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Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 74
Doc. 72.-fight at Pittsburgh, Tenn. Commodore Foote's report. Cairo, March 3, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles: Lieut. Commanding Shirk has this moment arrived from the Tennessee River, and brings full despatches from Lieut. Commanding Gwin, of the gunboat Tyler, a synopsis of which is, that the two gunboats proceeded up to Pittsburgh, near the Mississippi line, where a rebel battery was opened upon them, consisting of six guns, one of them being rifled, which were soon silenced by the guur most obedient servant, James W. Shirk, Lieutenant Commanding. To Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, Commanding U. S. Naval Forces, Cairo, Ill. Chicago post narrative. Cairo, Monday, March 3. The discovery of a new rebel battery on the Tennessee River, mentioned by telegraph, was made in this wise. Hearing that the rebels were planting a new battery somewhere near Savannah, the wooden gunboats Tyler and Lexington were ordered to make a reconnaissance up the river and shell them out. The
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
t servant, James W. Shirk, Lieutenant Commanding. To Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, Commanding U. S. Naval Forces, Cairo, Ill. Chicago post narrative. Cairo, Monday, March 3. The discovery of a new rebel battery on the Tennessee River, mentioned by telegraph, was made in this wise. Hearing that the rebels were planting a new battery somewhere near Savannah, the wooden gunboats Tyler and Lexington were ordered to make a reconnaissance up the river and shell them out. The boats left Fort Henry Friday morning, and proceeded slowly, examining the shores carefully as they went along. They were accompanied by the transport Izetta, with two companies of the Thirty-second Illinois regiment. They passed Savannah about ten o'clock Saturday morning, having as yet discovered no signs of the expected battery. But now the transport was ordered to keep well in the river, as at any moment a shell or round shot might announce the unpleasant proximity of the object they were in quest of.
Harding (South Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 74
the gunboats, and charged upon the enemy, driving them some distance, until they were strongly reenforced, when our party withdrew to the boats. Then three rebel regiments opened upon the gunboats, but were repulsed with great slaughter. The casualties on our side amounted to five killed and missing and five wounded. Lieutenants Commanding Gwin and Shirk, with their commands, have behaved with great gallantry and judgment. An election for town-officers has just taken place in Harding County, Tenn., which resulted in two hundred votes for the Union and thirteen for secession. A. H. Foote, Flag-Officer. Lieut. Commanding Gwin's report. United States gunboat Tyler, Savannah, Tenn., March 1, 1862. sir: Having learned that the rebels had occupied and were fortifying a place called Pittsburgh, nine miles above, on the right bank of the river, (the best point in the river for that purpose,) I determined to attack them. At twelve M. the Tyler, followed by the Lexington
John C. Rider (search for this): chapter 74
batteries. We then proceeded abreast of the place, and, under the cover of grape and canister, landed two armed boats from each vessel, containing, besides their crews, a portion of company C, Capt. Thaddeus Phillips, and company K, First Lieut. John C. Rider, of the Thirty-second regiment, Illinois volunteers, (sharpshooters,) Second Master Jason Goudy, commanding the boats of the Tyler, and Second Master Martin Dunn, commanding the boats of the Lexington. The landing was successfully accovered from their breastworks that they were preparing to fortify strongly this point. Too much praise cannot be given to Lieut. Commanding Shirk for the efficient manner in which his vessel was handled. My thanks are due to Capt. Phillips, Lieut. Rider, and their men, for the gallant manner in which, in the face of the enemy, they charged up the hill, drove back and held in check the rebels, until the boats' crews had effected the destruction of the house designated. The officers and men of
Jason Goudy (search for this): chapter 74
, landed two armed boats from each vessel, containing, besides their crews, a portion of company C, Capt. Thaddeus Phillips, and company K, First Lieut. John C. Rider, of the Thirty-second regiment, Illinois volunteers, (sharpshooters,) Second Master Jason Goudy, commanding the boats of the Tyler, and Second Master Martin Dunn, commanding the boats of the Lexington. The landing was successfully accomplished, and this small force actually drove back the rebels and held them in check until they atest spirit and enthusiasm. Much praise is due to First Master Edward Shaw and Third Master James Martin, for the efficient manner in which the batteries were worked. I would particularly call your attention to the gallant conduct of Second Master Jason Goudy, in charge of the boats in shore, who succeeded in destroying the house under such heavy fire, and Gunner Hermann Peters, in charge of the howitzer, who displayed the greatest coolness and courage, although exposed to the whole fire of
