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divisions of the Army of the Tennessee, if A. J. Smith gets here, in which case he will have full thirty thousand of the best men in America. He will cross the Tennessee at Decatur and Whitesburg, march toward Rome, and feel for Thomas. If Johnston falls behind the Coosa, then McPherson will push for Rome; and if Johnston falls behind the Chattahoochee, as I believe he will, then McPherson will cross over and join Thomas. McPherson has no cavalry, but I have taken one of Thomas's divisionsJohnston falls behind the Chattahoochee, as I believe he will, then McPherson will cross over and join Thomas. McPherson has no cavalry, but I have taken one of Thomas's divisions, viz., Garrard's, six thousand strong, which is now at Columbia, mounting, equipping, and preparing. I design this division to operate on McPherson's right, rear, or front, according as the enemy appears. But the moment I detect Johnston falling behind the Chattahoochee, I propose to cast off the effective part of this cavalry division, after crossing the Coosa, straight for Opelika, West Point, Columbus, or Wetumpka, to break up the road between Montgomery and Georgia. If Garrard can do thi
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
hio, were at Chattanooga, Huntsville, and Knoxville, and the tables on page 16, et seq., give their exact condition and strength. The Department of the Arkansas was then subject to my commnand, but General Fred Steele, its commander, was at Little Rock, remote from me, acting in cooperation with General Banks, and had full employment for every soldier of his command; so that I never depended on him for any men, or for any participation in the Georgia campaign. Soon after, viz., May 8th, thahy he had declined battle, and did not learn the real reason till after the war was over, and then from General Johnston himself. In the autumn of 1865, when in command of the Military Division of the Missouri, I went from St. Louis to Little Rock, Arkansas, and afterward to Memphis. Taking a steamer for Cairo, I found as fellow-passengers Generals Johnston and Frank Blair. We were, of course, on the most friendly terms, and on our way up we talked over our battles again, played cards, and
Alabaha River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
ll such time as he can reach me. Should Johnston fall behind the Chattahoochee, I will feign to the right, but pass to the left and act against Atlanta or its eastern communications, according to developed facts. This is about as far ahead as I feel disposed to look, but I will ever bear in mind that Johnston is at all times to be kept so busy that he cannot in any event send any part of his command against you or Banks. If Banks can at the same time carry Mobile and open up the Alabama River, he will in a measure solve the most difficult part of my problem, viz., provisions. But in that I must venture. Georgia has a million of inhabitants. If they can live, we should not starve. If the enemy interrupt our communications, I will be absolved from all obligations to subsist on our own resources, and will feel perfectly justified in taking whatever and wherever we can find. I will inspire my command, if successful, with the feeling that beef and salt are all that is absol
Catoosa Springs (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
removed my headquarters to Chattanooga, and prepared for taking the field in person. General Grant had first indicated the 30th of April as the day for the simultaneous advance, but subsequently changed the day to May 5th. McPherson's troops were brought forward rapidly to Chattanooga, partly by rail and partly by marching. Thomas's troops were already in position (his advance being out as far as Ringgold--eighteen miles), and Schofield was marching down by Cleveland to Red Clay and Catoosa Springs. On the 4th of May, Thomas was in person at Ringgold, his left at Catoosa, and his right at Leet's Tan-yard. Schofield was at Red Clay, closing upon Thomas's left; and McPherson was moving rapidly into Chattanooga, and out toward Gordon's Mill. On the 5th I rode out to Ringgold, and on the very day appointed by General Grant from his headquarters in Virginia the great campaign was begun. To give all the minute details will involve more than is contemplated, and I will endeavor onl
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
o with General George H. Thomas, and then continued on to Knoxville, where was General Schofield. He returned with us to Cha his corps since I had left him with General Burnside, at Knoxville, the preceding November; and he stated to me personally ten returned to Nashville; General Schofield going back to Knoxville, and McPherson to Huntsville, Thomas remaining at Chattanrevious desolation of the country between Chattanooga and Knoxville, General Thomas had authorized the issue of provisions toTennessee, and Ohio, were at Chattanooga, Huntsville, and Knoxville, and the tables on page 16, et seq., give their exact con1379831,4061,489911851202211,764969114435229 Defenses of Knoxville242  1231233,5073,6301935445524164,579313143787544441 New8548971624592915  Brig.-General T. T. Garrard.Defenses of Knoxville3991985,4155,6135,61321455  571,83412 602Brigadier-General be given by you, Schofield, leaving a select garrison at Knoxville and Loudon, with twelve thousand men will drop down to th
