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Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
be withdrawn. To each of these hospital transports several ladies were assigned by the Commission to take charge of the diet of the patients, assist in dressing their wounds, and generally to care for their comfort and welfare. Mr. Olmstead, and Mr. Knapp, the Assistant Secretary, had also in their company, or as they pleasantly called them, members of their staff, four ladies, who remained in the service, not leaving the vicinity of the Peninsula, until the transfer of the troops to Acquia Creek and Alexandria late in August. These ladies remained for the most part on board the Daniel Webster, or the Wilson Small, or wherever the headquarters of the Commission in the field might be. Their duties consisted in nursing, preparing food for the sick and wounded, dressing wounds, in connexion with the surgeons and medical students, and in general, making themselves useful to the great numbers of wounded and sick who were placed temporarily under their charge. Often they provided the
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
hich might at that time be lying at Alexandria. Under this authorization the Daniel Webster was assigned to the Commission on the 25th of April, and having been fitted up, the stores shipped, and the hospital corps for it assembled, it reached York River on the 30th of April. Other boats were subsequently, (several of them, very soon) assigned to the Commission, and were successively fitted up, and after receiving their freights of sick and wounded, sent to Washington, Philadelphia, New Yorkssion's headquarters in the Peninsula. Their position and duties were in many respects more trying and arduous than those who accompanied the sick and wounded to the hospitals of the cities. The Daniel Webster, which, as we have said, reached York River April 30, discharged her stores except what would be needed for her trip to New York, and having placed them in a store-house on shore, began to supply the sick in camp and hospital, and to receive such patients on board as it was deemed expedi
Saint Marks (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ffering of others, and finally gave himself a sacrifice for them. Dr. Robert Ware. We are coaling here to-night ( Wilson Small, off Norfolk, June 30th, 1862). We left White House Saturday night, and rendezvoused at West Point. Captain Sawtelle sent us off early, with despatches for Fortress Monroe; this gave us the special fun of being the first to come leisurely into the panic then raging at Yorktown. The Small was instantly surrounded by terror-stricken boats; the people of the big St. Mark leaned, pale, over their bulwarks, to question us. Nothing could be more delightful than to be as calm and monosyllabic as we were. We leave at daybreak for Harrison's Bar, James River, where our gunboats are said to be; we hope to get further up, but General Dix warns us that it is not safe. What are we about to learn? No one here can tell. (Harrison's Bar, July 2d). We arrived here yesterday to hear the thunder of the battle, Malvern Hill. and to find the army just approaching t
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ny due measure convey to your mind the impressions left on mine in observing, even casually, the operations in the care of the sick at these two points. When we remember what was done by the same noble band of laborers after the battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, in ministering to the wants of thousands of wounded, I am sure that we shall join with them in gratitude and thankfulness that they were enabled to be there. But the end of it all was at hand; the change of base, of which t long as possible, till the telegraph wires had been cut, and the enemy was announced, by mounted messengers, to be at Tunstall's; in fact, till the roar of the battle came nearer, and we knew that Stoneman with his cavalry was falling back to Williamsburg, and that the enemy were about to march into our deserted places. All night we sat on the deck of The Small slowly moving away, watching the constantly increasing cloud and the fire-flashes over the trees towards the White House; watching t
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
was hourly expected — were on the spot, and ready. The Elm City happened to be full of fever cases. A vague rumor of a battle prevailed, soon made certain by the sound of the cannonading; and she left at once (4 A. M.) to discharge her sick at Yorktown, and performed the great feat of getting back to White House, cleaned, and with her beds made, before sunset of the same day. By that time the wounded were arriving. The boats of the Commission filled up calmly. The young men had a system by w, 1862). We left White House Saturday night, and rendezvoused at West Point. Captain Sawtelle sent us off early, with despatches for Fortress Monroe; this gave us the special fun of being the first to come leisurely into the panic then raging at Yorktown. The Small was instantly surrounded by terror-stricken boats; the people of the big St. Mark leaned, pale, over their bulwarks, to question us. Nothing could be more delightful than to be as calm and monosyllabic as we were. We leave at daybr
