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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
le set up for themselves in political and social life, there was no exact enumeration of the inhabitants; but from a careful examination of official records, Mr. Bancroft estimated the number as follows: Colonies.White.Colored. Massachusetts 207,0003 000 New Hampshire50,000 Connecticut 133,0003,500 Rhode Island 35,0004,500 New York85,00011,000 New Jersey73,0005,000 Pennsylvania and Delaware195,00011,000 Maryland104,00044,000 Virginia168,000116,000 North Carolina70,00020,000 South Carolina40,00040,000 Georgia5,0002,000 —————— Total1,165,000 260,000 At this period the extent of the territorial possessions of England and France in America was well defined on maps published by Evans and Mitchell—that of the latter (a new edition) in 1754. The British North American colonies stretched coastwise along the Atlantic about 1,000 miles, but inland their extent was very limited. New France, as the French settlers called their claimed territory in America, extended ove
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
th of New Hampshire (q. v.). King James of England persecuted the Roman Catholics in his dominios named Carolina, in honor of Charles II., of England. In 1668 the foundations of the commonwealthg the condition of the prisoners for debt, in England, conceived the idea of founding a colony in Ary; or sufficient provisions to carry them to England, or to give them a passage home in his fleet.rnment resent it. Though the revolution in England (1688) found its warmest friends among the Los. As early as 1696 a pamphlet appeared in England recommending Parliament to tax the English-Amand the establishment of courts of admiralty, England at length acquired a judicial control over th the extent of the territorial possessions of England and France in America was well defined on maplitical equality with their fellowsubjects in England, and were ready to maintain their rights at ace of the world not subject to the King of Great Britain. This resolution was the broom that swept
they had begun to provide themselves with comforts, they were attacked by Samuel Argall (q. v.), of Virginia. The French made some resistance, but were compelled to surrender to superior numbers. One of the Jesuits was killed, several were wounded, and the remainder made prisoners. Argall took fifteen of the Frenchmen, besides the Jesuits, to Virginia; the remainder sailed for France. This success induced the governor of Virginia to send an expedition to crush the power of the French in Acadia, under the pretext that they were encroaching upon the rights of the English. Argall sailed with three ships for the purpose. On his arrival he broke in pieces, at St. Saviour, a cross which the Jesuits had set up, and raised another, on which he inscribed the name of King James. He sailed to St. Croix and destroyed the remains of De Mont's settlement there; and then he went to Port Royal and laid that deserted town in ashes. The English government did not approve the act, nor did the Fr
Drake, which they did. The whole colony sailed from Virginia June 18, 1586, and arrived at Portsmouth, England, July 28. Madame de Guercheville, a pious lady in France, zealous for the conversion of the American Indians, persuaded De Monts to surrender his patent, and then obtained a charter for all the lands of New France. She killed, several were wounded, and the remainder made prisoners. Argall took fifteen of the Frenchmen, besides the Jesuits, to Virginia; the remainder sailed for France. This success induced the governor of Virginia to send an expedition to crush the power of the French in Acadia, under the pretext that they were encroaching upo0020,000 South Carolina40,00040,000 Georgia5,0002,000 —————— Total1,165,000 260,000 At this period the extent of the territorial possessions of England and France in America was well defined on maps published by Evans and Mitchell—that of the latter (a new edition) in 1754. The British North American colonies stretc
Ashley River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
nglish landed on the shores of the James River. Some settlers went into North Carolina from Jamestown, between the years 1640 and 1650, and in 1663 a settlement in the northern part of North Carolina had an organized government, and the country was named Carolina, in honor of Charles II., of England. In 1668 the foundations of the commonwealth of State of North Carolina (q. v.) were laid at Edenton. In 1670 some people from Barbadoes sailed into the harbor of Charleston and settled on the Ashley and Cooper rivers (see State of South Carolina). The benevolent General Oglethorpe, commiserating the condition of the prisoners for debt, in England, conceived the idea of founding a colony in America with them. The government approved the project, and, in 1732, he landed, with emigrants, on the site of the city of Savannah, and there planted the germ of the commonwealth of Georgia (q. v.) The first English colony planted in America was the one sent over in 1585 by Sir Walter Raleigh, w
