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Montauk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
t. On the seventh of April, in the afternoon, the enemy moved forward to the attack, in single file--seven single-turreted monitors, to wit: Weehawken, Catskill, Montauk, Nantucket, Passaic, Nahant, and Patapsco, the Keokuk with two fixed turrets, and the New Ironsides — the Weehawken leading, the New Ironsides fifth in the order h of April, and number of Shot received by each Iron-clad, copied from United States Journals:  Rounds. New Ironsides fired8 Catskill fired25 Keokuk fired3 Montauk fired26 Nantucket fired15 Passaic fired9 Nahant fired24 Weehawken fired26 Patapsco fired18   Total154 New Ironsides received of shots65 Keokuk received of shots90 Weehawken received of shots60 Montauk received of shots20 Passaic received of shots58 Nantucket received of shots51 Catskill received of shots51 Patapsco received of shots45 Nahant received of shots80   Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Report of Colonel Alfred Rhett of engagement of Seventh of April,
Palmetto (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
At two o'clock P. M., April seventh, instant, the whole iron-clad fleet advanced to the attack in the following order, viz.: four monitors were in the advance, led by the Passaic; the Ironsides came next, followed by three other single turreted monitors, and the Keokuk, a double-turreted monitor, bringing up the rear. At thirty minutes past two P. M., the long roll was beaten, and every disposition made for action. At fifty-five minutes past two P. M., the garrison, regimental and Palmetto flags were hoisted, and saluted by thirteen guns, the band playing the national airs. At three o'clock P. M., the action was opened by a shot from Fort Moultrie. At three minutes past three P. M., the leading vessel having approached to within about fourteen hundred yards of the fort, she fired two shots simultaneously, one, a fifteen-inch shrapnel, which burst; both passed over the fort. The batteries were opened upon her two minutes later, the firing being by battery. The action now
Oyster Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
is Island, besides two companies of artillery under Captains Chichester and Matthews, the garrison of Battery Wagner, and one at Battery Gregg, under Captain Lesesne, all the artillery under Lieutenant-Colonel James A. Yates, First South Carolina artillery. Alter about three hours furious shelling from the enemy, to which our guns steadily replied, a large number of barges, filled with troops, came up Little Folly River, and, under cover of their fire, succeeded in effecting a landing at Oyster Point, and the main shore of Morris Island. The enemy advanced immediately, driving back our inferior force of infantry, and succeeded in expelling our troops from the south end of Morris Island, and capturing the artillery above named, with its munitions. This was not effected without a severe struggle, in which we lost two hundred and ninety-four killed, wounded, and missing, among whom I mention, with especial regret, the following officers: Captain Cheves and Haskell, and Lieutenant Bee,
Gregg's Hill (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
at my disposal offered, and on Tuesday morning relieved Colonel Graham of the command of the troops, including the garrisons of Forts Wagner and Gregg. I found that the abolitionists occupied the island, in force, from the southern part to Gregg's Hill, upon which they were already erecting batteries, and had constructed a signal station; that they had thrown forward their skirmishers to a point indicated by a single palmetto tree, one mile and a quarter to their front, and about three quarttime, not to repairs, but to improvements at Forts Wagner and Gregg. During these three days, the enemy, under cover of the sand-hills, erected batteries on land, the nearest being about three-quarters of a mile off, and others extending from Gregg's Hill to the left, and distant about one mile and three-quarters from Fort Wagner. These batteries were gradually unmasked, and were, with the exception of the first, entirely without range of our guns. On Saturday morning, the eighteenth instan
Fort Ripley (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
the second circle, the centre of which will be at a point about midway between Forts Sumter and Ripley, and to the southward of the middle ground shoal. It will be formed by the heavy guns of Fort Johnson, Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney, Battery Bee, and the north-western and western faces of Fort Sumter. The guns of Forts Johnson and Ripley and Castle Pinckney will open on the leading vesselsRipley and Castle Pinckney will open on the leading vessels as they come within easy range, care being taken that every shot finds its mark. Those of Fort Sumter and Battery Bee will continue upon the leading vessels as long as they are close, but if they elction by the guns of White Point battery and Battery Glover, with such guns of Forts Johnson and Ripley and Castle Pinckney as will bear. Concentration on the leading vessels will be the object as beattempt to pass by Folly channel. If he does, a circle of fire will be formed by the guns of Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney, and White Point battery. The position of torpedoes will be communicated