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
of my personal staff and the records of the department during the time we had been absent at Meridian; and there I found General McPherson, who had arrived from Vicksburg, and had assumed command of the Army of the Tennessee. General McPherson accompanied me, and we proceeded by the cars to Stevenson, Bridgeport, etc., to Chattanoere of my command. I accordingly instructed one of my inspector-generals, John M. Corse, to take a fleet steamboat at Nashville, proceed via Cairo, Memphis, and Vicksburg, to General Banks up the Red River, and to deliver the following letter of April 3d, as also others, of like tenor, to Generals A. J. Smith and Fred Steele, who to cooperate with you and the navy, but, as I before stated, I must have A. J. Smith's troops now as soon as possible. I beg you will expedite their return to Vicksburg, if they have not already started, and I want them if possible to remain in the same boats they have used up Red River, as it will save the time otherwise consum
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
  Aggregate13,559 Guns, 28.  Grand aggregate, 98,797 men and 254 guns.  These figures do not embrace the cavalry divisions which were still incomplete, viz., of General Stoneman, at Lexington, Kentucky, and of General Garrard, at Columbia, Tennessee, who were then rapidly collecting horses, and joined us in the early stage of the campaign. General Stoneman, having a division of about four thousand men and horses, was attached to Schofield's Army of the Ohio. General Garrard's divisio and if Johnston falls behind the Chattahoochee, as I believe he will, then McPherson will cross over and join Thomas. McPherson has no cavalry, but I have taken one of Thomas's divisions, viz., Garrard's, six thousand strong, which is now at Columbia, mounting, equipping, and preparing. I design this division to operate on McPherson's right, rear, or front, according as the enemy appears. But the moment I detect Johnston falling behind the Chattahoochee, I propose to cast off the effective
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
our chief depot, was itself partially in a hostile country, and even the routes of supply from Louisville to Nashville by rail, and by way of the Cumberland River, had to be guarded. Chattanooga (our I then instructed and authorized him to hold on to all trains that arrived at Nashville from Louisville, and to allow none to go back until he had secured enough to fill the requirements of our probing that he would not be able with diminished stock to bring forward the necessary stores from Louisville to Nashville. I wrote to him, frankly telling him exactly how we were placed, appealed to hisming into Jeffersonville, Indiana. He and General Robert Allen, then quartermaster-general at Louisville, arranged a ferry-boat so as to transfer the trains over the Ohio River from Jeffersonville, aess which afterward attended our campaigns; and I have always felt grateful to Mr. Guthrie, of Louisville, who had sense enough and patriotism enough to subordinate the interests of his railroad compa
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
st the railroad to Johnston's rear, at or near Resaca, distant from Dalton only eighteen miles, and ile and a half of the railroad, above and near Resaca), and we all felt jubilant. I renewed orders ced his whole force astride the railroad above Resaca, and there have easily withstood the attack ofe army through Snake-Creek Gap, and to move on Resaca with the main army. But during the 10th, thed defenses at Dalton, and was found inside of Resaca with the bulk of his army, holding his division, a station on the railroad seven miles below Resaca. At the same time, May 14th, I dispatched Gento give up such strong positions as Dalton and Resaca, for the purpose of drawing us farther south, n. We hastily repaired the railroad-bridge at Resaca, which had been partially burned, and built a s, previously laid. Inasmuch as the bridge at Resaca was overtaxed, Hooker's Twentieth Corps was also industrious and skillful that the bridge at Resaca was rebuilt in three days, and cars loaded wit[12 more...]
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
Twentieth Corps was also diverted to cross by the fords and ferries above Resaca, in the neighborhood of Echota. On the 17th, toward evening, the head of Thomas's column, Newton's division, encountered the rear-guard of Johnston's army near Adairsville. I was near the head of column at the time, trying to get a view of the position of the enemy from an elevation in an open field. My party attracted the fire of a battery; a shell passed through the group of staff-officers and burst just beyxcept at the bridge at Resaca, and then to go on. Nearly all the people of the country seemed to have fled with Johnston's army; yet some few families remained, and from one of them I procured the copy of an order which Johnston had made at Adairsville, in which he recited that he had retreated as far as strategy required, and that his army must be prepared for battle at Cassville. The newspapers of the South, many of which we found, were also loud in denunciation of Johnston's falling back
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