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Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry hartford-conventions
for several years speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Joshua Thomas was judge of probate in Plymouth county, Mass., and was a man of unblemished reputation in public and private life. Joseph Lyman was a lawyer, and for several years held the office of sheriff of his county. George Bliss was an eminent lawyer, distinguished for his learning, industry, and integrity. He was several times a member of the Massachusetts legislature. Daniel Waldo was a resident of Worcester, where he established himself in early life as a merchant. He was a State Senator, but would seldom consent to an election to office. Samuel Sumner Wilde was a lawyer, and was raised to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. Hodijah Baylies was an officer in the Continental army, in which he served efficiently. He was for many years judge of probate in his county, and was distinguished for sound understanding, fine talents, and unimpeachable integrity. Step
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry hartford-conventions
erchant. He was a State Senator, but would seldom consent to an election to office. Samuel Sumner Wilde was a lawyer, and was raised to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. Hodijah Baylies was an officer in the Continental army, in which he served efficiently. He was for many years judge of probate in his county, and was distinguished for sound understanding, fine talents, and unimpeachable integrity. Stephen Longfellow, Jr., was a lawyer of eminence in Portland, Me., where he stood at the head of his profession. He was a Representative in Congress. Chauncey Goodrich was an eminent lawyer, and for many years a member of the legislature of Connecticut, in each of its branches. He was also a member of each House of Congress, and lieutenantgovernor of Connecticut. His reputation was very exalted as a pure statesman and useful citizen. John Treadwell was in public stations in Connecticut a greater part of his life, where he was a member of each
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry hartford-conventions
to Governor Strong, refused to pay the expenses of defending Massachusetts from the common foe. Similar action, for similar cause, had occe national government. A joint committee of the legislature of Massachusetts made a report on the state of public affairs, which contained athe convention. On that day twenty-six delegates, representing Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Vermont, assemblWhig in the days of the Revolution. He was a representative of Massachusetts in Congress during the Confederation, and was specially noticed and was raised to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. Hodijah Baylies was an officer in the Continental army, in f morals and love of country. Calvin Goddard was a native of Massachusetts, but studied and practised law in Connecticut, and became a di Federalists conveyed much reproach. At the next election in Massachusetts the Administration, or Democratic, party issued a handbill with
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry hartford-conventions
Hartford conventions. Two noteworthy conventions have been held in Hartford, Conn. The first was on Oct. 20, 1779, when the alarming depreciation of the Continental paper-money was producing great anxiety throughout the colonies. There were deHartford, Conn. The first was on Oct. 20, 1779, when the alarming depreciation of the Continental paper-money was producing great anxiety throughout the colonies. There were delegates from five of the Eastern States. They proposed a new regulation of prices, on the basis of $20 in paper for $1 in coin; and they advised a general convention at Philadelphia at the beginning of 1780, to adopt a scheme for all the colonies.deration of some amendments to the Constitution on the subject of slave representation. The proposition was acceded to. Hartford was the place, and Thursday, Dec. 15, 1814, the time, designated for the assembling of the convention. On that day twenrumors, suggesting treason, were set afloat, and the government sent Maj. Thomas S. Jesup with a regiment of soldiers to Hartford at the time of the opening of the convention, ostensibly to recruit for the regular army, but really to watch the moveme
of the war. They also proposed the consideration of some amendments to the Constitution on the subject of slave representation. The proposition was acceded to. Hartford was the place, and Thursday, Dec. 15, 1814, the time, designated for the assembling of the convention. On that day twenty-six delegates, representing Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Vermont, assembled and organized by the appointment of George Cabot, of Boston, as president of the body, and Theodore Dwight as secretary. The following are brief notes concerning the delegates: George Cabot, the president of the convention, was a descendant of one of the discoverers of the American continent of that name. He was a warm Whig during the Revolutionary struggle, and soon after the adoption of the national Constitution was chosen a Senator in Congress by the legislature of Massachusetts. He was a pure-hearted, lofty-minded citizen, a sound statesman, and a man beloved by all who knew him
