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Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
nition having been procured by my order from Nashville, I felt myself prepared to test the effect od and wounded. The latter were carried to Nashville as rapidly as steamboats from Dover could coiment, (since reported dead;) Capt. Many, of Nashville; Capt. Crigier, Fourteenth Mississippi; CaptFederal lines. It was the general belief at Nashville, that fully five thousand of Gen. Floyd's di any force brought against it. The armory at Nashville has been moved to Atlanta, together with muc Certain it is that, up to Wednesday night, Nashville had not fallen into the hands of the enemy, and at twelve o'clock Pillow telegraphed to Nashville: The day is ours; we have repulsed the enemye alluded to, and from thence by steamers to Nashville. The care bestowed upon them was excellent,rolling stock of the railroads converging in Nashville was brought into requisition, and the machinpt at a description of affairs in and around Nashville. It is necessarily meagre, because one pair[12 more...]
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
he battery, S. B. Buckner, Brigadier-General. General Grant's reply. Headquarters army in the field, camp near Donelson, Feb. 16. To Gen. S. B. Buckner Confederate Army: Yours of this date, proposing an armistice and appointment of Commiavy bombardment following the succeeding day. The night of Thursday will long be remembered by the troops surrounding Donelson. The weather, which for the two previous days had been so mild and genial, toward the close of the afternoon became chi so disastrous. Saturday, which was destined to witness the grand denouement of the tragedies which had a scene about Donelson, was cold, damp, and cheerless. Our troops, however, had but little time to cogitate upon the weather, or any other sube opinion prevalent in the army of the West is, that if the troops retired from Bowling Green could have concentrated at Donelson, or a reenforcement of ten thousand fresh men been added to the exhausted army at noon on Saturday, despite the fact tha
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
7, 1862. General A. S. Johnston: sir: Your order of the twelfth of this month, transmitted to me by telegraph from Bowling Green to Cumberland City, reached me the same evening. It directed me to repair at once, with what force I could command, ation, with reference to his regiment. Previous to the month of February, the Mississippians had been stationed at Bowling Green. Affairs at Forts Henry and Donelson, however, being in a precarious condition, and the certainty of a Federal advanat execution in several charges. The opinion prevalent in the army of the West is, that if the troops retired from Bowling Green could have concentrated at Donelson, or a reenforcement of ten thousand fresh men been added to the exhausted army at the army would fall back and endeavor to retrieve their losses from another point. On Sunday, the army evacuating Bowling Green passed through Nashville, en route for Murfreesboro, or some other locality in that vicinity — a heterogeneous mixtur
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
ntry, Eighth regiment of Kentucky infantry, and a battalion of Forest cavalry, (Texas.) The hill was covered at intervals with forest and dense underbrush. I deployrmy of eighteen thousand, composed of the men of Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama, confronted by an army of at least fifty thousand of tng is the fullest list I can yet make out: killed. Lieut.-Col Clough, of Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, of Clarksville Capt. May, of Memphis; Capt. Porter of Nashvist of the regiments were from Tennessee and Mississippi, but Virginia, Alabama, Texas, and Arkansas also contributed their quota, and swelled the dimensions of the al sources I have made the following brief list: Killed.--Lieut.-Col. Clough, Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, Clarksville, Tenn.; Capt. May, Memphis; Capt. Porter, Nashvi,------65024 2dKyDanson,------6181357 8thdo.Burnett,Lt.-Col. Lyon,3001960 7thTexas.Gregg,------3002030 15thArk.Gee,------270717 27thAla.Hughes,------21601 1stM
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
's horse was severely wounded at this place. About this time Col. Logan, of Illinois, rode up and informed me that his regiment had entered between me and the enemry in skirmishing with the enemy. Corporal Armstrong, of company H, Eleventh. Illinois, when the color-sergeant of the regiment was shot down, and the colors fell, rosts, it was certain death for a man to show his head. A picked regiment from Illinois, nine hundred strong, acting as skirmishers and sharpshooters, fired with deadould tear everything loose. During the day a desperate charge was made by two Illinois regiments upon the Second Kentucky and the Tenth Tennessee, but with equal dest the enemy fought nobly. Those who were taken prisoners were from Minnesota, Illinois, Ohio and Indiana. As in other engagements during the war, it was found. ne along our entire lines. During the fight a desperate charge was made by two Illinois regiments upon the Second Kentucky and Tenth Tennessee, but they were met almo
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
port. U. S. Flag-ship St. Louis, near Fort Donelson, via Paducah, February 15, 1862. To the Horeport of the action of my division before Fort Donelson has been delayed from various causes. I sigade, Second division United States army, Fort Donelson, February 18, 1862. General: I have the headquarters Fifty-Eighth Reg. O. V. I., Fort Donelson, February 18. C. P. Buckingham, Adjutant- MeClellan: The Union flags floats over Fort Donelson. The Carondelet, Capt. Walke, brings the order no. 145.headquarters First division, Fort Donelson, February 18, 1862. Officers and Men oferations of the forces under my command at Fort Donelson, it is proper to state the condition of thrt which is thought to be a black one. Fort Donelson, Tenn., Monday, Feb. 17, 1862. My last lettup the river and opened a vigorous fire on Fort Donelson; but after a severe exchanging of shots foy afternoon instead of our jaded soldiers, Fort Donelson would not have fallen; but the lack of thi[59 more...]
