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Cheraw (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
ages were perpetrated upon the persons of the inhabitants; the implements of agriculture were broken; dwellings, barns, mills and ginhouses were consumed; provisions of every description appropriated or destroyed; horses and mules carried away, and sheep, cattle and hogs were either taken for actual use or shot down and left behind. The like devastation marked the progress of the invading army from Columbia through this State to its northern frontier, and the towns of Winnsboroa, Camden and Cheraw suffered from like visitation by fire. If a single town or village or hamlet within their line of march escaped altogether the torch of the invaders, the committee have not been informed of the exception. The line of General Sherman's march, from his entering the territory of the State up to Columbia, and from Columbia to the North Carolina border, was one continuous track of fire. The devastation and ruin thus inflicted were but the execution of the policy and plan of General Sherman for
McPhersonville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
l not answer for the consequences where the army passes. The threats uttered in Georgia were sternly executed by the troops of General Sherman upon their entrance into this State. For eighty miles along the route of his army, through the most highly improved and cultivated region of the State, according to the testimony of intelligent and respectable witnesses, the habitations of but two white persons remained. As he advanced, the villages of Hardeeville, Grahamville, Gillisonville, McPhersonville, Barnwell, Blackville, Midway, Orangeburg and Lexington were successively devoted to the flames; indignities and outrages were perpetrated upon the persons of the inhabitants; the implements of agriculture were broken; dwellings, barns, mills and ginhouses were consumed; provisions of every description appropriated or destroyed; horses and mules carried away, and sheep, cattle and hogs were either taken for actual use or shot down and left behind. The like devastation marked the progres
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
eir line of march escaped altogether the torch of the invaders, the committee have not been informed of the exception. The line of General Sherman's march, from his entering the territory of the State up to Columbia, and from Columbia to the North Carolina border, was one continuous track of fire. The devastation and ruin thus inflicted were but the execution of the policy and plan of General Sherman for the subjugation of the Confederate States. Extracts from his address at Salem, Illinois, not to burn the cotton, as the Yankees had destroyed the railroad, and directed me to issue an order that no cotton should be fired. This I did at once, and the same order was extended to the cavalry throughout their march through South and North Carolina. The general officer commanding the division forming the rear guard of the Confederate cavalry (General M. C. Butler) deposes: That he was personally present with the rear squadron of his division; that Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton withdr
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
matters of such notoriety as, in the judgment of the committee, to dispense with the necessity of formal proof. The forces of General Sherman's command while in Georgia seem to have anticipated that their next march would be through South Carolina. Their temper and feeling toward our people, a witness, Mrs. L. Catherine Joyner, eth corps. Such expressions as the following were of hourly occurrence: Carolina may well fear us; she brought this war on, and shall pay the penalty. You think Georgia has suffered; just wait until we get into Carolina; every man, woman and child may dread us there. Of General Sherman himself the same witness informs us that, lady of his acquaintance, he said to her: Go off the line of railroad, for I will not answer for the consequences where the army passes. The threats uttered in Georgia were sternly executed by the troops of General Sherman upon their entrance into this State. For eighty miles along the route of his army, through the most highly
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
our people, a witness, Mrs. L. Catherine Joyner, thus describes: The soldiers were universal in their threats. They seemed to gloat over the distress that would result from their march through the State. I conversed with numbers of all grades belonging to the Fourteenth and Twentieth corps. Such expressions as the following were of hourly occurrence: Carolina may well fear us; she brought this war on, and shall pay the penalty. You think Georgia has suffered; just wait until we get into Carolina; every man, woman and child may dread us there. Of General Sherman himself the same witness informs us that, addressing himself to a lady of his acquaintance, he said to her: Go off the line of railroad, for I will not answer for the consequences where the army passes. The threats uttered in Georgia were sternly executed by the troops of General Sherman upon their entrance into this State. For eighty miles along the route of his army, through the most highly improved and cultivated re
