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Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
his inaugural address. In the evening President Davis held Jefferson Davis. a levee at Estelle Hall, and the city was brilliantly lighted up by bonfires and illuminations. President Davis chose for his constitutional advisers a cabinet comprising Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secretary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, of Alabama, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida, Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, of Texas, Postmaster-General. Afterwards, Judah P. Benjamin was made Attorney-General. Two days after President Lincoln's call for troops, President Davis issued a proclamation, in the preamble of which he said the President of the United States had announced the intention of invading the Confederacy with an armed force for the purpose of capturing its fortresses, and thereby subverting its independence, and subjecting the free people thereof to the dominion of a foreign power. He said it was t
America (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
d. It was in this disguise that he was captured. Such is the story as told by C. E. L. Stuart, of Davis's staff. The Confederate President was taken to fort Monroe by way of Savannah and the sea. Reagan, who was captured with Davis, and Alexander H. Stephens were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Inaugural Address>head> The following is the text of the inaugural address, delivered at Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 18, 1861: Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, Friends, and Fellow-Citizens,—Called to the difficult and responsible station of chief executive of the provisional government which you have instituted, I approach the discharge of the duties assigned me with an humble distrust of my abilities, but with a sustaining confidence in the wisdom of those who are to guide and aid me in the administration of public affairs, and an abiding faith in the virtue and patriotism of the people. Looking forward to the speedy establishment of a permanen
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
61, and was chosen provisional President of the Southern Confederacy in February. In November, 1861, he was elected permanent President for six years. Early in April, 1865, he and his associates in the government fled from Richmond, first to Danville, Va., and then towards the Gulf of Mexico. He was arrested in Georgia, taken to Fort Monroe, and confined on a charge of treason for about two years, when he was released on bail, Horace Greeley's name heading the list of bondsmen for $100,000. Hthe laws of the United States for the prevention and punishment of piracy. With this opposing proclamation the great Civil War was actively begun. In April, 1865, Mr. Davis's wife and children, and his wife's sister, had accompanied him from Danville to Washington, Ga., where, for prudential reasons, the father separated from the others. He soon learned that some Confederate soldiers, believing that the Jefferson Davis's home in Richmond. treasure that was carried away from Richmond was w
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
urged him to go to a spring near by, where his horse and arms were. He complied, as he was leaving the tentdoor, followed by a servant with a water-bucket, his sister-in-law flung a shawl over his head. It was in this disguise that he was captured. Such is the story as told by C. E. L. Stuart, of Davis's staff. The Confederate President was taken to fort Monroe by way of Savannah and the sea. Reagan, who was captured with Davis, and Alexander H. Stephens were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Inaugural Address>head> The following is the text of the inaugural address, delivered at Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 18, 1861: Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, Friends, and Fellow-Citizens,—Called to the difficult and responsible station of chief executive of the provisional government which you have instituted, I approach the discharge of the duties assigned me with an humble distrust of my abilities, but with a sustaining confidence in the wisdom
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
itol, followed by a multitude of State officials and citizens. The oath of office was administered to Davis by Howell Cobb, president of the Congress, at the close of his inaugural address. In the evening President Davis held Jefferson Davis. a levee at Estelle Hall, and the city was brilliantly lighted up by bonfires and illuminations. President Davis chose for his constitutional advisers a cabinet comprising Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secretary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, of Alabama, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida, Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, of Texas, Postmaster-General. Afterwards, Judah P. Benjamin was made Attorney-General. Two days after President Lincoln's call for troops, President Davis issued a proclamation, in the preamble of which he said the President of the United States had announced the intention of invading the Confederacy with an armed force for the purp
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
eracy; and also that if any person, under the pretended authority of such States, or under any other pretence, should molest a vessel of the United States, or the person or cargo on board of her, such person would be held amenable to the laws of the United States for the prevention and punishment of piracy. With this opposing proclamation the great Civil War was actively begun. In April, 1865, Mr. Davis's wife and children, and his wife's sister, had accompanied him from Danville to Washington, Ga., where, for prudential reasons, the father separated from the others. He soon learned that some Confederate soldiers, believing that the Jefferson Davis's home in Richmond. treasure that was carried away from Richmond was with Mrs. Davis, had formed a plot to seize all her trunks in search of it. He hastened to the rescue of his family and property, riding rapidly 18 miles. They were near Irwinsville, south of Macon, Ga. The tents were pitched at night, and the wearied ones retired
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
owell Cobb, president of the Congress, at the close of his inaugural address. In the evening President Davis held Jefferson Davis. a levee at Estelle Hall, and the city was brilliantly lighted up by bonfires and illuminations. President Davis chose for his constitutional advisers a cabinet comprising Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secretary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, of Alabama, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida, Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, of Texas, Postmaster-General. Afterwards, Judah P. Benjamin was made Attorney-General. Two days after President Lincoln's call for troops, President Davis issued a proclamation, in the preamble of which he said the President of the United States had announced the intention of invading the Confederacy with an armed force for the purpose of capturing its fortresses, and thereby subverting its independence, and subjecting the free people thereof
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
in February. In November, 1861, he was elected permanent President for six years. Early in April, 1865, he and his associates in the government fled from Richmond, first to Danville, Va., and then towards the Gulf of Mexico. He was arrested in Georgia, taken to Fort Monroe, and confined on a charge of treason for about two years, when he was released on bail, Horace Greeley's name heading the list of bondsmen for $100,000. He was never tried. He published The rise and fall of the Confederaten the evening President Davis held Jefferson Davis. a levee at Estelle Hall, and the city was brilliantly lighted up by bonfires and illuminations. President Davis chose for his constitutional advisers a cabinet comprising Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secretary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, of Alabama, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida, Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, of Texas, Postmaster-General.
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 Statesman; born in Christian county, Ky., June 3, 1808; graduated at West Point in 1828; served as lieutenant in the Black Hawk War (q. v.) in 1831-32, and resigned in 1835 to become a cotton-planter in Mississippi. He was a member of Congress in 1845-46, and served as colonel of a Mississippi regiment in the war with Mexico. He was United States Senator from 1847 to 1851, and from 1857 to 1861. He was called to the cabinet of President Pierce as Secretary of War in 1853, and remained four years. He resigned his seat in the Senate in January, 1861, and was chosen provisional President of the Southern Confederacy in February. In November, 1861, he was elected permanent President for six years. Early in April, 1865, he and his associates in the government fled from Richmond, first to Danville, Va., and then towards the Gulf of Mexico. He was arrested in Georgia, taken to Fort Monroe, and confined on a charge of treason for about two years, when he wa
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): entry davis-jefferson
Jefferson Davis's home in Richmond. treasure that was carried away from Richmond was with Mrs. Davis, had formed a plot to seize all her trunks in search of it. He hastened to the rescue of his family and property, riding rapidly 18 miles. They were near Irwinsville, south of Macon, Ga. The tents were pitched at night, and the wearied ones retired to rest, intending to resume their flight in the morning. General Wilson, at Macon, hearing of Davis's flight towards the Gulf, had sent out Michigan and Wisconsin cavalry, whose vigilance was quickened by the offered reward of $100,000 for the arrest of the fugitive. Simultaneously, from opposite points, these two parties approached the camp of Davis and his little party just at dawn, May 11, 1865. Mistaking each other for foes, they exchanged shots with such precision that two men were killed and several wounded before the error was discovered. The sleepers were aroused. The camp was surrounded, and Davis, while attempting to escap
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