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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
s of march, the various corps of the Army of the Potomac set out from the banks of the North Anna on the night of May 26, 1864, at the times and by the routes assigned to them. Early on the morning of May 27th Lee set his force in motion by the Telegraph road and such others as were available, across the Little and South Anna rivers toward Ashland and Atlee's Station on the Virginia Central Railroad. Thus the armies were stretched like two live wires along the swampy bottom-lands of eastern Virginia, and as they came in contact, here and there along the line, there were the inevitable sputterings of flame and considerable destruction wrought. The advance Federal infantry crossed the Pamunkey, after the cavalry, at Hanoverstown, early on May 28th. The Second Corps was close behind the Sixth; the Fifth was over by noon, while the Ninth, now an integral portion of the Army of the Potomac, passed the river by midnight. On the 31st General Sheridan reached Cold Harbor, which Meade
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
al-in-chief that Lee had cleaved the Army of the Potomac into two separated bodies. To reenforce either wing would require two crossings of the river, while Lee could quickly march troops from one side to the other within his impregnable wedge. As Grant put it in his report, To make a direct attack from either wing would cause a slaughter of our men that even success would not justify. former by Breckinridge, and the scattered forces in western Virginia, and by Pickett and Hoke from North Carolina. From Bermuda Hundred where General Butler was bottled up --to use a phrase which Grant employed and afterward regretted-General W. F. Smith was ordered to bring the Eighteenth Corps of the Army of the James to the assistance of Meade, since Butler could defend his position perfectly well with a small force, and could make no headway against Beauregard with a large one. Grant had now nearly one hundred and fourteen thousand troops and Lee about eighty thousand. Sheridan's appearance
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Sheridan's appearance at Cold Harbor was resented in vain by Fitzhugh Lee, and the next morning, June 1st, the Sixth Corps arrived, followed by General Smith and ten thousand men of the Eighteenth, who had hastened from the landing-place at White House. These took position on the right of the Sixth, and the Federal line was promptly faced by Longstreet's corps, a part of A. P. Hill's, and the divisions of Hoke and Breckinridge. At six o'clock in the afternoon Wright and Smith advanced to tthe Ninth Corps, was placed near Bethesda Church on the road to Mechanicsville, while Warren, with the Fifth, came to his left and connected with Smith's right. Sheridan was sent to hold the lower Chickahominy bridges and to cover the road to White House, Improvised breastworks The End of the Gray Line at Cold Harbor. Here at the extreme left of the Confederate lines at Cold Harbor is an example of the crude protection resorted to by the soldiers on both sides in advance or retreat. A
Coldbrook (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Cold Harbor Waiting the word for the Cold Harbor flanking march--Union troops repulsed at the North Anna Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 186. As the General-in-Chief of all the Federal armies sits smoking with his back to the smaller tree, two extraordinary things are happening: Grant is arriving at the tremendous decision to fight it out that cost him ten thousand men the next morning; and the enterprising photographer with the Union army has climbed upstairs in the little roadside meeting house (Bethesda Church, on the way to Cold Harbor), and is photographing the scene again and again. The result is a veritable moving picture series of Grant in the field — an opportunity without a parallel to witness the acting of history itself. The informal consultation which the pictures reveal was as near a council of war as Grant ever came. Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 1864--the first scene Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 1864--the se
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ler, was not a town but the meeting-place of several roads of great strategic importance to the Federal army. They led not only toward Richmond by the way of the upper Chickahominy bridges, but in the direction of White House Landing, on the Pamunkey River. Both Lee and Meade had received reenforcements — the Ready for the advance that Lee drove back Between these luxuriant banks stretch the pontoons and bridges to facilitate the rapid crossing of the North Anna by Hancock's Corps on Mhe 6th and 7th, but he soon desisted and retired to his entrenchments. The losses to the Federal army in this battle and the engagements which preceded it were over seventeen thousand, Back to the old base White House Landing, on the Pamunkey River, bustles with life in June, 1864. Once more, just before the battle of Cold Harbor, McClellan's old headquarters at the outset of the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 springs into great activity. River steamers and barges discharge their cargoes