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
by fire. If a single town or village or hamlet within their line of march escaped altogether the torch of the invaders, the committee have not been informed of the exception. The line of General Sherman's march, from his entering the territory of the State up to Columbia, and from Columbia to the North Carolina border, was one continuous track of fire. The devastation and ruin thus inflicted were but the execution of the policy and plan of General Sherman for the subjugation of the Confederate States. Extracts from his address at Salem, Illinois, have appeared in the public prints and thus he announces and vindicates the policy and plan referred to: We were strung out from Nashville clear down to Atlanta. Had I then gone on, stringing out our forces, what danger would there not have been of their attacking the little head of the column and crushing it? Therefore, I resolved in a moment to stop the game of guarding their cities, and to destroy their cities. We were determined to
Congaree (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
witness, Mrs. Frances T. Caughman, the general officer in command of his cavalry forces, General Kilpatrick, said, in reference to Columbia: Sherman will lay it in ashes for them. It was the general impression among all the prisoners we captured, says a Confederate officer, Colonel J. P. Austin, of the Ninth Kentucky cavalry, that Columbia was to be destroyed. On the morning of the same day (February 16, 1865) some of the forces of General Sherman appeared on the western side of the Congaree river, and without a demand of surrender, or any previous notice of their purpose, began to shell the town, then filled. with women, children and aged persons, and continued to do so, at intervals, throughout the day. The Confederate forces were withdrawn and the town restored to the control of the municipal authorities on the morning of the 17th of February. Accompanied by three of the aldermen, the Mayor, between 8 and 9 o'clock A. M., proceeded in the direction of Broad river, for the pur
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
neral Sherman's march, from his entering the territory of the State up to Columbia, and from Columbia to the North Carolina border, was one continuous track of fire. The devastation and ruin thus inflicted were but the execution of the policy and plan of General Sherman for the subjugation of the Confederate States. Extracts from his address at Salem, Illinois, have appeared in the public prints and thus he announces and vindicates the policy and plan referred to: We were strung out from Nashville clear down to Atlanta. Had I then gone on, stringing out our forces, what danger would there not have been of their attacking the little head of the column and crushing it? Therefore, I resolved in a moment to stop the game of guarding their cities, and to destroy their cities. We were determined to produce results, and now what were those results? To make every man, woman and child in the South feel that if they dared to rebel against the flag of their country they must die or submit.
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
es and outrages were perpetrated upon the persons of the inhabitants; the implements of agriculture were broken; dwellings, barns, mills and ginhouses were consumed; provisions of every description appropriated or destroyed; horses and mules carried away, and sheep, cattle and hogs were either taken for actual use or shot down and left behind. The like devastation marked the progress of the invading army from Columbia through this State to its northern frontier, and the towns of Winnsboroa, Camden and Cheraw suffered from like visitation by fire. If a single town or village or hamlet within their line of march escaped altogether the torch of the invaders, the committee have not been informed of the exception. The line of General Sherman's march, from his entering the territory of the State up to Columbia, and from Columbia to the North Carolina border, was one continuous track of fire. The devastation and ruin thus inflicted were but the execution of the policy and plan of General
Orangeburg, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.41
army passes. The threats uttered in Georgia were sternly executed by the troops of General Sherman upon their entrance into this State. For eighty miles along the route of his army, through the most highly improved and cultivated region of the State, according to the testimony of intelligent and respectable witnesses, the habitations of but two white persons remained. As he advanced, the villages of Hardeeville, Grahamville, Gillisonville, McPhersonville, Barnwell, Blackville, Midway, Orangeburg and Lexington were successively devoted to the flames; indignities and outrages were perpetrated upon the persons of the inhabitants; the implements of agriculture were broken; dwellings, barns, mills and ginhouses were consumed; provisions of every description appropriated or destroyed; horses and mules carried away, and sheep, cattle and hogs were either taken for actual use or shot down and left behind. The like devastation marked the progress of the invading army from Columbia through
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