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Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
h been much promoted and encouraged by the traitorous correspondence, counsels, and comfort of divers wicked and desperate persons within our realm, and he called upon all officers of the realm, civil and military, and all his subjects, to disclose all traitorous conspiracies, giving information of the same to one of the secretaries of state, in order to bring to condign punishment the authors, perpetrators, and abettors of such traitorous designs. This proclamation was aimed at Chatham and Camden in the House of Lords, and Barr6 in the House of Commons, and their active political friends. When it was read to the people at the Royal Exchange it was received with a general hiss from the populace. But the stubborn King would not yield. He would rather perish than consent to repeal the alterations in the charter of Massachusetts, or yield the absolute authority of Parliament. And North, who in his heart thought the King wrong, supported him chiefly, as was alleged, because he loved o
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
Windsor Castle, Jan. 29, 1820. There were members of the aristocracy that, through envy, hated Pitt, who, in spite of them, had been called to the highest offices in the kingdom. When young Princeeath of the King, he went to Carleton House, the residence of his mother, and sent for Newcastle, Pitt's political enemy. He and Lord Bute prevailed upon the young King to discard Pitt and favor theiPitt and favor their own schemes. Newcastle prepared the first speech from the throne of George III.; and when Pitt, as prime minister, went to him and presented the draft of an address to be pronounced at the meeting was politely informed that the speech was already prepared and the preliminaries were arranged. Pitt immediately perceived that the King's tutor and warm personal friend of the young King's mother, y a conspicuous place in the administration. George chose Bute for his counsellor and guide, and Pitt, to whom England, more than to any other man, owed its present power and glory, was allowed to re
lled to acknowledge the independence of his lost American colonies. Then he had continual quarrels with his ministry, and talked of leaving England and retiring to his little kingdom of Hanover, but refrained on being assured that it would be much easier for him to leave England than to return to it. Like his two royal predecessors, George hated his oldest son, the Prince of Wales, because he was generally in political opposition to him and led a loose life. After a serious dispute with Russia, which threatened to seize Turkey, and another George III. with Spain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the most arbitrary rule was exercised in England, driving the people at times to the verge of revolution. Ireland was goaded into rebellion, which was suppressed by the most cruel methods—equal in atrocity to any perpetrated by the French in La Vendee and Brittany. The union of Great Britain and Ireland was effected in 1800, the parliament of the latter ceasing to ex
ion for suppressing rebellion and sedition in America. There is reason, said the proclamation, to writer, prepared an appeal to the people of America in favor of independence. The British minipeople of Great Britain to the inhabitants of America, written by Sir John Dalrymple, at the requesrs to withdraw the British forces employed in America; and the Duke of Richmond, in the House of Lords, proposed a total change of measures in America and Ireland. In both Houses these sensible meas firm resolution to carry on the war against America, France, and Spain; and that, before he wouldsequently, no troops should be withdrawn from America, nor its independence ever be allowed. Stubbgreat a dismemberment of the empire, and that America may be far from those calamities which have fParliament concerning the cessation of war in America. He said they had lost the feelings of Englie said, I feel sensibly this dismemberment of America from the empire, and I should be miserable, i[1 more...]