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
ervices here, until we can repair damages by bringing up a competent force from Cairo to attack the Fort, are much less required than they are at Cairo — I shall proCairo — I shall proceed to that place. I have sent the Tyler to the Tennessee River to render the railroad bridge impassable. A. H. Foote, Flag-Officer Commanding Naval Force Western Division. Official despatch from Commodore Foote. Cairo, ill., February 17. To Hon. G. Welles, Secretary of the Navy: The Carondelet has just arrived l. Fifty-eighth Regiment, O. V. Infantry. Report of Brig.-Gen. Cullum. Cairo, February 17, 1862. To Major-General MeClellan: The Union flags floats over that one of the injured boats was sunk, and that others had to be towed back to Cairo. This information may or may not be true, but it is certain that all of the bon ones — Tyler, Lexington, and Conestoga. There is a boat about to leave for Cairo, and I have concluded to mail this without awaiting the result of the final ass<
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
erms had not, at the latest advices, been submitted to the Union commander. Gen. Johnston informed the citizens that he should be compelled to evacuate the place on account of his inability to defend it with the force at his command, and Gen. Pillow subsequently made a speech to the public, in which he informed them that the army would fall back and endeavor to retrieve their losses from another point. On Sunday, the army evacuating Bowling Green passed through Nashville, en route for Murfreesboro, or some other locality in that vicinity — a heterogeneous mixture of artillery, cavalry, infantry, ambulances, wagons, and negroes, all worn down with their long forced march of eighty miles. The city is said to have been very unsound, and McClernand himself confessed that he was in daily receipt of information concerning the movements of our troops. Phosphorous and other inflammable compounds have since been found concealed ready for use, and it is also stated that a batch of Union
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
d who were also compelled by the steady, unflinching valor of our men, to give way. In the mean time there were indications that the enemy were gaining some advantage on the right of the whole line. Reenforcements, consisting of Kentucky and Indiana troops, had been sent forward past my position to support the right, but notwithstanding this, it became evident to me from the sounds coming from the direction of the enemy's shot, which began to rake my line from the rear of my right, that the and acted as a Brigadier-General in another part of the field, his place being supplied by Major Doss, of the Choctaw Agency. Lieut. D. says that the enemy fought nobly. Those who were taken prisoners were from Minnesota, Illinois, Ohio and Indiana. As in other engagements during the war, it was found. necessary to adopt some mark by which friend could be recognised from foe, and that adopted was a white band o.n the arm. The flag carried for the same purpose, had a blue ground with a
ve admonished us to be more wary and circumspect, to husband with greater care our limited resources, and not to underrate our enemy. But they have also placed between them and us a gulf that can never be crossed by their arts and arms, and a universal determination to die, if die we must, for our country, but never permit her to be subjugated by the most malignant, the most murderous, the meanest of mankind, whose name is at this very moment such, a by-word of scorn and reproach throughout Europe, for their combined cruelty and cowardice, that their own ambassadors cannot stand the storm of the world's contempt, and are all anxious to fly back to the United States. Their success at Fort Donelson, gained only by vast superiority of numbers, will only have the effect of converting the whole population of the South--men, women, and children — into an immense army, who will resist them at every step, and everywhere welcome them with bloody hands to hospitable graves. The glorious valor
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