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Thorndike (search for this): chapter 6
probabilities of an historical novel. The Gigman allusion is to Carlyle's afterwards hackneyed phrase about the respectability that keeps a gig. It is possible that the entertainment may have occurred just before her actual removal to Providence. Last night I took my boldest peep into the Gigman world of Boston. I have not been to a large party before, and only seen said world in half-boots; so I thought, as it was an occasion in which I felt real interest, to wit, a fete given by Mrs. Thorndike for my beautiful Susan, I would look at it for once in satin slippers. Dr. Channing meant to go, but was too weary when the hour came. I spent the early part of the evening in reading bits of Dante with him, and talking about the material sublime till half-past 9, when I went with Mrs. C. and graceful Mary. It was very pretty to look at. So many fair maidens dressed as if they had stepped out of their grandmothers' picture frames, and youths with their long locks, suitable to represen
J. W. Von Goethe (search for this): chapter 6
what man of intellectual pursuits, looking back on the struggles of his own early years, can throw a stone at Margaret Fuller? Providence, 1st March, 1838. My dear friend,--Many a Zelterian A phrase suggested by the correspondence between Goethe and Zelter, which she had been reading. epistle have I mentally addressed to you, full of sprightly scraps about the books I have read, the spectacles I have seen, and the attempts at men and women with whom I have come in contact. But I have noroism. Let me have these two lectures, at any rate, to read while in Boston. But her prediction was fulfilled; if she followed her literary longings she must leave Providence, and so she did. Mr. Ripley had suggested to her to write a life of Goethe, but it ended in a translation of Eckermann's Conversations with that great man, prefaced by one of her Dial essays on the subject and published in Ripley's series of Specimens of German authors, probably without compensation. Her plans and purp
Hiram Fuller (search for this): chapter 6
which Margaret Fuller was to teach at Providence was the Green Street Academy, founded by Colonel Hiram Fuller, a gentleman in no way her relative. He was a person of some force of character and a good deal of ambition, who perhaps showed both qualities in inviting Miss Fuller to be his assistant. She wrote of him to Miss Peabody: Mr. Fuller is as unlike as possible to Mr. Alcott. He has Mr. Fuller is as unlike as possible to Mr. Alcott. He has neither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alcott's diary, was a liberal one for those days, and I am assured by Miss Jacobs, who followed Miss FullerMiss Fuller in the school, that the thousand dollars were undoubtedly paid, though Horace Greeley, in his Recollections, states the contrary. Mr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to NewMr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to New York and became connected with the New York Mirror, edited by N. P. Willis and George P. Morris. This he abandoned after a time, being tired, as he said, of supporting two poets, and was afterwards
t before her actual removal to Providence. Last night I took my boldest peep into the Gigman world of Boston. I have not been to a large party before, and only seen said world in half-boots; so I thought, as it was an occasion in which I felt real interest, to wit, a fete given by Mrs. Thorndike for my beautiful Susan, I would look at it for once in satin slippers. Dr. Channing meant to go, but was too weary when the hour came. I spent the early part of the evening in reading bits of Dante with him, and talking about the material sublime till half-past 9, when I went with Mrs. C. and graceful Mary. It was very pretty to look at. So many fair maidens dressed as if they had stepped out of their grandmothers' picture frames, and youths with their long locks, suitable to represent pages if not nobles. Signor Figaro was there also in propria [persona] la et al. And Daniel the Great, not, however, when I saw him, engaged in an operation peculiarly favorable to his style of beauty,
Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 6
of character and a good deal of ambition, who perhaps showed both qualities in inviting Miss Fuller to be his assistant. She wrote of him to Miss Peabody: Mr. Fuller is as unlike as possible to Mr. Alcott. He has neither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alcott's diary, was a liberal one for those days, and I am assured by Miss Jacobs, who followed Miss Fuller in the school, that the thousand dollars were undoubtedly paid, though Horace Greeley, in his Recollections, states the contrary. Mr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to New York and became connected with the New York Mirror, edited by N. P. Willis and George P. Morris. This he abandoned after a time, being tired, as he said, of supporting two poets, and was afterwards editor of the London Cosmopolitan. In addition to his bold choice of an assistant, he invoked the rising prestige of Ralph Waldo Emerson, inviting him to give an address at the de
