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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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' feet up and down, (there was no room to walk,) as they thus worked for life, was incessantly going on. This black tread-mill of the dungeon could be heard all through the cold and dreary hours of the night. Dr. Loring, who was comparatively a humane person, besought Merion to release the unhappy men; said they had already been taxed to the point of death. The wretch replied: They did not talk right yet. He wished them to humble themselves to him. He went into the cell of one of them, Major Webber, to taunt him. Sir, said the officer, I defy you. You can kill me, but you can add nothing to the sufferings you have already inflicted. Proceed to kill me; it makes not the slightest difference. At the expiration of sixteen days the men were released from the dungeons. Merion said he would take them out this time alive, but the next time they offended they would be taken out feet foremost. Their appearance was frightful; they could no longer be recognized by their companions. With
It appears that after General Morgan's escape, suspicion alighted on the warden, a certain Captain Merion, who, it was thought, might have been corrupted. To alleviate the suspicion, (for which theial offences. On one occasion, one of our prisoners was thus immured because he refused to tell Merion which one of his companions had whistled, contrary to the prison rules. But the most terrible vred not more than six weeks ago. Some knives had been discovered in the prisoner's cells, and Merion accused the occupants of meditating their escape. Seven of them, all officers, and among them Ccold and dreary hours of the night. Dr. Loring, who was comparatively a humane person, besought Merion to release the unhappy men; said they had already been taxed to the point of death. The wretch htest difference. At the expiration of sixteen days the men were released from the dungeons. Merion said he would take them out this time alive, but the next time they offended they would be taken
March 17th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 154
Rebel prisoners in Ohio.--The following account of the treatment of rebel prisoners in the Ohio Penitentiary was given in the Richmond Examiner of March seventeenth, 1864: The experiences of this war have afforded many examples of Yankee cruelty which have produced an impression more or less distinct upon the enlightened portions of the world. But the statement which we proceed to give, takes precedence of all that has ever yet been narrated of the atrocities of the enemy; and it is so remarkable, both on account of its matter and the credit that must naturally attach to its authorship, that we doubt whether the so-called civilized world of this generation has produced anywhere any well-authenticated story of equal horror. The statement we give to our readers is that we have just taken from the lips of Captain Calvin C. Morgan, a brother of the famous General Morgan, who arrived in Richmond under the recent flag of truce, which covered the return of several hundred of our p
its authorship, that we doubt whether the so-called civilized world of this generation has produced anywhere any well-authenticated story of equal horror. The statement we give to our readers is that we have just taken from the lips of Captain Calvin C. Morgan, a brother of the famous General Morgan, who arrived in Richmond under the recent flag of truce, which covered the return of several hundred of our prisoners. Captain Morgan was among those of his brother's expedition who, i;n last July, were incarcerated in the Penitentiary of Ohio. On entering this infamous abode, Captain t Morgan and his companions were strapped in a reception-room and their naked bodies: examined there. They were again stripped in the interior of the prison, and washed in tubs bynegro convicts; their hair cut close to thle scalp, the brutal warden, who was standing by, exhorting the negro barber to cut off every d----d lock of their rebel hair. After these ceremonies, the officers were locked up in ce
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