hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. J. Hardee 426 0 Browse Search
Cleburne 334 18 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 301 1 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 278 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 267 1 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 182 2 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 175 31 Browse Search
J. Longstreet 148 0 Browse Search
William J. Hardee 145 1 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 143 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 146 total hits in 44 results.

1 2 3 4 5
by the enemy. Colonel Venable, in this splendid address on The campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg, also gives a vivid description of the scene with Harris' brigade; but as it is substantially the same as the account given in his letter to General Harris, quoted above, we will not reproduce it here. He concludes as follows: The homely simplicity of General Lee in these scenes of the 6th and 12th of May, is in striking contrast with the theatrical tone of the famous order of Napoleon at Austerlitz, in which he said: Soldiers, I will keep myself at a distance from the fire, if with your accustomed valor you carry disorder and confusion into the enemy's ranks; but it victory appear uncertain, you will see your Emperor expose himself in the front of battle. It is the contrast of the simple devotion to duty of the Christian patriot, thoughtless of self, fighting for all that men held dear, with the selfish spirit of the soldier of fortune, himself the only god of his idola
B. S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 3.21
Army of Northern Virginia Association: The scene in the Wilderness. General Lee soon sent a message to Longstreet to make a night march and bring up his two divisions at daybreak on the 6th. He himself slept on the field, taking his headquarters a few hundred yards from the line of battle of the day. It was his intention to relieve Hill's two divisions with Longstreet's, and throw them farther to the left, to fill up a part of the great unoccupied interval between the Plank road and Ewell's right, near the Old turnpike, or use them on his right, as the occasion might demand. It was unfortunate that any of these troops should have become aware they were to be relieved by Longstreet. It is certain that owing to this impression, Wilcox's division, on the right, was not in condition to receive Hancock's attack at early dawn on the morning of the 6th, by which they were driven back in considerable confusion. In fact some of the brigades of Wilcox's division came back in disorde
J. L. Gordon (search for this): chapter 3.21
k a grave injustice. I have no doubt if General Gordon's attention was called to this publicationront on the afternoon of the 10th of May, when Gordon and others urged General Lee to retire from thf the 13th to the rifle pits constructed under Gordon's supervision, while the battle was raging a spotsylvania Courthouse on the 12th of May with Gordon's division; and on the same morning with Harriosition of the night before. The scene with Gordon's division. Gordon soon arranged the left oGordon soon arranged the left of his division to make an effort to recapture the lines by driving the enemy back with his right. Age, the scene of the 6th of May was repeated. Gordon pointed to his Georgians and Virginians, who hepting their promise to drive the enemy back. Gordon, carrying the colors, led them forward in a heident ever occurred, replied briefly, Yes; General Gordon was the General --alluding thus concisely ent of the early morning of the 12th, when General Gordon led the charge, passing over the similar o[2 more...]
Charles S. Venable (search for this): chapter 3.21
authenticated : Letter from General N. H. Harris.Vicksburg, August 24th, 1871. Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.: Dear Sir — I am about to trespass upealth and prosperity, I am, Colonel, truly your friend, N. H. Harris. Letter from Colonel C. S. Venable.University of Virginia, November 24th, 1871. To General N. H. Harris: My Dear Generalhe Mississippians into battle at Spotsylvania. I am, General, very truly, your friend, Charles S. Venable. It may be well to add that there is really no conflict in the several accounts we ha Harris' Mississippi brigade. As completing his account of the three incidents, we quote Colonel Venable's description of the scene in the Wilderness, and with Gordon's division, as given in his adisputed ground between our troops and the portion of the line still held by the enemy. Colonel Venable, in this splendid address on The campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg, also gives a v
Emily V. Mason (search for this): chapter 3.21
tian patriot, thoughtless of self, fighting for all that men held dear, with the selfish spirit of the soldier of fortune, himself the only god of his idolatry. I have been thus particular in giving this incident, because it has been by various writers of the life of Lee confounded with the other two incidents of a like character which I have before given. In fact, to our great Commander, so low in his opinion of himself and so sublime in all his actions, these were matters of small moment; and when written to by a friend in Maryland (Judge Mason), after the war, as to whether such an incident ever occurred, replied briefly, Yes; General Gordon was the General --alluding thus concisely to the incident of the early morning of the 12th, when General Gordon led the charge, passing over the similar occurrences entirely, in his characteristic manner of never speaking of himself when he could help it. But that which was a small matter to him was a great one to the men whom he thus led.
