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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ng speeches have let down its courage, who can be sure that even Seward's voice, if he retain the wish, can conjure up again such a North as stands face to face with Southern arrogance to-day? The Union, then, is a failure. What harm can come from disunion, and what good? The seceding States will form a Southern Confederacy. We may judge of its future from the history of Mexico. The Gulf States intend to reopen the slave-trade. If Kentucky and Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina secede, the opening of that trade will ruin them, and they will gravitate to us, free. Louisiana cannot secede, except on paper; the omnipotent West needs her territory, as the mouth of its river. She must stay with us as a State or a conquered province, and may have her choice. [Laughter.] Beside, she stands on sugar, and free-trade bankrupts her. Consider the rest of the Slave States as one power, how can it harm us? Let us see the ground of Mr. Seward's fears. Will it increase ou
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
the ground of Mr. Seward's fears. Will it increase our expenses or lessen our receipts? No; every one of those States costs the Union more than it contributes to it. Can it harm us by attacks? States without commerce or manufactures, and with an army of four millions of natural enemies encamped among them, have given bonds to keep the peace. Will they leave us so small and weak by going that we cannot stand alone? Let us see. There is no reason to suppose that the Free States, except California, will not cling together. Idem velle, idem nolle,--to like and dislike the same things, says the Latin proverb, is friendship. When a great number of persons agree in a great number of things, that insures a union; that is not the case with the North and South, therefore we separate, that is the case with the whole North, therefore we shall remain united. How strong shall we be? Our territory will be twice as large as Austria, three times as large as France, four times as large as Spa
Hudson River (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
jority intend. I reconcile thus the utter difference and opposition of his campaign speeches, and his last one. I think he went West, sore at the loss of the nomination, but with too much good sense, perhaps magnanimity, to act over again Webster's sullen part when Taylor stole his rights. Still, Mr. Seward, though philosophic, though keen to analyze and unfold the theory of our politics, is not cunning in plans. He is only the hand and tongue; his brain lives in private life on the Hudson River side. Acting under that guidance, he thought Mr. Lincoln not likely to go beyond, even if he were able to keep, the whole Chicago platform. Accordingly, he said: I will give free rein to my natural feelings and real convictions, till these Abolitionists of the Republican ranks shall cry, O what a mistake! We ought to have nominated Seward; another time we will not be balked. Hence the hot eloquence and fearless tone of those prairie speeches. He returns to Washington, finds Mr. Lin
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 18
s long ago as 1789! Mr. Seward would leave New York united to New Orleans, with the hope (sure to be balked) of getting freer and freer from year to year. I want to place her, at once, in the same relation towards New Orleans that she bears to Liverpool. You can do it, the moment you break the political tie. What will that do? I will tell you. The New York pulpit is to-day one end of a magnetic telegraph, of which the New Orleans cotton-market is the other. The New York stock-market is one still have a common language, a common faith, and common race, the same common social life; we shall intermarry just the same; we shall have steamers running just as often and just as rapidly as now. But what cares Dr. Dewey for the opinion of Liverpool? Nothing What cares he for the opinion of Washington? Everything! Break the link, and New York springs up like the fountain relieved from a mountain load, and assumes her place among decent cities. I mean no special praise of the English cou
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
cover our Atlantic coast, and in ten days Massachusetts and Carolina will stand shoulder to should is all our Revolution directly taught us. Massachusetts was hide-bound in the aristocracy of classe better than a negro. The five points of Massachusetts decency were, to trace your lineage to thele he does, South Carolina hates and fears Massachusetts. [Applause.] No Congressional resolves cabeen too indifferent even to remonstrate. Massachusetts, who once remonstrated, saw her own agent g navy,--for what? to protect Michigan or Massachusetts, New York or Ohio? No; there is not a natr disunited. It matters not to me whether Massachusetts is worth one thousand millions, as now, ors what I mean by disunion. I mean to take Massachusetts, and leave her exactly as she is, commercich now rests upon it. What I would do with Massachusetts is this: I would make her, in relation to toddle bringing chips from the wood-pile,--Massachusetts only pays her own board aid lodging, and l[1 more...]