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
azards. This place, probably named after the old home of some English settler, was not a town but the meeting-place of several roads of great strategic importance to the Federal army. They led not only toward Richmond by the way of the upper Chickahominy bridges, but in the direction of White House Landing, on the Pamunkey River. Both Lee and Meade had received reenforcements — the Ready for the advance that Lee drove back Between these luxuriant banks stretch the pontoons and bridgesn the left of General Wright. Burnside, with the Ninth Corps, was placed near Bethesda Church on the road to Mechanicsville, while Warren, with the Fifth, came to his left and connected with Smith's right. Sheridan was sent to hold the lower Chickahominy bridges and to cover the road to White House, Improvised breastworks The End of the Gray Line at Cold Harbor. Here at the extreme left of the Confederate lines at Cold Harbor is an example of the crude protection resorted to by the sold
minutes with General Grant--the third scene It is due to the courtesy of General Horace Porter, himself an actor in these three scenes as a member of Grant's staff, that so many participants in the historic episode can here be identified. In the first picture (on the facing page) General Porter himself sits reading a newspaper on Grant's right, and on his left is General Rawlins, his chief of staff, next to Colonel Ely S. Parker. General Grant impassively listens to the report that Colonel Bowers, his adjutant-general, is reading as he stands inside the circle to the right of the picture. In the second picture (immediately above) the General-in-Chief has arisen and walked to the left, where he leans over General Meade's shoulder and consults his map. In front of them a newly arrived officer bends forward, receiving orders or reporting. Colonel Parker has passed his newspaper to another officer. The rest of the group center their looks upon Grant. Soldiers from the Third Divis
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 6
ckett and Hoke from North Carolina. From Bermuda Hundred where General Butler was bottled up --to use a phrase which Grant employed and afterth Corps of the Army of the James to the assistance of Meade, since Butler could defend his position perfectly well with a small force, and corder to bring him nearer to Richmond and to the friendly hand which Butler with the Army of the James was in a position to reach out to him. Lly hazardous one. More than fifty miles intervened between him and Butler by the roads he would have to travel, and he had to cross both the t at the Chickahominy, or he might, if he chose, descend rapidly on Butler and crush him before Grant could unite with him. But, says Grant, tant took steamer and ran up the river to Bermuda Hundred to see General Butler and direct the movement against Petersburg, that began the finaetersburg and confront Lee once more. General Gillmore was sent by Butler, with cavalry and infantry, on June 10th to make the capture, but w
elf but six miles from the outworks of Richmond, while the Chickahominy cut off any further flanking movement. There was nothing to do but fight it out, and Grant ordered an attack all along the line. On June 3d he hurled the Army of the Potomac against the inferior numbers of Lee, and in a brave assault upon the Confederate entrenchments, lost ten thousand men in twenty minutes. Grant's assault at Cold Harbor was marked by the gallantry of General Hancock's division and of the brigades of Gibbon and Barlow, who on the left of the Federal line charged up the ascent in their front upon the concentrated artillery of the Confederates; they took the position and held it for a moment under a galling fire, which finally drove them back, but not until they had captured a flag and three hundred prisoners. The battle was substantially over by half-past 7 in the morning, but sullen fighting continued throughout the day. About noontime General Grant, who had visited all the corps commanders to
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 6
isen and walked to the left, where he leans over General Meade's shoulder and consults his map. In front of thethe 31st General Sheridan reached Cold Harbor, which Meade had ordered him to hold at all hazards. This place,ouse Landing, on the Pamunkey River. Both Lee and Meade had received reenforcements — the Ready for the a Corps of the Army of the James to the assistance of Meade, since Butler could defend his position perfectly wed passed the greater part of the fighting was over. Meade, at headquarters, was quickly made aware that each c Each corps commander reported and complained to General Meade that the other corps commanders, right or left, . Not yet understanding the real state of affairs Meade continued to issue orders to advance. To do so was gained. General Smith received a verbal order from Meade to make another assault, and he flatly refused to ob, that began the final investment of that city. Meade issued orders for the suspension of all further offe
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