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Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
ing, but I am sorry to say it has not been taken yet. I attacked it on the twenty-fourth instant with the Ironsides, Canonicus, Mahopac, Monadnock, Minnesota, Colorado, Mohican, Tuscarora, Wabash, Susquehanna, Brooklyn, Powhatan, Juniata, Seneca, Shenandoah, Pawtuxet, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Maumee, Yantic, Kansas, Iosco, Quakervessels not forming proper lines and throwing them out of place), and fought their guns well. The taking of a new position while under fire, by the Brooklyn and Colorado, was a beautiful sight, and when they got into place both ships delivered a fire that nothing could withstand. The Brooklyn well sustained her proud name undehers who had ventured near the forts were wounded by our shells. As the ammunition gave out the vessels retired from action, and the iron-clads and Minnesota, Colorado, and Susquehanna were ordered to open rapidly, which they did with such effect that it seemed to tear the works to pieces. We drew off at sunset, leaving the ir
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 196
ery respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of rear-admiral Porter. see document 76, page 490, ante. flag-ship Malvern, off New Inlet, Northery respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-ship Malvern, at sea, off New Inlet, N. C., December 26, 1864. sir — I was very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Effect of the Exlposion of the powder-boat. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-ship Malvern, off New Inleery respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Confederate reports. General Whiting's report. headquarters, Wilmington, December 31, 1864. Colonel
Quaker City (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
orado, Mohican, Tuscarora, Wabash, Susquehanna, Brooklyn, Powhatan, Juniata, Seneca, Shenandoah, Pawtuxet, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Maumee, Yantic, Kansas, Iosco, Quaker City, Monticello, Rhode Island, Sassacus, Chippewa, Osceola, Tacony, Pontoosuc, Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, and Vanderbilt, having a reserve of small vessels, cos marked on the chart, and added their fire to that already begun. The Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Chippewa, Sassacus, Rhode Island, Monticello, Quaker City, and Iosco dropped into position according to order, and the battle became general. In one hour and fifteen minutes after the first shot was fired not a shot cand directing his fire. Twice his guns cut down the flagstaff on the Mound battery, and he silenced the guns there in a very short time, the Keystone State and Quaker City cooperating effectively. Lieutenant Commander J. L. Davis, with both rudders disabled, got his vessel, the Sassacus, into close action, and assisted material
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 196
Fort Fisher. North Atlantic Squadron, United States flag-ship Malvern, off Wilmington, Decembet care and without accident, in tow of the United States steamer Sassacus, Lieutenant Commander J. c. Report of Com, H. K. Thatcher. United States steamer Colorado, off Beaufort, N. C., Dec. C. Report of Commodore Schenck. United States steamer Powhatan, off Beaufort, N. C., Jan Report of Comm. William Radford. United States steamer New Ironsides, Anchored at sea, Be Report of Captain D. B. Ridgely, United States steamer Shenandoah, off Beaufort N. C., Den. Report of Captain James Alden. United States steamer Brooklyn, off Beaufort, N. C. Deceron. Report of Com. J. C. Howell. United States steamer Nereus, Beaufort, N. C., January 3 Report of Lieut.-Com. T. C. Harris. United States steamship Yantic, Beaufort, N. C., Januaryorced the garrison. Lieutenant Chapman, Confederate States navy, commanding battery Buchanan, by hi[6 more...]
Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
tenant Commander Truxtun, sent us a relief-crew after the gale. Both vessels furnished us a boat. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. C. Rhind, Commander, U. S. N. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter. Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Report of Lieutenant-Commander W. G. Temple. United States steamer Pontoosuc, off New Inlet, December 28, 1864 sir — I have to submit the following report of the operations of this vessel in the attack upon the rebel works at the mouth of Cape Fear river, from December twenty-fourth to twenty-seventh, inclusively. At eleven A. M. of the twenty-fourth, after some previous manoeuvring, we got under way in company with the fleet, and stood in (with everything ready for action) in the wake of the four ironclads until Fort Fisher bore southwest by south, when we opened fire at 1:06 P. M. with the hundred-pounder Parrott rifles, at long range, and gradually closed in toward the position occupied by the sternmost monitor, from whence the ni
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
her terrific battery. The Minnesota then took her position in handsome style, and her guns, after getting the range, were fired with rapidity, while the Mohican, Colorado, and the large vessels marked on the plan, got to their stations, all firing to cover themselves while anchoring. By the time the last of the large vessels anchored and got their batteries into play, but one or two guns of the enemy were fired, this feu d'enfer giving them all to their bomb-proofs. The small gunboats Kansas, Unadilla, Pequot. Seneca, Pontoosuc, Yantic, and Huron took positions to the northward and eastward of the monitors, and enfilading the works. The Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Tacony, and Vanderbilt took effective positions as marked on the chart, and added their fire to that already begun. The Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Chippewa, Sassacus, Rhode Island, Monticello, Quaker City, and Iosco dropped into position according to order, and the battle became general. In
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
t one of his rudders, he took her safely into Beaufort, where he filled her up with powder, and perfe. On the eighteenth instant I sailed from Beaufort with all the monitors, New Ironsides, and smave ordered the largest vessels to proceed off Beaufort and fill up with ammunition, to be ready for United States steamer Colorado, off Beaufort, N. C., December 31, 1864. Admiral — In complvid D. Porter, Commanding N. A. Squadron, Beaufort, N. C. Report of Commodore Schenck. Unitates steamer New Ironsides, Anchored at sea, Beaufort bearing N. N. W., Distant about five miles frlor. United States ship Juniata, off Beaufort, N. C., December 30, 1864. sir — I have the hy, United States steamer Shenandoah, off Beaufort N. C., December 31, 1864. sir — I have the. United States steamer Mohican, off Beaufort, N. C., December 31, 1864. Admiral — I have tris. United States steamship Yantic, Beaufort, N. C., January 2, 1865. sir — In obedience t[9 mor
Christmas (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
rom the north-east angle of Fort Fisher. We then reopened heavily, but more to the left than we had previously fired, to avoid annoying our own troops, who were seen approaching the fort. The effect of this last heavy fire was apparently severe upon the casemated works to the southward and westward of Fort Fisher. At this time a succession of explosions was heard in the rear of these casemates, followed by the blaze of a large building, which continued to burn during the greater part of Christmas night. My impression with regard to the defensibility of the post (battered as it was) against a combined attack of the army and navy is, that it could have been carried by assault on either of the evenings of the twenty-fourth or twenty-fifth instant. I do not suppose that it was deemed possible entirely to demolish a casemated earthwork like Fort Fisher, but I am satisfied that everything was done that could be done on the part of the navy to render it untenable, the enemy having b
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
asier conquest than is supposed. I do not, however, pretend to place my opinion in opposition to General Weitzel, whom I know to be an accomplished soldier and engineer, and whose opinion has great weight with me. I will look out that the troops are all off in safety. We will have a west wind presently, and a smooth beach about three o'clock, when sufficient boats will be sent for them. The prisoners now on board the Santiago de Cuba will be delivered to the provost marshal at Fortress Monroe, unless you wish to take them on board one of the transports, which would be inconvenient just now. I remain, General, respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral Major-General B. F. Butler, Commanding, &c. &c. &c. Report of Com, H. K. Thatcher. United States steamer Colorado, off Beaufort, N. C., December 31, 1864. Admiral — In compliance with your General Order No. 75, under date of thirtieth instant, I have the honor to say that in the actions o
Zeke's Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
and where the original channel was we found a shallow bar. I sent Lieutenant W. B. Cushing in to sound and buoy out a channel, if he could find one, with orders to Commander Guest to drag for torpedoes and be ready to run in by the buoys when ordered. The examination was not at all satisfactory. A very narrow and crooked channel was partly made out and buoyed, but running so close to the upper forts that boats could not work there. Lieutenant Cushing went in in his boat as far as Zeke's Island, but his researches would not justify my attempting the passage with six double-enders, some of which had burst their rifled Parrott guns and injured many of their men. As it was getting late, and the troops were making slow progress in landing, I withdrew the vessels and boats that were searching for the channel, and sent them to help land the troops, otherwise we might have succeeded in buoying it out, though it was a difficult thing for the boats to work under the fire of the upper
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