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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Water transportation was used by General McClellan to good advantage in beginning the Peninsula campaign; after that, the Army of the Potomac, once having made the acquaintance of Virginia mud, retained it to the end. The wagon roads of the Old Dominion were tested in all seasons and by every known form of conveyance. A familiar accompaniment of the marching troops was the inevitable wagon train, carrying subsistence, ammunition, and clothing. Twelve wagons to every thousand men had been Napoleon's rule on the march, but the highways of Europe undoubtedly permitted relatively heavier loads. For the Army of the Potomac, twenty-five wagons per thousand men was not considered an excessive allowance. No wonder these well-laden supply trains aroused the interest of daring bands of Confederate scouts! Such prizes were well worth trying for. When General Meade, with his army of one hundred and fifty thousand men, left Brandy Station, Virginia, in May, 1864, on his march to Petersburg
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
over that at Richmond, for the Confederate authorities were served by transportation lines that were even less efficient than those of the North, and, moreover, a large proportion of their tillable land was devoted to cotton growing, and the home-grown food products of the South were unequal to the demands of home consumption. In January, 1862, the Confederate quartermaster- Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi At Belle Plain, at Centerville, Virginia, and at Baton Rouge appear the omnipresent army wagons, which followed the armies from Washington to the Gulf. The dimensions of the box of these useful vehicles were as follows: Length (inside), 120 inches; width (inside), 43 inches; height, 22 inches. Such a wagon could carry a load weighing about 2536 pounds, or 1500 rations of hard bread, coffee, sugar, and salt. Each wagon was drawn by a team of four horses or six mules. Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi Federal army wago
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
l volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the new soldiers This regiment was organized at Bangor, Me., for three months service, and left the State for Willett's Point, N. Y., May 14, 1861. Such was the enthusiasm of the moment that it was mustered into the United States service, part for two and part for three years, May 28, 1861. It moved to Washington on May 30th. The first Camp of the regiment was on Meridian till, near Washington, till July 1st. The live-long days were spent in constant drill, drill, drill during this period. McClellan was fashioning the new levies into an army. The total population of the Northern States in 1860 was 21,184,305. New England's population was 3,135,283, or about one-seventh of the whole. New England's troops numbered 363,162, over one-tenth of its population, practically one-seventh the total muster of forces raised in the North during the war, namely, 2,778,
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
h of its population, practically one-seventh the total muster of forces raised in the North during the war, namely, 2,778,304. The New England population was distributed as follows: Maine, 628,279; Massachusetts, 1,231,066; Vermont, 315,098; New Hampshire, 326,073; Connecticut, 460,147, and Rhode Island, 174,620. The number of troops that these States respectively furnished and the losses they incurred were: Maine, 70,107—loss, 9,398; Massachusetts, 146,730—loss, 13,942; Vermont, 33,288—loss, 5,224; New Hampshire, 33,937—loss, 4,882; Connecticut, 55,864—loss, 5,354; and Rhode Island, 23,236— loss, 1,321. The total loss was thus 40,121. Maine's contribution of more than 11 per cent. of its population took the form of two regiments of cavalry, one regiment of heavy artillery, seven batteries of light artillery, one battalion and a company of sharpshooters, with thirty-three regiments, one battalion, and seven companies of infantry. The Second Maine fought with the Army of the
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
w England population was distributed as follows: Maine, 628,279; Massachusetts, 1,231,066; Vermont, 315,098; New Hampshire, 326,073; Connecticut, 460,147, and Rhode Island, 174,620. The number of troops that these States respectively furnished and the losses they incurred were: Maine, 70,107—loss, 9,398; Massachusetts, 146,730—loss, 13,942; Vermont, 33,288—loss, 5,224; New Hampshire, 33,937—loss, 4,882; Connecticut, 55,864—loss, 5,354; and Rhode Island, 23,236— loss, 1,321. The total loss was thus 40,121. Maine's contribution of more than 11 per cent. of its population took the form of two regiments of cavalry, one regiment of heavy artillery, seven batnel Ambrose E. Burnside sits in the center, with folded arms in front of the tree. Above his head to the right is the rude sign: Welcome home. The little State of Rhode Island contributed three regiments and a battalion of cavalry, three regiments of heavy artillery, ten batteries of light artillery, twelve regiments of infa