Edward Shaw (search for this): chapter 74
praise cannot be given to Lieut. Commanding Shirk for the efficient manner in which his vessel was handled. My thanks are due to Capt. Phillips, Lieut. Rider, and their men, for the gallant manner in which, in the face of the enemy, they charged up the hill, drove back and held in check the rebels, until the boats' crews had effected the destruction of the house designated. The officers and men of this vessel behaved with the greatest spirit and enthusiasm. Much praise is due to First Master Edward Shaw and Third Master James Martin, for the efficient manner in which the batteries were worked. I would particularly call your attention to the gallant conduct of Second Master Jason Goudy, in charge of the boats in shore, who succeeded in destroying the house under such heavy fire, and Gunner Hermann Peters, in charge of the howitzer, who displayed the greatest coolness and courage, although exposed to the whole fire of the enemy, all but one of his men having been wounded. My thanks
Thomas M. Borland (search for this): chapter 74
saddle, and dropping three foot-soldiers. I cannot speak in too high terms of the gallantry, good discipline, and patriotic spirit evinced by the officers and men whom I have the honor to command. For the efficient services of himself and his command I am greatly indebted to First Lieut. John S. Rider, Co. K, Thirty-second regiment Illinois Volunteers. I regret to have to report the following casualties, namely: James Sullivan, seaman, killed; Patrick Sullivan, seaman, missing; Thomas M. Borland, seaman, missing; John Hines, corporal Co. K, Thirty-second regiment Illinois Volunteers, missing. James Sullivan was seen to fall upon the field, shot through the breast. During the action there were expended forty-five, eight-inch shell, twenty-five six-inch shell, and sixteen stand of grape. Two rifles and one musket are missing. They are those taken by the unfortunate men whom we have lost. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant, James W. Shirk, Lieuten
Thomas H. Kearney (search for this): chapter 74
that vicinity. You will, therefore, see the necessity of my remaining here. We expended ninety-five shells, thirty stand of grape, ten of canister, and sixty-seven rounds of shrapnel, grape, etc., from howitzer. Enclosed is Acting Assistant Surgeon T. H. Kearney's report of casualties, to whom I am indebted for his unremitting attention to the wounded. I feel confident that we inflicted a severe loss on the enemy, as several bodies were seen on the ground, and many seen to fall. I also enclose Lieut. Commanding Shirk's report. Hoping that my course will meet your approbation, I have the honor to be, etc., Wm. Gwin, Lieut. Commanding. Flag-Officer A. H. Foote. The report of Acting-Surgeon Thomas H. Kearney states the casualties as follows: On the gunboat Tyler.--Pleasant Gilbert, seaman, gunshot wound of leg, necessitating amputation of the limb; Crawford T. Hill, seaman, gunshot wound of forearm; John Matthews, seaman, gunshot (flesh) wound of shoulder, slight; G.
William B. Coleman (search for this): chapter 74
Master Jason Goudy, in charge of the boats in shore, who succeeded in destroying the house under such heavy fire, and Gunner Hermann Peters, in charge of the howitzer, who displayed the greatest coolness and courage, although exposed to the whole fire of the enemy, all but one of his men having been wounded. My thanks are also due to Pilots Hener and Sebastian, for their coolness under such a tremen dous fire of musketry, our vessel being perfectly riddled with balls. My aid, Acting Paymaster Wm. B. Coleman, rendered me valuable assistance during the action. I have sent Lieut. Commanding Shirk to Cairo with the transport Izetta, loaded with the balance of the wheat I left at Clifton. I shall remain about here, paying Pittsburgh a daily visit, which I hope will prevent the rebels from accomplishing their object. Capt. Shirk will lay before you the importance of keeping open this, as well as all other points above here. I have learned from reliable authority that the rebels
Master James Martin, for the efficient manner in which the batteries were worked. I would particularly call your attention to the gallant conduct of Second Master Jason Goudy, in charge of the boats in shore, who succeeded in destroying the house under such heavy fire, and Gunner Hermann Peters, in charge of the howitzer, who displayed the greatest coolness and courage, although exposed to the whole fire of the enemy, all but one of his men having been wounded. My thanks are also due to Pilots Hener and Sebastian, for their coolness under such a tremen dous fire of musketry, our vessel being perfectly riddled with balls. My aid, Acting Paymaster Wm. B. Coleman, rendered me valuable assistance during the action. I have sent Lieut. Commanding Shirk to Cairo with the transport Izetta, loaded with the balance of the wheat I left at Clifton. I shall remain about here, paying Pittsburgh a daily visit, which I hope will prevent the rebels from accomplishing their object. Capt. Shirk
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