S. D. Ramseur (search for this): chapter 3.21
and perhaps some made a motion to seize his bridle. He then said, If you will promise me to drive those people from our works, I will go back! The men shouted their promise with a will. General Lee then gave me orders to guide the brigade to General Rodes. We found General Rodes near the famous spring within a few rods of the line of battle held by our exhausted troops. As the column of Mississippians came up at a double-quick, an aid-de-camp came to General Rodes with a message from Ramseur that he could hold out only a few minutes longer unless assistance was at hand. Your brigade was thrown instantly into the fight, the column being formed into line under a tremendous fire and on very difficult ground. Never did a brigade go into fiercer battle under greater trials; never did a brigade do its duty more nobly. The entire salient was not recaptured, but the progress of the enemy was checked, and they were driven into a narrow space in the angle which they had occupied.
Walter H. Taylor (search for this): chapter 3.21
division came back in disorder, but sullenly and without panic, entirely across the Plank road, where General Lee and the gallant Hill in person helped to rally them. The assertion, made by several writers, that Hill's troops were driven back a mile and a half, is a most serious mistake. The right of his line was thrown back several hundred yards, but a portion of the troops still maintained their position. The danger, however, was great, and General Lee sent his trusted Adjutant, Colonel W. H. Taylor, back to Parker's store, to get the trains ready for a movement to the rear. He sent an aid also to hasten the march of Longstreet's divisions. These came the last mile and a half at a double-quick, in parallel columns, along the Plank road. General Longstreet rode forward with that imperturable coolness which always characterized him in times of perilous action, and began to put them in position on the right and left of the road. His men came to the front of disordered battle with
N. H. Harris (search for this): chapter 3.21
don's division at Spotsylvania) well authenticated : Letter from General N. H. Harris.Vicksburg, August 24th, 1871. Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of wishes for your health and prosperity, I am, Colonel, truly your friend, N. H. Harris. Letter from Colonel C. S. Venable.University of Virginia, November 24th, 1871. To General N. H. Harris: My Dear General — Your letter of August 24th was duly received. I sought a copy of Major Cooke's life of General Lee and read therthouse on the 12th of May with Gordon's division; and on the same morning with Harris' Mississippi brigade. As completing his account of the three incidents, we q the Wilderness to Petersburg, also gives a vivid description of the scene with Harris' brigade; but as it is substantially the same as the account given in his letter to General Harris, quoted above, we will not reproduce it here. He concludes as follows: The homely simplicity of General Lee in these scenes of the 6th and 12
Winfield Hancock (search for this): chapter 3.21
s his intention to relieve Hill's two divisions with Longstreet's, and throw them farther to the left, to fill up a part of the great unoccupied interval between the Plank road and Ewell's right, near the Old turnpike, or use them on his right, as the occasion might demand. It was unfortunate that any of these troops should have become aware they were to be relieved by Longstreet. It is certain that owing to this impression, Wilcox's division, on the right, was not in condition to receive Hancock's attack at early dawn on the morning of the 6th, by which they were driven back in considerable confusion. In fact some of the brigades of Wilcox's division came back in disorder, but sullenly and without panic, entirely across the Plank road, where General Lee and the gallant Hill in person helped to rally them. The assertion, made by several writers, that Hill's troops were driven back a mile and a half, is a most serious mistake. The right of his line was thrown back several hundred
D. A. Parker (search for this): chapter 3.21
disorder, but sullenly and without panic, entirely across the Plank road, where General Lee and the gallant Hill in person helped to rally them. The assertion, made by several writers, that Hill's troops were driven back a mile and a half, is a most serious mistake. The right of his line was thrown back several hundred yards, but a portion of the troops still maintained their position. The danger, however, was great, and General Lee sent his trusted Adjutant, Colonel W. H. Taylor, back to Parker's store, to get the trains ready for a movement to the rear. He sent an aid also to hasten the march of Longstreet's divisions. These came the last mile and a half at a double-quick, in parallel columns, along the Plank road. General Longstreet rode forward with that imperturable coolness which always characterized him in times of perilous action, and began to put them in position on the right and left of the road. His men came to the front of disordered battle with a steadiness unexample
1 2 3 4 5