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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 60 total hits in 26 results.

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J. J. Wistar (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 26.-expedition to Charles City courthouse. Official despatches. Fortress Monroe, Va., Dec. 14. General Wistar, with my approbation, sent out an expedition to Charles City Court-House on the James River, to capture the enemy's force stationed there, and I have the pleasure to forward his report of its complete success. What adds to the brilliancy of its achievement is that it has been accomplished during a terrible storm. B. F. Butler, Major-General. Yorktown, Va., Dec. 14, e made good by the Government. All are entitled to high commendation for gallantry and unflinching endurance, Colonel West especially, for his precise execution of a difficult combination, by which alone he could have accomplished my object. J. J. Wistar, Brigadier-General. A national account. Williamsburgh, Va., Monday, Dec. 14, 1863. An expedition composed of six companies of the First New-York Mounted Rifles and three companies of the One Hundred and Thirty-ninth New-York regim
Charles H. Smith (search for this): chapter 28
master offered two hundred dollars for his capture, and he was obliged to hide. The morning of our arrival at the Court-House, he was lying asleep in the woods, and a little boy came and woke him up, and said that the Yankees had come. He said: Go ‘way, chile; what you want to fool dis nigga for? But just then he heard the firing, and raising up, saw the blue coats of our troops on the hill. I was so glad, dat I come right away, and left all my things. The following is a list of the killed and wounded in the Mounted Rifles: Sergeant Wood, company H, killed; Corporal Smith, company H, killed; Captain L. B. Gregory, wounded severely in thigh; Sergeant Hendrickson, company H, wounded in three places; private Stoppelbein, company H, wounded; private Johnson, company H, wounded slightly; guide, wounded in arm. The rebels had three men wounded. This raid has developed some interesting facts, which I would like to impart, but forbear, on account of their military importance. C.
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 26.-expedition to Charles City courthouse. Official despatches. Fortress Monroe, Va., Dec. 14. General Wistar, with my approbation, sent out an expedition to Charles City Court-House on the James River, to capture the enemy's force stationed there, and I have the pleasure to forward his report of its complete success. What adds to the brilliancy of its achievement is that it has been accomplished during a terrible storm. B. F. Butler, Major-General. Yorktown, Va., Dec. 14, 1863. Major-General Butler: I have the satisfaction to announce the complete success of the expedition sent out under Colonel West. All worked in successful combination. Our cavalry carried the enemy's camp at Charles City Court-House after sharp fighting — the enemy firing from their houses. We captured eight officers and eighty-two enlisted men, being the whole command of three companies, fifty-five horses and three mules, besides many shot, etc., left on the ground. The enemy's camp,
in time to prevent the destruction of the bridge by a small squad of guerrillas, who retired after exchanging a few shots, wounding the guide severely. We arrived in Williamsburgh yesterday afternoon. The fair portion of the inhabitants behaved any thing but amiably when they beheld the result of the expedition, in so many prisoners. The rank and file of the captured party appeared rather happy, than otherwise, with their sudden escape from rebeldom. One (a nephew of United States Senator Bowden) took the oath of allegiance, and several seemed disposed to do so. The officers, of course, are as bitter as their systematic schooling to pervert the use of the five senses will make any one. Captain Rodgers, in command, owned nearly all the horses and equipments, and he reckons his loss heavily. Among the captured was a young woman in soldier's clothes. We brought into our lines quite a large number of contrabands. The rebel officers told them they were not compelled to come. We
Hendrickson (search for this): chapter 28
master offered two hundred dollars for his capture, and he was obliged to hide. The morning of our arrival at the Court-House, he was lying asleep in the woods, and a little boy came and woke him up, and said that the Yankees had come. He said: Go ‘way, chile; what you want to fool dis nigga for? But just then he heard the firing, and raising up, saw the blue coats of our troops on the hill. I was so glad, dat I come right away, and left all my things. The following is a list of the killed and wounded in the Mounted Rifles: Sergeant Wood, company H, killed; Corporal Smith, company H, killed; Captain L. B. Gregory, wounded severely in thigh; Sergeant Hendrickson, company H, wounded in three places; private Stoppelbein, company H, wounded; private Johnson, company H, wounded slightly; guide, wounded in arm. The rebels had three men wounded. This raid has developed some interesting facts, which I would like to impart, but forbear, on account of their military importance. C.