Eureka, Woodford County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
nd the Essex Junto. Today, Massachusetts only holds to the lips of Carolina a beaker of the same beverage I know no man who has analyzed this passage in our history so well as Richard Hildreth. The last thirty years have been the flowering out of this lesson. The Democratic principle, crumbling classes into men, has been working down from pulpits and judges' seats, through shop-boards and shoe-benches, to Irish hodmen, and reached the negro at last. The long toil of a century cries out, Eureka!-I have found it! -the diamond of an immortal soul and an equal manhood under a black skin as truly as under a white one. For this, Leggett labored and Lovejoy died. For this, the bravest soul of the century went up to God from a Virginia scaffold. [Hisses and applause.] For this, young men gave up their May of youth, and old men the honors and ease of age. It went through the land writing history afresh, setting up and pulling down parties, riving sects, mowing down colossal reputations,
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
eenth century. That is what we mean by Disunion! That is my coercion! Northern pulpits cannonading the Southern conscience; Northern competition emptying its pockets; educated slaves awaking its fears; civilization and Christianity beckoning the South into their sisterhood. Soon every breeze that sweeps over Carolina will bring to our ears the music of repentance, and even she will carve on her Palmetto, We hold this truth to be self-evident, -that all men are created equal. All hail, then, Disunion! Beautiful on the mountains are the feet of Him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace, that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth. The sods of Bunker Hill shall be greener, now that their great purpose is accomplished. Sleep in peace, martyr of Harper's Ferry!--your life was not given in vain. Rejoice: spirits of Fayette and Kosciusko!--the only stain upon your swords is passing away. Soon, throughout all America. there shall be neither power nor wish to hold a slave
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
uppose the Union means wealth, culture, happiness, and safety, man has no right to buy either by crime. Many years ago, on the floor of Congress, Kentucky and Tennessee both confessed that the dissolution of the Union was the dissolution of slavery. Last month, Senator Johnson of Tennessee said: If I were an Abolitionist, and wTennessee said: If I were an Abolitionist, and wanted to accomplish the abolition of slavery in the Southern States, the first step I would take would be to break the bonds of this Union. I believe the continuance of slavery depends on the preservation of this Union, and a compliance with all the guaranties of the Constitution. In September last (at La Crosse), Mr. Seward himstes will form a Southern Confederacy. We may judge of its future from the history of Mexico. The Gulf States intend to reopen the slave-trade. If Kentucky and Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina secede, the opening of that trade will ruin them, and they will gravitate to us, free. Louisiana cannot secede, except o
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ience, and kneeling speeches have let down its courage, who can be sure that even Seward's voice, if he retain the wish, can conjure up again such a North as stands face to face with Southern arrogance to-day? The Union, then, is a failure. What harm can come from disunion, and what good? The seceding States will form a Southern Confederacy. We may judge of its future from the history of Mexico. The Gulf States intend to reopen the slave-trade. If Kentucky and Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina secede, the opening of that trade will ruin them, and they will gravitate to us, free. Louisiana cannot secede, except on paper; the omnipotent West needs her territory, as the mouth of its river. She must stay with us as a State or a conquered province, and may have her choice. [Laughter.] Beside, she stands on sugar, and free-trade bankrupts her. Consider the rest of the Slave States as one power, how can it harm us? Let us see the ground of Mr. Seward's fears. Wi
France (France) (search for this): chapter 18
ognize soberly the nature and necessity of our position? Why not, like statesmen, remember that homogeneous nations like France tend to centralization; confederacies like ours tend inevitably to dismemberment? France is the slow, still deposit of aFrance is the slow, still deposit of ages on central granite; only the globe's convulsion can rive it! We are the rich mud of the Mississippi; every flood shifts it from one side to the other of the channel. Nations like Austria, victim states, held under the lock and key of despotism,e shall remain united. How strong shall we be? Our territory will be twice as large as Austria, three times as large as France, four times as large as Spain, six times as large as Italy, seven times as large as Great Britain. Those nations have prr yet felt, having shirked it on to the North; quicken other cotton-fields into greater activity by the unwillingness of France and England to trust their supply to States convulsed by political quarrels;--and then see if, in such circumstances, the
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