lde was a lawyer, and was raised to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. Hodijah Baylies was an officer in the Continental army, in which he served efficiently. He was for many years judge of probate in his county, and was distinguished for sound understanding, fine talents, and unimpeachable integrity. Stephen Longfellow, Jr., was a lawyer of eminence in Portland, Me., where he stood at the head of his profession. He was a Representative in Congress. Chauncey Goodrich was an eminent lawyer, and for many years a member of the legislature of Connecticut, in each of its branches. He was also a member of each House of Congress, and lieutenantgovernor of Connecticut. His reputation was very exalted as a pure statesman and useful citizen. John Treadwell was in public stations in Connecticut a greater part of his life, where he was a member of each legislative branch of the government, a long time a judge of the court of common pleas, and both lieuten
of the highest reputation as possessor of the qualities of a good citizen. Daniel Lyman was a soldier of the Revolution, and rose to the rank of major in the Continental army. After the peace he settled as a lawyer in Rhode Island, where he became distinguished for talents and integrity. He was chief-justice of the Supreme Court of that State. Samuel Ward was a son of Governor Ward, of Rhode Island, and at the age of eighteen years was a captain in the Continental army. He was with Arnold in his expedition to Quebec, in 1775. At that city he was made a prisoner. Before the close of the war he rose to the rank of colonel. He was elected a member of the convention held at Annapolis, Md., in 1786, which was the inception of the convention that framed the national Constitution. Benjamin Hazard was a native of Rhode Island, and a lawyer, in which profession he was eminent. He served for many years in the legislature of his State. Edward Manton was a native of Rhode Islan
also a member of each House of Congress, and lieutenantgovernor of Connecticut. His reputation was very exalted as a pure statesman and useful citizen. John Treadwell was in public stations in Connecticut a greater part of his life, where he was a member of each legislative branch of the government, a long time a judge of the court of common pleas, and both lieutenant-governor and governor of the State. He was a Whig in the Revolution, and a politician of the Washington school. James Hillhouse was a man of eminent ability, and widely known. He was a lawyer of celebrity, served as a member of the legislature of Connecticut, and was for more than twenty years either a Senator or Representative in Congress. He fought bravely for his country in the Revolutionary War, and was always active, energetic, and public-spirited. Zephaniah Swift was a distinguished lawyer. He served as speaker of the Connecticut Assembly, and was a member of Congress, a judge, and, for a number of y
ecticut, and became a distinguished citizen of that State. He rose to great eminence in his profession, and was in Congress four years. He was repeatedly elected a member of the General Assembly, and was appointed a judge of the Supreme Court of Connecticut. Roger Minot Sherman was another distinguished lawyer of Connecticut, and was for a long time connected with the government of that State. He was a man of the highest reputation as possessor of the qualities of a good citizen. Daniel Lyman was a soldier of the Revolution, and rose to the rank of major in the Continental army. After the peace he settled as a lawyer in Rhode Island, where he became distinguished for talents and integrity. He was chief-justice of the Supreme Court of that State. Samuel Ward was a son of Governor Ward, of Rhode Island, and at the age of eighteen years was a captain in the Continental army. He was with Arnold in his expedition to Quebec, in 1775. At that city he was made a prisoner. Befo
w regulation of prices, on the basis of $20 in paper for $1 in coin; and they advised a general convention at Philadelphia at the beginning of 1780, to adopt a scheme for all the colonies. Congress approved the suggestion of the convention, but urged the States to adopt the regulation at once, without waiting for a general convention. The second, politically known as the Hartford Convention, was convened on Dec. 15, 1814. Because the Massachusetts militia had not been placed under General Dearborn's orders, the Secretary of State, in an official letter to Governor Strong, refused to pay the expenses of defending Massachusetts from the common foe. Similar action, for similar cause, had occurred in the case of Connecticut, and a clamor was instantly raised that New England was abandoned to the enemy by the national government. A joint committee of the legislature of Massachusetts made a report on the state of public affairs, which contained a covert threat of independent action
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