hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 50 total hits in 18 results.

1 2
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
te. Soon afterwards Representative Anson Burlingame (q. v.), of Massachusetts, challenged Mr. Brooks to fight a duel in consequence of words used in a debate in the House, but Mr. Brooks failed to appear at the designated time and place in Canada. After the assault Mr. Brooks resigned his seat in the House, but his constituents immediately re-elected him, and he was presented with numerous tokens of esteem by friends in different parts of the South. His defence of the assault. On July 14. 1856,. Mr. Brooks, in resigning his seat in Congress. delivered the following speech: Mr. Speaker,--Some time since a Senator from Massachusetts allowed himself, in an elaborately prepared speech, to offer a gross insult to my State, and to a venerable friend, who is my State representative, and who was absent at the time. Not content with that, he published to the world, and circulated extensively, this uncalled — for libel on my State and my blood. Whatever insults my State insults
January 27th, 1857 AD (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the reso
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
1 2