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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). Search the whole document.

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March 15th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 16
Appendix I: newspaper article, in favor of General Meade, mentioned in letter of March 15, 1864. see page 180, Vol. II (the Round table, a Weekly record of the notable, the useful and the Tasteful) (New York, Saturday, March 12, 1864) Ought General Meade to be removed? This question is now absorbing the attention of the authorities at Washington, and soon will be, if it is not already, decided. The fatality that has attached to every commander of the brave Army of the Potomac has affixed itself to General Meade. The movement against him, at first only whispered among a few discontented subordinates in the army, has at last reached the capital, and has attained the dignity—if dignity it be—of an open opposition. The main movers appear to be General Daniel E. Sickles and the new Committee on the Conduct of the War. It is urged that General Meade is too slow; that but for the dash of some of his division commanders the victory at Gettysburg would have been a cowardly retreat;<
March 12th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 16
Appendix I: newspaper article, in favor of General Meade, mentioned in letter of March 15, 1864. see page 180, Vol. II (the Round table, a Weekly record of the notable, the useful and the Tasteful) (New York, Saturday, March 12, 1864) Ought General Meade to be removed? This question is now absorbing the attention of the authorities at Washington, and soon will be, if it is not already, decided. The fatality that has attached to every commander of the brave Army of the Potomac has affixed itself to General Meade. The movement against him, at first only whispered among a few discontented subordinates in the army, has at last reached the capital, and has attained the dignity—if dignity it be—of an open opposition. The main movers appear to be General Daniel E. Sickles and the new Committee on the Conduct of the War. It is urged that General Meade is too slow; that but for the dash of some of his division commanders the victory at Gettysburg would have been a cowardly retreat;<
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