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ng. Twelve wagons to every thousand men had been Napoleon's rule on the march, but the highways of Europe undoubtedly permitted relatively heavier loads. For the Army of the Potomac, twenty-five wagons per thousand men was not considered an excessive allowance. No wonder these well-laden supply trains aroused the interest of daring bands of Confederate scouts! Such prizes were well worth trying for. When General Meade, with his army of one hundred and fifty thousand men, left Brandy Station, Virginia, in May, 1864, on his march to Petersburg, each soldier carried six days rations of hardtack, coffee, sugar, and salt. The supply trains carried ten days rations of the same articles, and one day's ration of salt pork. For the remainder of the meat ration, a supply of beef cattle on the hoof for thirteen days rations was driven along with the troops, but over separate roads. General Thomas Wilson, who was Meade's chief commissary, directed the movements of this great herd of beef
Louisville (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ains at Belle plain landing among the special objects of his hatred the dishonest army contractor. After the work of the Quartermaster's Department had been systematized and some effort had been made to analyze costs, it appeared that the expense incurred for each soldier's equipment, exclusive of arms, amounted to fifty dollars. For the purchase and manufacture of clothing for the Federal army, it was necessary to maintain great depots in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, Louisville, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Detroit, and Springfield, Illinois. Confederate depots for similar purposes were established at Richmond, New Orleans, Memphis, Charleston, Savannah, San Antonio, and Fort Smith. The Confederacy was obliged to import most of its shoes and many articles of clothing. Wool was brought from Texas and Mexico to mills in the service of the Confederate Quartermaster's Department. Harness, tents, and Camp and garrison equipage were manufactured for the department in V
Belle Plain (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Federal army wagons from the Potomac to the Mississippi At Belle Plain, at Centerville, Virginia, and at Baton Rouge appear the omnipre war secretary, who numbered Provisioning Burnside's army—Belle plain landing on the Potomac Provisioning Burnside's army—Belle plaiBelle plain landing on the Potomac Closer view of Belle plain landing, late in November, 1862 Closer view of Belle plain landing, late in NovemberBelle plain landing, late in November, 1862 Closer view of Belle plain landing, late in November, 1862 Nearer still—arrival of the wagon-trains at Belle plain landing Nearer still—arrival of the wagon-trains at Belle plain landing Belle plain landing, late in November, 1862 Nearer still—arrival of the wagon-trains at Belle plain landing Nearer still—arrival of the wagon-trains at Belle plain landing among the special objects of his hatred the dishonest army contractor. After the work of the Quartermaster's Department had been systematiBelle plain landing Nearer still—arrival of the wagon-trains at Belle plain landing among the special objects of his hatred the dishonest army contractor. After the work of the Quartermaster's Department had been systematized and some effort had been made to analyze costs, it appeared that the expense incurred for each soldier's equipment, exclusive of arms, amBelle plain landing among the special objects of his hatred the dishonest army contractor. After the work of the Quartermaster's Department had been systematized and some effort had been made to analyze costs, it appeared that the expense incurred for each soldier's equipment, exclusive of arms, amounted to fifty dollars. For the purchase and manufacture of clothing for the Federal army, it was necessary to maintain great depo
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
plain landing among the special objects of his hatred the dishonest army contractor. After the work of the Quartermaster's Department had been systematized and some effort had been made to analyze costs, it appeared that the expense incurred for each soldier's equipment, exclusive of arms, amounted to fifty dollars. For the purchase and manufacture of clothing for the Federal army, it was necessary to maintain great depots in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, Louisville, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Detroit, and Springfield, Illinois. Confederate depots for similar purposes were established at Richmond, New Orleans, Memphis, Charleston, Savannah, San Antonio, and Fort Smith. The Confederacy was obliged to import most of its shoes and many articles of clothing. Wool was brought from Texas and Mexico to mills in the service of the Confederate Quartermaster's Department. Harness, tents, and Camp and garrison equipage were manufactured for the department in Virginia, Geor
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
rticles. The inflated currency and soaring prices made such action imperative, in the judgment of the Davis cabinet. The blockade did not wholly cut off the importation of supplies from abroad. Indeed, considerable quantities were bought in England by the Confederate Subsistence Department and paid for in cotton. Early in the war the South found that its meat supply was short, and the Richmond Government went into the pork-packing business on a rather extensive scale in Tennessee. The Se Confederate Quartermaster's Department. Harness, tents, and Camp and garrison equipage were manufactured for the department in Virginia, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, and Mississippi. The department's estimate to cover contracts made in England for supplies to run the blockade during a single six-months' period amounted to £ 570,000. It is the conclusion of James Ford Rhodes, the historian of the Civil War period, that never had an army been so well equipped will food and clothing a
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