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
arf Relief tents at White House depot at Savage's Station the departure from White House arrival at Harrison's Landing-. running past the rebel batteries at City Point I'll take those mattresses you spoke of the wounded of the seven days battles you are so kind, I-am so weak Exchanging prisoners under flag of truce Reached Harrison's Bar at 11 A. M., July 1st, and were ordered to go up the James River, as far as Carter's Landing. To do this we must pass the batteries at City Point. We were told there was no danger if we should carry a yellow flag; yellow flag we had none, so we trusted to the red Sanitary Commission, and prepared to run he various vessels had made several trips in the service of the Commission, and one voyage of The Spaulding must not pass unrecorded. We were ordered up to City Point, under a flag of truce, to receive our wounded men who were prisoners in Richmond. At last the whistle sounded and the train came in sight. The poor fellow
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
! nine in ten addled! It must be understood that wash-basins in the rear of an army are made of tin. And here is one more such story: We were called to go on board The Wissahickon, from thence to The Sea-shore and run down in the latter to West Point, to bring off twenty-five men said to be lying there sick and destitute. Two doctors went with us. After hunting an hour for The Sea-shore in vain, and having got as low as Cumberland, we decided (we being Mrs. Howland and I, for the doctors lived in and for the suffering of others, and finally gave himself a sacrifice for them. Dr. Robert Ware. We are coaling here to-night ( Wilson Small, off Norfolk, June 30th, 1862). We left White House Saturday night, and rendezvoused at West Point. Captain Sawtelle sent us off early, with despatches for Fortress Monroe; this gave us the special fun of being the first to come leisurely into the panic then raging at Yorktown. The Small was instantly surrounded by terror-stricken boats; th
Cumberland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rambling eggs in a wash-basin over a spirit-lamp:--and such eggs! nine in ten addled! It must be understood that wash-basins in the rear of an army are made of tin. And here is one more such story: We were called to go on board The Wissahickon, from thence to The Sea-shore and run down in the latter to West Point, to bring off twenty-five men said to be lying there sick and destitute. Two doctors went with us. After hunting an hour for The Sea-shore in vain, and having got as low as Cumberland, we decided (we being Mrs. Howland and I, for the doctors were new and docile, and glad to leave the responsibility upon us women) to push on in the tug, rather than leave the men another night on the ground, as a heavy storm of wind and rain had been going on all the day. The pilot remonstrated, but the captain approved; and, if the firemen had not suddenly let out the fires, and detained us two hours, we might have got our men on board, and returned, comfortably, soon after dark. But th
Harriet Douglas Whetten (search for this): chapter 9
wife of Colonel (afterward General) Joseph Howland, and her sister, Miss Georgiana Woolsey, both of New York. Among those who were in charge of the Hospital Transports for one or more of their trips to the cities we have named, and by their tenderness and gentleness comforted and cheered the poor sufferers, and often by their skilful nursing rescued them from the jaws of death, were Mrs. George T. Strong, the wife of the Treasurer of the Commission, who made four or five trips; Miss Harriet Douglas Whetten, who served throughout the Peninsular Campaign as head of the Women's Department on the S. R. Spaulding; Mrs. Laura Trotter, (now Mrs. Charles Parker) of Boston, who occupied a similar position on the Daniel Webster; Mrs. Bailey, at the head of the Women's Department on the Elm City; Mrs. Charlotte Bradford, a Massachusetts lady who made several trips on the Elm City and Knickerbocker; Miss Amy M. Bradley, whose faithful services are elsewhere recorded; Mrs. Annie Etheridge, of th
ce of about twenty miles, over a rough road, and in the common freight-cars. A train generally arrived at White House at nine P. M., and another at two A. M. In order to prepare for the reception of the sick and wounded, Mr. Olmstead, with Drs. Jenkins and Ware, had pitched, by the side of the railway, at White House, a large number of tents, to shelter and feed the convalescent. These tents were their only shelter while waiting to be shipped. Among them was one used as a kitchen and work-ro nights that I observed the working of the system, about seven hundred sick and wounded were provided with quarters and ministered to in all their wants with a tender solicitude and skill that excited my deepest admiration. To see Drs. Ware and Jenkins, lantern in hand, passing through the trains, selecting the sick with reference to their necessities, and the ladies following to assuage the thirst, or arouse, by judiciously administered stimulants, the failing strength of the brave and uncomp
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