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
tion of the enemy's troops, transports, and iron-clad vessels at Port Royal, during the months of February and March, and subsequently, in the North Edisto and Stono Rivers, having convinced me that the long threatened attack on Charleston was immediately impending, every possible precaution was at once made for the exigency, incles of my command, commencing on the eighth instant, on which day the enemy's iron-clad fleet appeared off the bar, and his force of transports at sea and in the Stono River was largely increased, indicating the renewal of the attack on the approaches of the city of Charleston. With the limited force at my command, such measures ase attack, one led by Brigadier-General A. H. Colquitt, and the other by Brigadier-General Hagood in person. The enemy was protected by the fire of his gunboats in Stono and Little Folly Rivers. Brigadier--General Hagood succeeded in driving the enemy, about two thousand in number, from James Island, and inflicting upon him a seri
Schooner Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
S. C., August 7, 1863. Respectfully forwarded for the information of the War Department. In view of the possibility that Batteries Wagner and Gregg, which are only outworks, mounting respectively twelve and three guns, might fall under the concentrated fire of the enemy's numerous and powerful land and naval batteries, I determined, immediately after the fall of the south end of Morris Island into the possession of the enemy to establish a circle of batteries from Legare's Point, on Schooner Creek, James Island, to Battery Beauregard, on Sullivan's Island, so as to concentrate their fire (including Forts Sumter and Moultrie) on Morris Island, from about half its length to Cummins' Point, and render that portion of the island untenable to the enemy, should he succeed in driving us away from it. That defensive system is now being carried out to the extent of our available means in labor and heavy ordnance. Many of the long range guns in Sumter, not absolutely required for its defen
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
along the parapet to the left and on the top of the magazine to approach their rear, they surrendered. In front of the fort, the scene of carnage is indescribable. The repulse was overwhelming, and the loss of the enemy could not have been less than two thousand (2,000) in killed, wounded, and prisoners, perhaps much more. Our loss I estimate at fifty killed, and one hundred and fifty wounded, but will forward an exact return. The assailants consisted of troops from Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Hamphire, Ohio, and New York, and the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts negro regiment (under Colonel Shaw, who was killed), under the command of Brigadier-General Strong. The supports were commanded by Brigadier-General----. I will hereafter make a supplementary report, and give such details as may be required. As to the damage done to the work and guns, I have the honor to refer you to the reports of the Engineer Officer and Chief of Artillery, which will be forwarded. I will re
Catskill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
the afternoon, the enemy moved forward to the attack, in single file--seven single-turreted monitors, to wit: Weehawken, Catskill, Montauk, Nantucket, Passaic, Nahant, and Patapsco, the Keokuk with two fixed turrets, and the New Ironsides — the Weehal, and number of Shot received by each Iron-clad, copied from United States Journals:  Rounds. New Ironsides fired8 Catskill fired25 Keokuk fired3 Montauk fired26 Nantucket fired15 Passaic fired9 Nahant fired24 Weehawken fired26 Patapsco Weehawken received of shots60 Montauk received of shots20 Passaic received of shots58 Nantucket received of shots51 Catskill received of shots51 Patapsco received of shots45 Nahant received of shots80   Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staurreted vessels, carrying (supposed) two guns in each, presumed to be the Montauk, Passaic, Weehawkeh, Patapsco, Nahant, Catskill, and Nantucket, which took position from nine hundred to fifteen hundred yards from Fort Sumter. They steamed up main
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
, for constantly exerted services, in securing for the defence of Charleston so many of the heaviest guns wielded so effectually. The Confederate States iron-clad ships, Palmetto State and Chicora, under the command of Captain J. R. Tucker, C. S. N., as soon as the enemy advanced to the attack, took their positions (previously arranged), ready to perform their part in the conflict, at the opportune moment. On the day after the combat, Flag Officer Lynch, C. S. N., arrived here from North Carolina, with an effective detachment of sailor artillerists, to tender service in any battery. He was assigned to a most responsible position — Cummins' Point battery--but was in three days thereafter recalled by the Navy Department. The flags and trophies sent herewith were taken from the wreck of the Keokuk, by Lieutenant W. T. Glassell, C. S. N. The more material trophies, two eleven-inch Dahlgren pieces, now in battery, were recovered, under the supervision of General Ripley, by the mec
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