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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
els of the concern, but only how two of the smallest ones went round, and what turned up in the going. Twenty-four hours we were in making the journey between Baltimore and Gettysburg, places only four hours apart in ordinary running time; and this will give you some idea of the difficulty there was in bringing up supplies when unded three or four miles out from the town, went up and down among the men in the morning, and said, Any of you boys who can make your way to the cars can go to Baltimore. So off start all who think they feel well enough; anything better than the hospitals, so called, for the first few days after a battle. Once the men have the ttendants, bringing a first-rate supply of necessities and comforts for the wounded, which they handed over to the Commission. Twice a day the trains left for Baltimore or Harrisburg, and twice a day we fed all the wounded who arrived for them. Things were systematized now, and the men came down in long ambulance trains to the
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ces of contrivance and management in any emergency, made the severe labor seem light, and by keeping up the spirits of the entire party, prevented the scenes of suffering constantly presented from rendering them morbid or depressed. She took the position of assistant superintendent of the Portsmouth Grove General Hospital, in September, 1862, when her friend, Miss Wormeley, became superintendent, and remained there till the spring of 1863, was actively engaged in the care of the wounded at Falmouth after the battle of Chancellorsville, was on the field soon after the battle of Gettysburg, and wrote that charming and graphic account of the labors of herself and a friend at Gettysburg in the service of the Sanitary Commission which was so widely circulated, and several times reprinted in English reviews and journals. We cannot refrain from introducing it as one of those narratives of actual philanthropic work of which we have altogether too few. Three weeks at Gettysburg. July, 186
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
l and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of President Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldiers. She was for ten months assistant superintendent of the Portsmouth Grove General Hospital, and her winning manners, her tender and skilful care of the patients, and her unwearied efforts to do them good, made her a general favorite.
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
of it. Her pity for the sufferings of the men was something pathetic in itself, but it was never morbid, never unwise, never derived from her own shock at the sight, always practical and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of President Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldiers. She was for ten months assistant superintendent of
Belle Plain (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
gy would ever have dreamt of it. Her pity for the sufferings of the men was something pathetic in itself, but it was never morbid, never unwise, never derived from her own shock at the sight, always practical and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of President Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldiers. She was for ten months a
Robert Howland (search for this): chapter 12
charge of the Freedmen at Richmond Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, at Portsmouth Grove Hospital We are not aware of any other instance among the women who have devoted themselves to works of philanthropy and patriotism during the recent war, in which four sisters have together consecrated their services to the cause of the nation. In social position, culture, refinement, and all that could make life pleasant, Misses Georgiana and Jane C. Woolsey, and their married sisters, Mrs. Joseph and Mrs. Robert Howland, were blessed above most women; and if there were any who might have deemed themselves excused from entering upon the drudgery, the almost menial service incident to the Hospital Transport service, to the position of Assistant Superintendent of a crowded hospital, of nurse in field hospitals after a great battle, or of instructors and superintendents of freedmen and freedwomen; these ladies might have pleaded an apology for some natural shrinking from the work, from its dissimilarity
Robert S. Howland (search for this): chapter 12
poem addressed to her by a soldier her encouragement and assistance to the women nurses appointed by Miss Dix Mrs. Robert S. Howland her labors in the hospitals and at the Metropolitan Sanitary Fair her early death from over-exertion in connectble death by their persistent toil, nor by a nation grateful for the services rendered to its brave defenders. Mrs. Robert S. Howland was the wife of a clergyman, and an earnest worker in the hospitals and in the Metropolitan Sanitary Fair, and he that fair, contributed to shorten a life as precious and beautiful as was ever offered upon the altar of patriotism. Mrs. Howland possessed rare poetic genius, and some of her effusions, suggested by incidents of army or hospital life, are worthy oheart. And grasp his banner still, Though all its blue be dim; These stripes, no less than stars, Lead after Him. Mrs. Howland died in the summer of 1864. Miss Georgiana M. Woolsey, was one of the most efficient ladies connected with the Hosp
Sarah C. Woolsey (search for this): chapter 12
s Woolsey's rare capacities for her work estimate of a lady friend Miss Jane Stuart Woolsey labors in hospitals her charge of the Freedmen at Richmond Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, at Portsmouth Grove Hospital We are not aware of any other instance among the women who have devoted themselves to works of philanthropy and patriotismendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of President Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldPresident Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldiers. She was for ten months assistant superintendent of the Portsmouth Grove General Hospital, and her winning manners, her tender and skilful care of the patients, and her unwearied efforts to do them good, made her a general favorite.
and at sunset I put my hand on the lieutenant's heart, to find it still. All night the brother lay close against the coffin, and in the morning went away with his comrades, leaving us to bury Henry, having confidence; but first thanking us for what we had done, and giving us all that he had to show his gratitude,the palmetto ornament from his brother's cap and a button from his coat. Dr. W. read the burial service that morning at the grave, and wrote his name on the little head-board: Lieutenant Rauch, Fourteenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers. In the field where we buried him, a number of colored freedmen, working for Government on the railroad, had their camp, and every night they took their recreation, after the heavy work of the day was over, in prayer-meetings. Such an inferior race, you know! We went over one night and listened for an hour, while they sang, collected under the fly of a tent, a table in the middle where the leader sat, and benches all round the sides fo
Dorothea L. Dix (search for this): chapter 12
Mrs. Joseph lowland and her labors on the Hospital Transport her tender and skilful nursing of the sick and wounded of her husband's regiment poem addressed to her by a soldier her encouragement and assistance to the women nurses appointed by Miss Dix Mrs. Robert S. Howland her labors in the hospitals and at the Metropolitan Sanitary Fair her early death from over-exertion in connection with the Fair her poetical contributions to the national cause in the Hospital Miss Georgiana M. Wovented Mrs. Howland from further active service in the field; but whenever her health permitted, she visited and labored in the hospitals around Washington, and her thoughtful attention and words of encouragement to the women nurses appointed by Miss Dix, and receiving a paltry stipend from the Government, were most gratefully appreciated by those self-denying, hard-working, and often sorely-tried women-many of them the peers in culture, refinement and intellect of any lady in the land, but tre
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