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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Lafayette (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
lly, your obedient servant, E. O. C. Ord, Major-General Vols., Commanding Thirteenth Army Corps. Official Copy. C. A. Nichols, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Washburn's report. headquarters detachment Thirteenth army corps, Vermillion bridge, November 7, 1863. Major William Hoffman, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I inclose herewith report of Brigadier-General Burbridge, in regard to the battle of Grand Coteau, on the third instant. Also of Lieutenant-Colonel Robinson, cnel Fonda, with about five hundred mounted infantry, was also ordered to encamp near him. The troops all moved and went into camp as ordered. The Nineteenth corps on the same day moved back to Carrion Crow Bayou, and on the following day to Vermillionville, leaving the Third and First brigades of the Fourth division of the Thirteenth corps, to hold the positions before named. The position of the troops, on the morning of the third instant, was then as follows: Brigadier-General Burbridge, wit
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
en prisoners, represent the number of wounded as being very large. We took sixty-five prisoners. Brigadier-General McGinnis, being very ill, was not able to be on the field. The troops of the division behaved admirably under the command of Brigadier-General Cameron, of the First, and Colonel Slack, of the Second brigade. The action of General Burbridge was gallant and judicious, from the time I first saw him until the close of the engagement. The conduct of the Sixty-seventh regiment Indiana infantry was inexplicable, and their surrender can only be attributed to the incompetency or cowardice of the commanding officer. They had not a single man killed. Our mounted force, under Colonels Fonda and Robinson, though very small, behaved very handsomely. I left at Carrion Crow Bayou, to hold that position, three regiments of the Third division, namely, the Eleventh Indiana, Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, and Twenty-fourth Iowa, with one section of artillery. It was fortunate that I did
Bayou Bourbeau (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
4. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received, of the affair at Bayou Bourbeaux, of November third, 1863. Disparaging remarks having appeared in a large part of the public newspapers, upon the management of this affair, by Major-Generasconsin State Journal account. New-Orleans, La., Nov. 9, 1863. I returned yesterday from Opelousas, and hasten to give you the details of a contest at Bayou Bourbeaux, about nine miles this side of that village, which took place on the third of November, involving, as you will see, very important results to the Twenty-thirdbrigade,) in which were the troops I was assigned to pay, was at Bear's Landing, eleven miles in advance of Opelousas, and came in on another road, camping at Bayou Bourbeaux, three miles nearer Opelousas than the balance of the corps. Impatient to see the boys of the Twenty-third, I went out the same night to their camp, and was
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received, of the affair at Bayou Bourbeaux, of November third, 1863. Disparaging remarks having appeared in a large part of the public newspapers, upon the management of this affair, by Major-General Washburn, I beg to call attention to the report of that officer, to that of General Burbridge, Colonel Guppy, Twenty-third Wisconsin volunteers, and the order of march of Major-General Franklin, by which it will be seen that General Washburne was at his prescribed post, with his command, on the morning of the attack, and that it was owing to his zeal and diligence that the rear-guard, when attacked, were reinforced promptly, and the enemy driven away discomfited. Li
Grand Coteau (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received,mber 7, 1863. Major William Hoffman, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I inclose herewith report of Brigadier-General Burbridge, in regard to the battle of Grand Coteau, on the third instant. Also of Lieutenant-Colonel Robinson, commanding Seconds Louisiana cavalry, and statements of Captain Simms, Sixty-seventh Indiana, and encamp at Carrion Crow Bayou, while General Burbridge, with the troops under his command, was ordered to march down the Teche and cross it, and move by way of Grand Coteau, where the road from Vermillion to Opelousas crosses Muddy Bayou, about three miles from Carrion Crow Bayou, in the direction of Opelousas, and go into camp th
Madison (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
their breakfast. About nine o'clock the Seventeenth Ohio battery went out on the prairie and shelled the woods on the left for half an hour, about fifty rebel cavalry having shown themselves on that side. The line of battle was re-formed, and so remained until the action took place at a later hour. During all this time, and until the final clinch, we all supposed it to be a mere guerrilla annoyance, that no serious attack was contemplated — and felt quite as safe as if in the streets of Madison. The voting went on, and was nearly completed in most of the companies, and four of them were sent in from the line and paid. About half-past 11, Colonel Guppy ordered dinner prepared for his men, with a good cup of coffee for each, saying jocosely he could not ask his regiment to fight first-class on an empty stomach. He had his own dinner also prepared, and while we were partaking of it was in particularly good spirits. When nearly through, we heard sharp picket-firing far on the ri
Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nd about one hundred prisoners. As their attacking force came up eight lines deep, the bullets must have told terribly upon them. Of the result of the election in the Twenty-third, nothing specific can be stated. The vote for the Union ticket was nearly unanimous; but the poll-lists of part of the companies were lost; and of those saved, there is generally a lack of officers left to make out the certificates. In one company, one inspector was killed, one taken prisoner, with both clerks — leaving but one officer of the board. I advised him to append an affidavit of the facts, but what will be done I do not know. Both the Thirteenth and Nineteenth Corps had fallen back to Vermillion Bayou, when I left there on Saturday. It is reported that the Thirteenth has been ordered to Memphis; it belongs to Grant's army proper. It is reported also, and believed, that Brownsville, Texas, is in possession of General Banks. If so, my next assignment will take me to the Rio Grande. H. A.
E. O. C. Ord (search for this): chapter 9
Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received, of the affair at Bayou Bourbeaux, of November third, 1863. Disparaging remarks having appeared in a large part of the public newspapers, upon the management of thn for examination for competency, as soon as he joins the corps. He is at present (I am unofficially informed) at a camp of paroled or exchanged prisoners, somewhere in this Department. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. O. C. Ord, Major-General Vols., Commanding Thirteenth Army Corps. Official Copy. C. A. Nichols, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Washburn's report. headquarters detachment Thirteenth army corps, Vermillion bridge, November 7, 1863. Major W
out one thousand two hundred strong, with one six-gun battery of ten-pounder Parrotts, and Colonel Fonda, with about five hundred mounted infantry and a section o fNimms's battery, on the north side of Muddy Bayou; and the Third division, General McGinnis commanding, three thousand strong, with one battery, at Carrion Crow Bayou, tthe exception of one tenpounder Parrott gun, which was captured just as it was crossing the bayou, the horses having been shot. The bringing off of the section of Nimms's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Marland, after the regiment sent to its support had surrendered, extorted the admiration of every beholder. While the fight was we had the consolation of seeing the tallest kind of a race, in which we were not partners. This check saved the train. The guns we are so much indebted to were Nimms's Massachusetts battery. It did wonders that day. It was with a sense of terrible oppression about the heart that I looked over at the little group of the brig
Alonzo G. Jack (search for this): chapter 9
ber — were in the old camp, and then came the imperturbable Dwight Tredway, Quartermaster of the Twenty-third, with that perpetual smile on his face, looking for his trains, without the slightest trace of alarm or excitement. From him we learned that about ninety of the boys were left, and subsequently the number increased to about a hundred--that Colonel Guppy was wounded and a prisoner, Captain Sorenson the same; that Captain Bull was taken prisoner; that the brave and daring soldier, Alonzo G. Jack, and some others were killed, and so of a long list of neighbors and friends. I started at once for the field, but meeting General Washburn, was informed that the whole force was ordered back to Carrion-Crow Bayou, and that it was useless to proceed, as they would leave before I would reach the old camp, so we fell back to headquarters to wait for them. It was long after dark before they arrived. I stood upon the bridge full two hours waiting for them. They came up joking and laugh
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