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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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Mystic River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 9: public buildings. First meeting-house. First meeting-house, 1696. during the first years of their residence in Medford, our pious ancestors were not sufficiently numerous and rich to support a minister of the gospel; hence they joined the churches of Cambridge, Charlestown, Watertown, Woburn, and Malden. That they had preaching in the town at funerals and baptisms, is most probable; but the loss of our earliest records prevents our stating any specific action on the subject till about 1690, when the desire to build a meeting-house became strong and effectual. They worshipped in private rooms; and we find a vote of the town to pay Thomas Willis thirty shillings for the use of his rooms for one year. January 17, 1693, we find the following record:-- At a general town-meeting of the inhabitants of Medford, being fifteen days warned, voted that there shall be a meeting-house erected, to be finished the first of October following, on the land of Mr. Thomas
Meeting House (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e: To place the new meeting-house either on the north or south side of the country road, on a piece of land belonging to John Bradshaw, jun. This spot was afterwards rejected. More unanimity began now to prevail in this matter; and a committee was chosen whose wisdom and impartiality harmonized every thing. The spot selected was,on the south side of the country road, near Marble Brook, four or five rods south-east of the bridge now across that stream, which afterwards took the name of Meeting-house Brook, and retains it to this day. The land was owned by that self-made and thrifty farmer, Mr. John Albree; and on the 10th of January, 1726, the town voted to give fifty-five pounds for one acre, and to appropriate three hundred and sixty pounds for the building of the house. The committee appointed to determine the size and shape of the house were Thomas Tufts, Esq., Captain Ebenezer Brooks, Mr. Peter Seccombe, Mr. John Richardson, Captain Samuel Brooks, Mr. John Willis, Mr. William
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
feet posts. This report was accepted, and the same committee empowered to build the house. Every thing now went on harmoniously; and we can easily imagine the appearance of the new house,--more than twice as high as its predecessor, and about twice as large. The steeple, rising from the centre of the four-faced roof, gave to the structure an appearance like that of the old meeting-house now standing in Hingham, Mass., which was built in 1680. Some of us remember the old meeting-house in Lynn, built about the same time, after the same model. Aug. 24, 1727 : Voted to meet in the new meeting-house sabbath-day after next. Accordingly, on Sunday, Sept. 3, 1727, the inhabitants of Medford met for the first time in their new house; and Rev. Mr. Turell preached an appropriate sermon from Psalm LXXXIV. 1: How amiable are thy tabernacles, O Lord of hosts! Any special dedicatory services would have been distasteful to a people who had not forgotten the superstitions of Popery, or the p
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
place the committee. There is no account of any separate religious services at the laying of the corner-stone, or for the dedication of the house. Whether our Puritan fathers feared being too Jewish, or too Popish, or too Episcopal, we know not. Thus our ancestors provided themselves with their first house for public worship Jesus. 6. Popish holidays. 7. Consecrating churches. 8. Organs and cathedral-music. 9. The Book of Common Prayer. 10. A church government by bishops. Our Puritan forefathers having procured their second house for public worship of a size commensurate with their numbers, and at a cost proportionate to their wealth, their fibuilding was $5,941.26. Its dimensions now are ninety-two feet ridge, eighty-three feet body, and forty feet width. Alms-houses. Our intelligent and thrifty Puritan ancestors had no need of alms-houses. They who came here were the robust and young; and they insisted on obedience to the text, He that will not work, neither sh
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
An authentic record from another town, under date of Sept. 13, 1773, may make this matter clear: Voted to provide one barrel of West India rum, five barrels of New England rum, one barrel of good brown sugar, half a box of good lemons, and two loaves of loaf sugar, for framing and raising the meeting-house. Here a natural consequrespectable exterior, with a commodious and appropriate interior. It is agreeable to one's mind to contrast the three forms of meeting-houses which obtained in New England up to this time. The first was a one-story, square building, in naked and uncheerful simplicity, with straw-thatched roof; lighted, not by glass windows, but be other, sitting on wooden benches, in January, under a thatched roof, with one or two open window-places, without stoves, singing Sternhold and Hopkins and the New England Psalms, and then listening to a two-hours' service with devotion! On Sunday, March 11, 1770, our fathers and mothers, with their entire families, entered, fo
Hingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ld a meeting-house fifty-two feet large, thirty-eight feet wide, and thirty-three feet posts. This report was accepted, and the same committee empowered to build the house. Every thing now went on harmoniously; and we can easily imagine the appearance of the new house,--more than twice as high as its predecessor, and about twice as large. The steeple, rising from the centre of the four-faced roof, gave to the structure an appearance like that of the old meeting-house now standing in Hingham, Mass., which was built in 1680. Some of us remember the old meeting-house in Lynn, built about the same time, after the same model. Aug. 24, 1727 : Voted to meet in the new meeting-house sabbath-day after next. Accordingly, on Sunday, Sept. 3, 1727, the inhabitants of Medford met for the first time in their new house; and Rev. Mr. Turell preached an appropriate sermon from Psalm LXXXIV. 1: How amiable are thy tabernacles, O Lord of hosts! Any special dedicatory services would have been d
John Francis (search for this): chapter 10
ribed by the following persons: Thomas Willis, Caleb Brooks, Stephen Francis, Stephen Willis, John Francis, John Whitmore, John Bradshoe, Jonathan Tufts, John Hall, jun., Nathaniel Hall, Stephen Hall,iam Willis. Stephen Hall. Jonathan Hall. Stephen Willis. Oliver Attwood. Abner Harris. John Francis. Samuel Francis. Thomas Willis. John Whitmore. John Francis. Ebenezer Brooks. Francis John Francis. Ebenezer Brooks. Francis Whitmore. Samuel Brooks. William Pottony. Thomas Hall. As this subject created local or territorial interests. it was prudently thought best not to force any measure relating to it. More than ardson, Captain Samuel Brooks, Mr. John Willis, Mr. William Willis, Lieutenant Stephen Hall, Mr. John Francis, Mr. Benjamin Parker, and Mr. John Whitmore. They reported that it would be proper for thie eventful catalogue in the order fixed according to the supposed social rank of each:-- Mr. John Francis, sen., Mr. John Bradshaw, Captain Ebenezer Brooks, Captain Samuel Brooks, Lieutenant Stephe
Ebenezer Blanchard (search for this): chapter 10
17 Samuel Tufts, 2d18 Benjamin Teal19 Timothy Tufts20 Henry Fowle21 James Tufts22 Richard Hall23 Isaac Hall24 Thomas Seccombe25 Benjamin Hall26 Minister's Pew27 Isaac Royal28 Timothy Newhall29 Peter Jones30 Nathan Tufts, jun.31 Timothy Hall32 Hezekiah Blanchard33 Thomas Patten34 Joseph Thompson35 Henry Putnam36 Seth Blodget37 Willis Hall38 Jacob Hall39 John Leathe40 Samuel Jenks41 Andrew Hall42 Isaac Warren43 Isaac Greenleaf44 Samuel Kidder45 Simon Tufts46 Ebenezer Blanchard47 Edward Brooks48 It is specially recorded, that, at the raising of this meeting-house, which took place July 26 and 27, 1769, there was no one hurt. That such an exemption was remarkable, at that period, may be explained by the fact, that probably our fathers did not put themselves into that condition which generally secures catastrophies. An authentic record from another town, under date of Sept. 13, 1773, may make this matter clear: Voted to provide one barrel of West India
Thomas Seccombe (search for this): chapter 10
osen according to the vote of the town and the tenor of subscription, Feb. 8, 1770, as follows :-- Thomas Brooks, jun.No. 1 John Bishop2 Stephen Hall3 Aaron Hall4 Ebenezer Hall5 John Wade6 Samuel Hall7 Watts Turner8 William Tufts, 3d9 William Tufts10 Simon Bradshaw11 Samuel Angier12 Francis Burns13 Zachary Pool14 Jonathan Patten15 E. Hall16 Nathan Tufts17 Samuel Tufts, 2d18 Benjamin Teal19 Timothy Tufts20 Henry Fowle21 James Tufts22 Richard Hall23 Isaac Hall24 Thomas Seccombe25 Benjamin Hall26 Minister's Pew27 Isaac Royal28 Timothy Newhall29 Peter Jones30 Nathan Tufts, jun.31 Timothy Hall32 Hezekiah Blanchard33 Thomas Patten34 Joseph Thompson35 Henry Putnam36 Seth Blodget37 Willis Hall38 Jacob Hall39 John Leathe40 Samuel Jenks41 Andrew Hall42 Isaac Warren43 Isaac Greenleaf44 Samuel Kidder45 Simon Tufts46 Ebenezer Blanchard47 Edward Brooks48 It is specially recorded, that, at the raising of this meeting-house, which took place July
Galen James (search for this): chapter 10
house. The town has taken laudable pride, of late years, in building proper schoolhouses. The following table records the facts:-- When Built.location.building-Committee.master-workmen.cost. 1835.Primary, Union Street.Horatio A. Smith, Galen James, and Milton James.Caldwell & Wyatt.$1040.00. 1837.Primary, Park Street.Galen James, James W. Brooks, James O. Curtis, & Saml. Joyce.Oakman Joyce and John Sables.3454.64. 1840.High & Grammar, High Street.Oakman Joyce, D. Lawrence, and James OGalen James, James W. Brooks, James O. Curtis, & Saml. Joyce.Oakman Joyce and John Sables.3454.64. 1840.High & Grammar, High Street.Oakman Joyce, D. Lawrence, and James O. Curtis.Charles Caldwell & Wm. B. Thomas.7568.77. 1851.Brooks, Brooks Street.John B. Hatch and James M. Usher.George A. Caldwell.2542.98. 1851.Primary, Salem Street.Geo. T. Goodwin, Henry Taylor, and M. E. Knox.J. J. Beaty and I. H. Bradlee.3375.41. 1852.Everett, Salem Street.Robert L. Ells, Samuel Joyce, and Henry Taylor.James Pierce.7166.57. The town proceeded immediately to the building of a new schoolhouse, on the spot where the Park-street house was burned. April 2, 1855, Messrs.
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