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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. Search the whole document.

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Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
soldiers, that they might have strength to bear up under their trials, and that God would remove the obstacles to a speedy exchange of prisoners. Never did men need more the consolations of religion than those who on both sides were held as prisoners of war. The winter of 1864 was extremely severe. At Cairo, Ill., the mercury, near the last of January, stood at 15 degrees below zero. At St. Louis it was at 25 below zero, and the river was crossed by heavy wagons on the solid ice. At Chicago the guards at Camp Douglass had to be changed every 30 minutes to prevent freezing, but were all frost-bitten in this short time The Times of that city said of the condition of the prisoners: The suffering and tortures endured by the prisoners was beyond the power of pen to portray. Unaccustomed to the Northern climate and cold lake and prairie winds, their light Southern garb was a poor protection against the ordinary temperature of the elements. But with the winds maddened int
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
rom the enemy's lines. Yankees, wounded and in prospect of death, have thanked him for his pleadings with God in their behalf, and for pointing them to Jesus, the Friend of sinners. Let my enemies North revile, yet, from my heart of hearts, I can pray God to have mercy on them and lead them to repentance and salvation. Bless them which persecute you; bless and curse not. We have already referred to the gallant band that General Price led from Missouri, and their deeds of valor at Corinth, Miss., and other places, are well-known to those who can recall the scenes in the Southwest. One of the most faithful laborers in this corps of our army was Rev. Dr. B. T. Kavanaugh, who has kindly sent us the following account of the revival which prevailed in General Price's corps on this side and beyond the Mississippi: Among those who came out of Missouri with Gen. Price's army were Jno. R. Bennett (your brother), W. M. Patterson, Nathaniel M. Talbott, and myself, besides Bros. Min
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
testimony of one of the most pious and devoted chaplains in the Army of Northern Virginia. Rev. P. F. August, who served with the gallant Fifteenth Virginia regiment, Corse's brigade, writes to us: The 15th Virginia regiment, Corse's brigade, Pickett's division, shared in the blessings of the great revival in the Confederate army. I have the names of about fifty of that regiment who were converted while in the field of service. One of these, J. R. Eddleton, a very young man from Hanover county, was mortally wounded in a skirmish. When borne off the field on a litter he said to his comrades: Boys, tell my mother how I went --meaning, Tell her that I fell discharging my duty with my face to the enemy. For twenty-four hours he suffered very much, but met death, not only calmly, but triumphantly. He left an assurance that he was accepted with God, and felt that the blessed Saviour would save him forever. His dying request was that his mother should be written to and informed
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
e M. E. Church, South, emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great harvest. Rev. Dr. Myers, of the Southern Christian Advocate, in noticing these facts, says: The Mississippi Conference appointed one missionary and two chaplains to the army; Memphis, one missionary and six chaplains; Alabama, four missionaries and twelve chaplains; Florida, one missionary and two chaplains; Georgia, eight missionaries and eight chaplains; South Carolina, thirteen chaplains; North Carolina, two missionaries and eight chaplains; Virginia, two missionaries and twenty chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these eight Conferences. Of course, the Conferences beyond our lines furnish a number also; but except in the case of the General Missionaries, sent out by the Parent Board, we can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the sessio
Russellville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
near Savannah, Ga.: He preached in January 16 sermons, travelled about 400 miles, distributed 177 books, conversed privately with several soldiers on religion, and prayed with 102 soldiers who professed to be seeking Christ. Rev. A. M. Thigpen labored in Colquitt's brigade near Charleston. In the 23d Georgia, 60 conversions. The meeting was conducted in harmony by Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists. Rev. Geo. W. Yarbrough reported from General Longstreet's army near Russellville, Tenn: At Petersburg I entered upon my missionary work, having been thrown with a large number of troops on their way to this army; and, having been supplied by the Evangelical Tract Society there with a variety of very interesting religious papers. Dr. Miller, the agent, promised me an abundant supply as soon as transportation could be furnished. I went through the cars on Saturday, furnished all the troops by way of preparing them for the Sabbath, and was glad to find them not on
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these eight Conferences. Of course, the Conferences beyond our lines furnish a number also; but except in the case of the General Missionaries, sent out by the Parent Board, we can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ve escaped us, the Conferences of the M. E. Church, South, emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great harvest. Rev. Dr. Myers, of the Southern Christian Advocate, in noticing these facts, says: The Mississippi Conference appointed one missionary and two chaplains to the army; Memphis, one missionary and six chaplains; Alabama, four missionaries and twelve chaplains; Florida, one missionary and two chaplains; Georgia, eight missionaries and eight chaplains; South Carolina, thirteen chaplains; North Carolina, two missionaries and eight chaplains; Virginia, two missionaries and twenty chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these eight Conferences. Of course, the Conferences beyond our lines furnish a number also; but except in the case of the General Missionaries, sent out by the Parent Board, we can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to eac
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
rnestly, and prepared the way for the extraordinary work of grace which blessed the armies in the last year of the war. From the army at Dalton, Ga., now under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, there came an earnest call for Testaments and Bibles. A soldier showed me. says Rev. S. M. Cherry, a Testament a few days ago that he had brought from his home in Tennessee, and had carried in his side-pocket for over two years. Another solicited a Bible, saying that just before he left Missionary Ridge he found part of an old Bible and read it, and was now desirous of getting the entire volume of inspiration. Often I am approached by the soldiers, who inquire, Parson, is there no chance to get a Bible. I am very anxious to procure a copy, and am willing to pay any price for a pocket-Bible. We are unable to supply one-fourth of the demand for the Scriptures; and yet we know there are thousands of Bibles all over the South--that are rarely read by the possessors. Almost every librar
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
, or one chosen by themselves for that purpose, shall act as Moderator. The officers will meet once a month, and oftener if necessary; and in the exercise of discipline will be guided by the direction of Christ. They will keep a record of the names of all the members and the manner in which their ecclesiastical connection with this church is dissolved. From the Trans-Mississippi let us return to the banks of the Rappahannock and note the revival scenes as we come. Writing from Kingston, Ga., Feb. 4, Dr. J. B. McFerrin says: We have a good meeting in progress. It has been going forward since Sunday last. Large crowds, mostly soldiers, are in attendance. Many penitents, some conversions, and a few backsliders reclaimed. Last night five asked for membership in the Church of God. We give the applicants choice of Churches and receive them into various Christian organizations-different divisions, but one grand army. From Dalton, Feb. 3, Rev. A. D. McVoy sent good ti
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
n, dying in the hospital, wrote to his wife: I don't want you to be uneasy about me, but do not forget to pray for me. I still have strong confidence in the Lord, and endeavor to put my trust in him in all cases. I hope the Lord may take care of you; and if we should not meet again on earth, may we meet in heaven, where wars and sorrows are forever gone. God helping, we'll meet you there. The death of Col. Peyton H. Colquitt was that of a true Christian hero. He had served at Norfolk, Va., and as Colonel of the 46th Georgia at Charleston and in Mississippi. On the field of Chickamauga he was in command of a brigade. It was ordered to charge a battery; and while riding up and down the line in front of his men, speaking to them words of encouragement, he was struck in the breast by a ball and fell from his horse. His friend, Hon. W. F. Samford, wrote a touching memorial of the gallant soldier, from which we extract the following account of his last moments: He was
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