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Herring Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
st of these columns had arrived at its destination on the James River, Harrison's Landing,— a peninsula about four miles long by one and a half wide, formed by Herring Creek on the northeast, running for that distance nearly parallel to the James before emptying into it. At its head a small inlet from the river on the southwest left but a narrow front exposed to attack. But, across Herring Creek, an extensive plateau called Evelington Heights dominates the upper part of this peninsula so that, if held by artillery, the enemy would be forced to attack at a disadvantage — the creek being impassable for some distance above. During Wednesday night, Stuart rean attack. A favorable opportunity was presented to regain the Evelington Heights by main force. They were occupied by but one division, and, being across Herring Creek from the rest of the Federal army, it could not have been rapidly reenforced. There would have been very small risk in making the effort so earnestly urged by
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e came upon his whole army, now united and massed, upon Malvern Hill. This position is a high plateau stretching north fro allusion to it. I gave him Mr. Allen's description of Malvern Hill and presumed to say, If Gen. McClellan is there in forevery battle, beginning with Mechanicsville. Including Malvern Hill, he had 60 casualties out of 80 men, and was only able ng on the left flank that morning, he would have turned Malvern Hill by his left, and taken position commanding the road som Ascensions were made daily, and when the enemy reached Malvern Hill, the inflated balloon would be carried down the river aboat — the Teaser, a small armed tug —got aground below Malvern Hill on a falling tide, and a large Federal gunboat, the Maresome precautions in efforts to conceal our marches. Malvern Hill to Westover As affording a bird's-eye view of our oESMERCHANICSVILLEGAINES MILLSAVAGE STATIONFRAZIER'S FARMMalvern HillOTHER AFFAIRSTOTALS Whiting's Div.210171751192 Jackson
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
s follows: — Gen. Lee expects you to advance rapidly. He says it is reported the enemy is getting off. Press forward your whole line and follow up Armistead's success. Under Magruder's orders the advance was' commenced by Wright's Ga. and La. brigade, followed by Mahone's Va. brigade, both of Huger's division. These two brigades formed our extreme right, and went into action only about 2500 strong, many stragglers having been lost from the ranks in the marchings and skirmishes of the ht's report gives a clear idea of the fighting upon our right flank. Next, on the left, Semmes and Kershaw also made, perhaps, the farthest advance of the attack, actually getting among the enemy's guns, where lay the body of a handsome young Louisiana officer, next morning, the farthest jetsam of the red wave which had stained all the green fields of our advance. Both of these brigades had been forced to fall back, not so much from the fire of the enemy in their front, as from that of their
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d massed, upon Malvern Hill. This position is a high plateau stretching north from the lowlands along the valley of James River, over which it dominates in high steep hills, with Turkey Run on the west, and Western Run on the east. It is about as columns wherever opportunity offered. About 5 P. M. the last of these columns had arrived at its destination on the James River, Harrison's Landing,— a peninsula about four miles long by one and a half wide, formed by Herring Creek on the northeaision. For a week after McClellan had established himself at Westover, he neglected to occupy the opposite bank of the James. As the fire of his gunboats commanded it, he could do so at pleasure, but as long as he did not, it was much better forxt day the Federals established themselves on the South Side. The strategic advantages of a position astraddle of the James River have already been referred to (page 61, Chap. III.), but they were not yet generally appreciated. Fortunately for us
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
g was on the left with three brigades (one of Jackson's under Hampton, and two of his own). D. H. Hnd Ewell's and Jackson's own division, behind Jackson. The enemy's batteries kept up a severe fireLongstreet were close in rear, and Whiting's, Jackson's, and Ewell's divisions were on the left, an's field. Including with these the losses in Jackson's and Ewell's divisions and Lawton's brigade,of different battles are not separated. Of Jackson's part in this action there is very little tome up at the same time by the direct road. Jackson's official report says: — On the morning he candle, and it should have been played. Jackson's troops, however, were in front, and Jacksons Longstreet consented, and when Lee arrived, Jackson's arguments prevailed and the attack was give Lee, and he must have reluctantly yielded to Jackson's persuasion. Evidently, Jackson was still nER AFFAIRSTOTALS Whiting's Div.210171751192 Jackson's Div.391117208 Lawton's Brig.149275567 Ewe[2 more...]
Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
em the repose of which they stood so much in need. One episode of the pursuit, however, is worthy of note. On July 2, but little progress was made by the infantry, owing to the heavy rain-storm, but Stuart's cavalry (which had recrossed the Chickahominy by fording at Forge Bridge on the afternoon of July 1) followed the enemy and endeavored to shell his columns wherever opportunity offered. About 5 P. M. the last of these columns had arrived at its destination on the James River, Harrison's Landing,— a peninsula about four miles long by one and a half wide, formed by Herring Creek on the northeast, running for that distance nearly parallel to the James before emptying into it. At its head a small inlet from the river on the southwest left but a narrow front exposed to attack. But, across Herring Creek, an extensive plateau called Evelington Heights dominates the upper part of this peninsula so that, if held by artillery, the enemy would be forced to attack at a disadvantage —
Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
r pressed forward in columns of infantry, first on one, then on the other, or on both. As if moved by a reckless disregard of life equal to that displayed at Gaines Mill, with a determination to capture our army or destroy it by driving us into the river, brigade after brigade rushed at our batteries; but the artillery of both had been so little exposed as to have had together but two killed and 26 wounded, in the whole campaign. His 3d brigade, Winder's, had had but 75 casualties at Gaines Mill, and 104 at Malvern. Lawton's brigade, and Ewell's and Whiting's divisions, had only been severely engaged at Gaines Mill. Longstreet, with A. P. Hill's andGaines Mill. Longstreet, with A. P. Hill's and his own divisions, was on the 2d moved around the field of battle to Poindexter's house, and on the 3d was sent by roads to the left of Jackson. By mistake of the guides he was conducted too far to the left, and only reached Evelington Heights about dark on the 3d; Jackson's troops came up at the same time by the direct road.
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ovement inaugurated that day, a force might easily have reached the high ground known as Evelington Heights, overlooking Westover (of which there will be more to tell later), or any nearer point threatening the enemy's line of retreat, where a Confedut the day greatly retarded our progress. The enemy, harassed and followed closely by the cavalry, succeeded in gaining Westover and the protection of his gunboats. He immediately began to fortify his position, which was one of great natural strenguskets. We lost two guns in the stampede in Holmes's division. For a week after McClellan had established himself at Westover, he neglected to occupy the opposite bank of the James. As the fire of his gunboats commanded it, he could do so at pleloons of the enemy forced upon us constant troublesome precautions in efforts to conceal our marches. Malvern Hill to Westover As affording a bird's-eye view of our organization and of the forces engaged in the different actions, and the sever
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly forward and gained considerable ground, but was forced back. The gallant and accomplished Meares, 3d N. C., Ripley's brigade, had fallen at the head of his regiment, and that brigade was streaming to the rear. Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades had also fallen back. Ransom's brigade had come up to my support from Gen. Huger. It moved too far to the left and became mixed up with a mass of troops near the parsonage on the Quaker road, suffering much and effecting little. Gen. Winder was sent up by Gen. Jackson, but he came too late, and also went to the same belt of woods near the parsonage, already overcrowded with troops. Finally Gen. Ewell came up, but it was after dark, and nothing could be accomplished. I advised him to hold the ground he had gained and not to attempt a forward movement. Gen. Toombs's account of the advance of his brigade will give some idea of the confusion of commands upon the field af
ruder's, and two more of Huger's, including Ransom's, detached from Holmes's division. The remainder of Holmes's was held on the River road, Holmes's was held on the River road, and was not engaged. Longstreet and Hill were in reserve behind Magruder; and Ewell's and Jackson's own division, behind Jackson. The enemy'were all the rest of Magruder's and Huger's 10 brigades, Ransom, of Holmes's division, being also temporarily attached to Huger. Farther to teries, to which he assented; and this command, under Cols. Butt and Holmes, accompanied by Capt. Du Bose and Maj. Alexander (my quartermaster,d Whiting's, Jackson's, and Ewell's divisions were on the left, and Holmes a few miles off on the right. The enemy, moreover, having sent aheguns and about 35,000 muskets. We lost two guns in the stampede in Holmes's division. For a week after McClellan had established himself a54438 Huger's Div.311373941531 A. P. Hill's Div.6764268875084210 Holmes's Div.3499178677 Pendleton's Art.22 Stuart's Cav.7171 Totals 10
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