ir portion of the inhabitants behaved any thing but amiably when they beheld the result of the expedition, in so many prisoners. The rank and file of the captured party appeared rather happy, than otherwise, with their sudden escape from rebeldom. One (a nephew of United States Senator Bowden) took the oath of allegiance, and several seemed disposed to do so. The officers, of course, are as bitter as their systematic schooling to pervert the use of the five senses will make any one. Captain Rodgers, in command, owned nearly all the horses and equipments, and he reckons his loss heavily. Among the captured was a young woman in soldier's clothes. We brought into our lines quite a large number of contrabands. The rebel officers told them they were not compelled to come. We told them they were not compelled to stay. They seemed to value our word most, and came. One of them, an athletic, pure-blooded African, was relating his adventures. He said his master, in Richmond, had so
R. M. West (search for this): chapter 28
tisfaction to announce the complete success of the expedition sent out under Colonel West. All worked in successful combination. Our cavalry carried the enemy's caml are entitled to high commendation for gallantry and unflinching endurance, Colonel West especially, for his precise execution of a difficult combination, by which amiles beyond the Chickahominy. The expedition was under the direction of Colonel R. M. West, the present commander of this post; the cavalry was commanded by Colonele. Here, apparently, fate had a choice bivouac in store for us — but not so Colonel West. The guides lit matches, which blazed for a moment, (just long enough to exge was led by the field-officers of the regiment, with Colonel Onderdonk and Colonel West. It was irresistible. In less than fifteen minutes we captured ninety prisetired leisurely across the Chickahominy. Here the regiment rested awhile. Colonel West sent a small party to secure Diascon Creek bridge. The party arrived just i
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 28
aster offered two hundred dollars for his capture, and he was obliged to hide. The morning of our arrival at the Court-House, he was lying asleep in the woods, and a little boy came and woke him up, and said that the Yankees had come. He said: Go ‘way, chile; what you want to fool dis nigga for? But just then he heard the firing, and raising up, saw the blue coats of our troops on the hill. I was so glad, dat I come right away, and left all my things. The following is a list of the killed and wounded in the Mounted Rifles: Sergeant Wood, company H, killed; Corporal Smith, company H, killed; Captain L. B. Gregory, wounded severely in thigh; Sergeant Hendrickson, company H, wounded in three places; private Stoppelbein, company H, wounded; private Johnson, company H, wounded slightly; guide, wounded in arm. The rebels had three men wounded. This raid has developed some interesting facts, which I would like to impart, but forbear, on account of their military importance. C.
Stoppelbein (search for this): chapter 28
aster offered two hundred dollars for his capture, and he was obliged to hide. The morning of our arrival at the Court-House, he was lying asleep in the woods, and a little boy came and woke him up, and said that the Yankees had come. He said: Go ‘way, chile; what you want to fool dis nigga for? But just then he heard the firing, and raising up, saw the blue coats of our troops on the hill. I was so glad, dat I come right away, and left all my things. The following is a list of the killed and wounded in the Mounted Rifles: Sergeant Wood, company H, killed; Corporal Smith, company H, killed; Captain L. B. Gregory, wounded severely in thigh; Sergeant Hendrickson, company H, wounded in three places; private Stoppelbein, company H, wounded; private Johnson, company H, wounded slightly; guide, wounded in arm. The rebels had three men wounded. This raid has developed some interesting facts, which I would like to impart, but forbear, on account of their military importance. C.
William Roberts (search for this): chapter 28
ew-York Mounted Rifles and three companies of the One Hundred and Thirty-ninth New-York regiment, has just returned from a highly successful raid to Charles City Court-House, situated near the north bank of the James River, and seven miles beyond the Chickahominy. The expedition was under the direction of Colonel R. M. West, the present commander of this post; the cavalry was commanded by Colonel B. F. Onderdonk, and the infantry, which acted as a reserve this side the Chickahominy, by Colonel Roberts. The infantry preceded the cavalry twelve hours. The Mounted Rifles quitted Williamsburgh at six o'clock on the evening of the eleventh instant, under lowering clouds, and an atmosphere that presaged storm. We made a brief halt at Twelve-Mile Ordinary. After leaving this point, our route lay through dense forests of pine and dreary patches of cleared but uncultivated land. As night and the column advanced, the darkness became terrible, the wind fairly roared through the tall trees
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