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, politics, and business, and the corridors boom with voices, like the uproar of a stormy sea. To-night the scene in our Rotunda is a sight. General Sheridan, dressed in plain clothes, is standing near a shaft, puffing his cigar, and chatting with his friends. Is it design or accident, his standing with his back against that shaft, so that his person is covered from assault except in front? About him fret and seethe a crowd of citizens, many of them bearing proud, historic names. General Ogden is here, General Taylor is here, and General Penn is here. The lame man pushing through the crowd is General Badger, now recovering from his wounds. The gentlemen near Sheridan, also in plain clothes, are General Emory and Colonel Sheridan, a younger brother of the chief. Banditti! How the Southern fire darts out, the Southern pride expands, as Senator and General cross the hall, restrained alike by courtesy and policy from rushing on the man who calls them outlaws and is only waiting
he affair is on, and must be settled .either yea or nay. If Grant backs down, there will be peace; if not, there will be war.a living face on which a man might read the secrets of President Grant's Cabinet. All ears are strained towards the telegrapning voices with Democrats in denouncing the policy of President Grant. The venerable Bryant leads the way in New York; the politics, leave their books and join these enemies of President Grant. Here is an act done in a time of peace, says Curtis, ay for their political friends, the cause is lost; yet President Grant was minded to go on, assume the burthen of events, andperior, and some of the leading journals are demanding that Grant shall retire from the White House, leaving his powers in Wite. This menace tells. Fish is not only the ablest man in Grant's Cabinet, but one of the ablest men in America. Bristow, s. On what a thread the issue seems to hang! While President Grant is pondering pros and cons, a pistol-shot, fired by a
Chapter 11: the Rotunda. Scene-Rotunda, New Orleans; marble floor, and open galleries, supported by fluted shafts. Time-Wednesday, January 13, 1875, eight o'clock in the evening. Persons present-General Sheridan, with his staff, Lieutenant-governor Penn, Senators, Members of Congress, foreign consuls, sea captains, newspaper scouts, orderlies, messengers, telegraph clerks, and other crowds, including two English travellers. Temperature-boiling point of mercury. Look out for squallsding with his back against that shaft, so that his person is covered from assault except in front? About him fret and seethe a crowd of citizens, many of them bearing proud, historic names. General Ogden is here, General Taylor is here, and General Penn is here. The lame man pushing through the crowd is General Badger, now recovering from his wounds. The gentlemen near Sheridan, also in plain clothes, are General Emory and Colonel Sheridan, a younger brother of the chief. Banditti! How the
Benjamin H. Bristow (search for this): chapter 11
takes no pains to hide his views. Vice-President Wilson opposes his official superior, and some of the leading journals are demanding that Grant shall retire from the White House, leaving his powers in Wilson's hands. More than all else, Hamilton Fish declares that if the President sustains Sheridan and justifies Durell and Packard, he will resign his post as Secretary of State. This menace tells. Fish is not only the ablest man in Grant's Cabinet, but one of the ablest men in America. Bristow, Secretary of the Treasury, takes the same line as Fish. Without these gentlemen, the President's Cabinet could not stand a week; and if his Cabinet falls, who knows what else may fall? The Governors of powerful States are talking in an ominous way. A State has disappeared, says Governor Alien to the people of Ohio; a sovereign State of this Union has no existence this night. A sovereign State! The President thinks he put an end to all that babble about sovereign States on the battle
W. W. Belknap (search for this): chapter 11
rom Washington! Read, read! scream a hundred voices. One of the clerks jumps on a bench, the printed telegraph slip in his hand, and waving it before his audience, cries out lustily: Gentlemen, the President backs down! Backs down? each wild and pallid auditor asks his neighbour; Yes, backs down! At once the strained and tragic situation softens; lips relax, eyes lighten into humour, and everyone begins to chatter and shake hands. Some slip away to spread the news elsewhere. The knots and groups break up, and many seek for details in the messages which still keep pouring in. Play over, says the well-known voice; Durell repudiated, Belknap discredited, Sheridan excused. The President abandons all responsibility. Sheridan is not sustained, and his recommendations are described as unlawful. Yes, the play is over. Sheridan will now have time for his pleasure trip, and he may then go home to his wedding-cake. Third term? The third term is dead. Exit Caesar!