000 Indians were present, who were loaded with generous gifts. They complied with the wishes of the several agents present, and the western boundary-line was established at the mouth of the Kanawha to meet Stuart's line on the south. From the Kanawha northward it followed the Ohio and Alleghany rivers, a branch of the Susquehanna, and so on to the junction of Canada and Wood creeks, tributaries of the Mohawk River. Thus the Indian frontier was defined all the way from Florida almost to Lake Ontario; but Sir William Johnson (q. v.), pretending to recognize a right of the Six Nations to a larger part of Kentucky, caused the line to be continued down the Ohio to the mouth of the Tennessee River, which stream was made to constitute the western boundary of Virginia. In striking a balance of losses and gains in the matter of parliamentary taxation in America, it was found in 1772 that the expenses on account of the Stamp Act exceeded $60,000, while there had been received for revenue
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
Virginia June 18, 1586, and arrived at Portsmouth, England, July 28. Madame de Guercheville, a pious lady in France, zealous for the conversion of the American Indians, persuaded De Monts to surrender his patent, and then obtained a charter for all the lands of New France. She sent out missionaries in 1613. They sailed from Honfleur March 12, and arrived in Acadia (q. v.), where the arms of Madame Guercheville were set up in token of possession. Her agent proceeded to Port Royal (now Annapolis), where he found only five persons, two of whom were Jesuit missionaries previously sent over. The Jesuits went with other persons to Mount Desert Island. Just as they had begun to provide themselves with comforts, they were attacked by Samuel Argall (q. v.), of Virginia. The French made some resistance, but were compelled to surrender to superior numbers. One of the Jesuits was killed, several were wounded, and the remainder made prisoners. Argall took fifteen of the Frenchmen, besid
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
,000 Connecticut 133,0003,500 Rhode Island 35,0004,500 New York85,00011,000 New Jersey73,0005,000 Pennsylvania and Delaware195,00011,000 Maryland104,00044,000 Virginia168,000116,000 North Carolina70,00020,000 South Carolina40,00040,000 Georgia5,0002,000 —————— Total1,165,000 260,000 At this period the extent of the territorial possessions of England and France in America was well defined on maps published by Evans and Mitchell—that of the latter (a new edition) in 1754. The Brite colonial paper currency. The narrow-minded Hillsborough, British secretary of state for the colonies wishing, if possible, to blot out the settlements west of the Appalachian Mountains, and to extend an unbroken line of Indian frontier from Georgia to Canada, had issued repeated instructions to that effect, in order to make an impassable obstruction of emigration westward. These instructions were renewed with emphasis in 1768, when John Stuart, an agent faithful to his trust, had a
Amsterdam (Netherlands) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
the settlement flourished, and, in 1619, the first representative Assembly in Virginia was held at Jamestown. Then were laid the foundations of the State of Virginia (q. v.). Manhattan Island (now the borough of Manhattan, city of New York) was discovered by Henry Hudson in 1609, while employed by the Dutch East India Company. Dutch traders were soon afterwards seated there and on the site of Albany, 150 miles up the Hudson River. The government of Holland granted exclusive privilege to Amsterdam merchants to traffic with the Indians on the Hudson, and the country was called New Netherland. The Dutch West India Company was formed in 1621, with unrestricted control over New Netherland. They bought Manhattan Island of the Indians for about $24, paid chiefly in cheap trinkets, and in 1623 thirty families from Holland landed there and began a settlement. Then were laid the foundations of the State of New York, as New Netherland was called after it passed into the possession of the
Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
of Manhattan, city of New York) was discovered by Henry Hudson in 1609, while employed by the Dutch East India Company. Dutch traders were soon afterwards seated there and on the site of Albany, 150 miles up the Hudson River. The government of HoHolland granted exclusive privilege to Amsterdam merchants to traffic with the Indians on the Hudson, and the country was called New Netherland. The Dutch West India Company was formed in 1621, with unrestricted control over New Netherland. They boo the possession of the English. Late in 1620 a company of English Puritans (Puritans) who had fled from persecution to Holland, crossed the Atlantic and landed on the shores of Massachusetts, by permission of the Plymouth Company (see Plymouth Compring of 1634, and, at a place called St. Mary, they laid the foundations of the commonwealth of Maryland (Maryland). The Dutch navigator, Adriaen Block (q. v.), sailing east from Manhattan, explored a river some distance inland, which the Indians c
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