George P. Morris (search for this): chapter 6
ott. He has neither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alcott's diary, was a liberal one for those days, and I am assured by Miss Jacobs, who followed Miss Fuller in the school, that the thousand dollars were undoubtedly paid, though Horace Greeley, in his Recollections, states the contrary. Mr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to New York and became connected with the New York Mirror, edited by N. P. Willis and George P. Morris. This he abandoned after a time, being tired, as he said, of supporting two poets, and was afterwards editor of the London Cosmopolitan. In addition to his bold choice of an assistant, he invoked the rising prestige of Ralph Waldo Emerson, inviting him to give an address at the dedication of the Academy (Saturday, June 10, 1837), and suggesting to him, he being still in the ministry, to bring sermons and preach in the two Unitarian churches. Margaret Fuller was ill for a time after
Charles Emerson (search for this): chapter 6
re true than now. After her father's death she must seek a shorter path to self-support than was to be found in those alluring ways of literature and philosophy which she would have much preferred. An opening offered itself in the school of Mr. A. B. Alcott, in Boston, where Miss Elizabeth P. Peabody had been previously employed. Mr. Alcott's unpublished diary gives the successive steps in the negotiation and enables me to present the beginning and the end together. 1836, August 2d. Emerson called this morning and took me to Concord to pass the day. At his house I met Margaret Fuller (I had seen her once before this), and had some conversation with her about taking Miss Peabody's place in my school. December 17th. I have seen M. F., who, besides giving instruction in the languages, will report The conversations on the Gospels as they proceed. 1837, January 8th. I resume the Conversations, which have been suspended since last July. Subject, The sermon on the Mount, f
J. P. Eckermann (search for this): chapter 6
, I dare say, better than most persons you see. But perhaps you do not need to see anybody, for you are acting, and nobly. If so, you need not come yourself, but send me your two lectures on Holiness and Heroism. Let me have these two lectures, at any rate, to read while in Boston. But her prediction was fulfilled; if she followed her literary longings she must leave Providence, and so she did. Mr. Ripley had suggested to her to write a life of Goethe, but it ended in a translation of Eckermann's Conversations with that great man, prefaced by one of her Dial essays on the subject and published in Ripley's series of Specimens of German authors, probably without compensation. Her plans and purposes on retiring from her school are best stated in a letter to the Rev. W. H. Channing, not before published :-- Providence, 9th December, 1838. I am on the point of leaving Providence, and I do so with unfeigned delight, not only because I am weary and want rest, because my mind has so
Ralph Waldo Emerson (search for this): chapter 6
be prosecuted for blasphemy, as Abner Kneeland had lately been. To this Mr. R. W. Emerson wrote an indignant reply, asserting that Mr. Alcott's only offense lay inon to his bold choice of an assistant, he invoked the rising prestige of Ralph Waldo Emerson, inviting him to give an address at the dedication of the Academy (Satur Margaret Fuller was ill for a time after reaching Providence, and wrote to Mr. Emerson in June, 1837: Concord, dear Concord, haven of repose, where headache, vertito Boston, and it may be well to insert a passage from one of her letters to Mr. Emerson, in which she gives a glimpse of the gay world of that city forty-seven yeae been with this reminiscence in her mind. On March 1, 1838, she wrote to Mr. Emerson one of her most characteristic letters. I reproduce it from the manuscript, because it shows what Mr. Emerson was to her,--a saint in her oratory,--and because it puts what was often called, in her case, self-consciousness and vanity, in th
J. T. Buckingham (search for this): chapter 6
ed this wrath to the highest point. The books and the school were bitterly denounced by the Daily Advertiser and Courier, the latter seriously urging that Mr. Alcott should be prosecuted for blasphemy, as Abner Kneeland had lately been. To this Mr. R. W. Emerson wrote an indignant reply, asserting that Mr. Alcott's only offense lay in his efforts to make children think, and that his experiment was one in which all the friends of education were interested. The editor of the Courier, Mr. J. T. Buckingham, rejoined by quoting the opinion of a Harvard professor that one third of Mr. Alcott's book was absurd, one third was blasphemous, and one third was obscene. Biographical Sketch of A. B. Alcott, p. 15. Such was the hornet's nest into which Margaret Fuller had unwarily plunged herself by following the very mildest-mannered saint who ever tried his hand at the spiritual training of children. With what discrimination she viewed the whole affair — how well she saw defects on the pr
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