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
George (William Frederick) 1737-1820 King of Great Britain; born in London, June 4, 1737; grandson of George II. His mind was narrow, his disposition was crafty and arbitrary, and during his long reign, while he was sane, his years were passed in continual combat against the growing liberal spirit of the age. Being a native of England (which his two royal predecessors were not), and young and moral, he was at first popular on his accession to the throne, Oct. 26, 1760. In his first speeKing ought to ride a hardtrotting horse without stirrups. Portions of that statue are now in possession of the New York Historical Society. Usual appearance of George II. about 1776. (from a sketch by Gear.) The arrival of Richard Penn in London with the second petition of Congress aroused the anger of the King towards, and his fixed determination concerning, the rebellious colonies. He refused to see Penn or receive the petition, and on Aug. 23 he issued a proclamation for suppressin
ied that it was not in his power to reverse the order of nature, and resigned. The pliant Sir Joseph Banks, with the practice of a true courtier, advocated the opinion patronized by his majesty, and was appointed president of the Royal Society. As before stated, King George was greatly disturbed by the action of Parliament concerning the cessation of war in America. He said they had lost the feelings of Englishmen; and he took to heart what he called the cruel usage of all the powers of Europe, who, excepting Spain, had expressed a desire for the freedom and independence of the United States. His ministry (North's) having resigned, he was compelled to accept a liberal one. Lord Shelbourne brought about the call of Lord Rockingham (whom the King disliked) to form a cabinet, and when his majesty finally yielded, he said, Necessity made me yield to the advice of Lord Shelbourne. And when, finally, he was compelled to acknowledge the independence of the United States, he said, I fee
him and led a loose life. After a serious dispute with Russia, which threatened to seize Turkey, and another George III. with Spain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the most arbitrary rule was exercised in England, driving the people at times to the verge of revolution. Ireland was goaded into rebellion, wtany. The union of Great Britain and Ireland was effected in 1800, the parliament of the latter ceasing to exist. Against the King's wishes, peace was made with France in 1802; but war was again begun the next year. Then came the struggle with Napoleon Bonaparte, which lasted until the overthrow of that ruler at Waterloo, Juneour in length, he expressed to them the dictates of his frequent and severe selfexamination. He declared his firm resolution to carry on the war against America, France, and Spain; and that, before he would hear of any man's readiness to come into office, he would expect to see it signed, under his own hand, that he was resolved
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
t parade, Aug. 21, 1770. Within six years afterwards the people pulled it down, with demonstrations of contempt. Washington occupied New York with Continental troops in the summer of 1776. There he received the Declaration of Independence (July 9), and it was read to the army. The same evening a large concourse of soldiers and civilians assembled at the Bowling Green, pulled down the statue, broke it in pieces, and sent a portion to the house of Oliver Wolcott, on the western edge of Connecticut, where it was run into bullets by his family. In a letter to General Gates upon this event, Ebenezer Hazard wrote: His [the King's] troops will probably have melted majesty fired at them. The venerable Zachariah Greene (q. v.) who was present at the pulling down of the statue, said the artist had made an omission of stirrups for the saddle of the horse, and it was a common remark of the soldiers, The King ought to ride a hardtrotting horse without stirrups. Portions of that statue are
Chatham (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
merica] hath been much promoted and encouraged by the traitorous correspondence, counsels, and comfort of divers wicked and desperate persons within our realm, and he called upon all officers of the realm, civil and military, and all his subjects, to disclose all traitorous conspiracies, giving information of the same to one of the secretaries of state, in order to bring to condign punishment the authors, perpetrators, and abettors of such traitorous designs. This proclamation was aimed at Chatham and Camden in the House of Lords, and Barr6 in the House of Commons, and their active political friends. When it was read to the people at the Royal Exchange it was received with a general hiss from the populace. But the stubborn King would not yield. He would rather perish than consent to repeal the alterations in the charter of Massachusetts, or yield the absolute authority of Parliament. And North, who in his heart thought the King wrong, supported him chiefly, as was alleged, becaus
United States (United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
end neither attention nor disposition shall be wanting on my part, he nevertheless detested everything American. The acknowledgment of the independence of the United States was wrung from him by dire necessity. Ever since the beginning of the troubles he had thoroughly hated Franklin personally, to whom, on account of his coolnes took to heart what he called the cruel usage of all the powers of Europe, who, excepting Spain, had expressed a desire for the freedom and independence of the United States. His ministry (North's) having resigned, he was compelled to accept a liberal one. Lord Shelbourne brought about the call of Lord Rockingham (whom the King difinally yielded, he said, Necessity made me yield to the advice of Lord Shelbourne. And when, finally, he was compelled to acknowledge the independence of the United States, he said, I feel sensibly this dismemberment of America from the empire, and I should be miserable, indeed, if I did not feel that no blame on that account can
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