g his cigar, and chatting with his friends. Is it design or accident, his standing with his back against that shaft, so that his person is covered from assault except in front? About him fret and seethe a crowd of citizens, many of them bearing proud, historic names. General Ogden is here, General Taylor is here, and General Penn is here. The lame man pushing through the crowd is General Badger, now recovering from his wounds. The gentlemen near Sheridan, also in plain clothes, are General Emory and Colonel Sheridan, a younger brother of the chief. Banditti! How the Southern fire darts out, the Southern pride expands, as Senator and General cross the hall, restrained alike by courtesy and policy from rushing on the man who calls them outlaws and is only waiting for a word to string them up! With what a cold and haughty mien these magnates pass the shaft against which Sheridan leans! Have you no fear of accidents? I ask General Penn. Not much, he answers; we are fierc
heridan and justifies Durell and Packard, he will resign his post as Secretary of State. This menace tells. Fish is not only the ablest man in Grant's Cabinet, but one of the ablest men in America. Bristow, Secretary of the Treasury, takes the same line as Fish. Without these gentlemen, the President's Cabinet could not stand a week; and if his Cabinet falls, who knows what else may fall? The Governors of powerful States are talking in an ominous way. A State has disappeared, says Governor Alien to the people of Ohio; a sovereign State of this Union has no existence this night. A sovereign State! The President thinks he put an end to all that babble about sovereign States on the battle field, and here, in one of the rich and populous northern cities, the Governor of a great State is talking of Louisiana as a sovereign member of the Union. Governor Tilden, of New York, is still more menacing and emphatic: For similar acts our English ancestors sent the first Charles to the sc
ed resolved to back his lieutenant. He was asked by the Senate to state what is passing in New Orleans, and how he means to deal with matters; for the reports of Foster, Phelps, and Potter to Congress, clearing the White citizens of New Orleans, and charging disorder in the South on the military party, have created a profound excitement. When such party men as Foster and Phelps can find no word to say for their political friends, the cause is lost; yet President Grant was minded to go on, assume the burthen of events, and leave Sheridan free to take his course. He framed a Message to Congress in this sense. But beyond the War Office, where his adjutference with the Legislature of New Orleans, the South is gone. The Senators fear to face new trials. Are they to go further in a course for which Radicals like Foster and Phelps cannot say a word? High office has no effect in softening censure of the President's course. General Sherman takes no pains to hide his views. Vi
Stephen B. Packard (search for this): chapter 11
hese enemies of President Grant. Here is an act done in a time of peace, says Curtis, so dangerous to all civil freedom, so bold and reckless a violation of law, that men who have condoned everything else are compelled to speak out. Kellogg and Packard, Antoine. and Pinchback, are forgotten in the fury now being vented on the great criminal at the White House. Impeachment is demanded in a thousand voices. Resignation is suggested, and in fact announced. The country seems aflame, the whole rior, and some of the leading journals are demanding that Grant shall retire from the White House, leaving his powers in Wilson's hands. More than all else, Hamilton Fish declares that if the President sustains Sheridan and justifies Durell and Packard, he will resign his post as Secretary of State. This menace tells. Fish is not only the ablest man in Grant's Cabinet, but one of the ablest men in America. Bristow, Secretary of the Treasury, takes the same line as Fish. Without these gentl
ved to back his lieutenant. He was asked by the Senate to state what is passing in New Orleans, and how he means to deal with matters; for the reports of Foster, Phelps, and Potter to Congress, clearing the White citizens of New Orleans, and charging disorder in the South on the military party, have created a profound excitement. When such party men as Foster and Phelps can find no word to say for their political friends, the cause is lost; yet President Grant was minded to go on, assume the burthen of events, and leave Sheridan free to take his course. He framed a Message to Congress in this sense. But beyond the War Office, where his adjutants fumh the Legislature of New Orleans, the South is gone. The Senators fear to face new trials. Are they to go further in a course for which Radicals like Foster and Phelps cannot say a word? High office has no effect in softening censure of the President's course. General Sherman takes no pains to hide his views. Vice-Presiden
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