen on the Tennessee River. The levee is clear of trees or snags,ine of camps was almost parallel with the Tennessee River, and about two miles back from it. Very sGeneral Buell had reached the bank of the Tennessee River opposite Pittsburg Landing, and was in thneral Buell's army was on our side of the Tennessee River that evening, and their loss was trivial.[2 more...]
Yellow River, Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
ip up the river, he had found a rebel regiment of cavalry posted there, and that it was the usual landing-place for the people about Corinth, distant thirty miles. I sent word back to General Smith that, if we were detained up the river, he ought to post some troops at Pittsburg Landing. We went on up the river cautiously, till we saw Eastport and Chickasaw, both of which were occupied by rebel batteries and a small rebel force of infantry. We then dropped back quietly to the mouth of Yellow River, a few miles below, whence led a road to Burnsville, a place on the Memphis & Charleston road, where were the company's repair-shops. We at once commenced disembarking the command: first the cavalry, which started at once for Burnsville, with orders to tear up the railroad-track, and burn the depots, shops, etc; and I followed with the infantry and artillery as fast as they were disembarked. It was raining very hard at the time. Daylight found us about six miles out, where we met the c
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