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Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
oice against the evil thing whenever occasion offered. July 7. Oak Glen.... my son and his wife came over from Bristol to pass the day. Hea. I suppose it to mean indifference and indolence.... To Laura Oak Glen, September 6, 1899. . . here's a question. Houghton and Miffli September 7. have attacked my proofs fiercely.... To Laura Oak Glen, September 16, 1899. yours received, tres chere. why not consuleautiful summer and autumn. Amen. she was never ready to leave Oak Glen; the town house always seemed at first like a prison. October 2me in this record; she never spoke of it to any of her family.] Oak Glen. June 21. here I am seated once more at my old table, beginning ain the green parlor, which was pretty and pleasant. .. to Laura Oak Glen, August 3, 1900. ... I grieve for the death of King Umberto, asorted me much in the forlorn exchange of my lovely surroundings at Oak Glen for the imprisonment of a town house. November 4. 241 Beacon St
. .. November 19 ... before the sermon I had prayed for some good thought of God. This came to me in the shape of a sudden perception to this effect: I am in the father's house already. . . . November 30. ... in giving thanks to-day, I made my only personal petitions, which were first, that some of my dear granddaughters might find suitable husbands,... and lastly, that I might serve in some way until the last breath leaves my body.... December 16. I had greatly desired to see the Barber. kind Mrs. [Alfred] Batcheller made it possible by inviting me to go with her. The performance was almost if not quite bouffe. Sembrich's singing marvellous, the acting of the other characters excellent, and singing very good, especially that of de Reszke and Campanari. I heard the opera in New York more than seventy years ago, when Malibran, then Signorina Garcia, took the part of Rosina. December 31. ... Advertiser man came with a query: what event in 1899 will have the greatest infl
Richard Watson Gilder (search for this): chapter 28
mostly of the ladies of his family --Emerson's mother and his wife. Said also, Emerson was as great in what he did not say as in what he said. Second-class talent tells the whole story, reasons everything out; great genius suggests even more than it says. she was already what she used to call Boston's old spoiled child! all through the Birthday flowers, letters, and telegrams poured into the house. From among the tokens of love and reverence May be chosen the quatrain sent by Richard Watson Gilder:--how few have rounded out so full a life! Priestess of righteous war and holy peace, poet and sage, friend, sister, mother, wife, long be it ere that noble heart shall cease! the Woman's Journal issued a special Birthday number. It was a lovely and heart-warming anniversary, the pleasure of which long remained with her. among the guests was the beloved physician of many years, William P. Wesselhoeft. Looking round on the thronged and flower-decked rooms, he said, this is al
Oliver Wendell Holmes (search for this): chapter 28
, will that woman hold her tongue! fifty years in Boston schooled, still I find her rhyme-befooled. oft in earnest, oft in jest, we have met and tried our best. Nought I dread an open field, I can conquer, I can yield, self from foes I can defend, but Heav'n preserve us from our friend! “ she and her chief vice were always making merry together; when their flint and steel struck, the flash was laughter. It May have been at the Authors' Club that the two, with Edward Everett Hale and Dr. Holmes, were receiving compliments and tributes one afternoon. at least, she cried, no one can say that Boston drops its H's this was in the winter of 1900. it was the time of the Boer War, and all Christendom was sorrowing over the conflict. On January 3 the Journal says: this morning before rising, I had a sudden thought of the Christ-babe standing between the two armies, Boers and Britons, on Christmas day. I have devoted the morning to an effort to overtake the heavenly vision
Salome Campello (search for this): chapter 28
foolishly. February 4. wrote a careful letter to W. F. Savage. He had written, asking an explanation of some old manuscript copy of my Battle Hymn and of the theft perpetrated of three of its verses in pen pictures of the War, only lately brought to my notice. He evidently thought these matters implied doubt at least of my having composed the Hymn. to this suspicion I did not allude, but showed him how the verses stolen had been altered, probably to avoid detection... March 3. Count di Campello's lecture, on the religious life in Italy, was most interesting. His uncle's movement in founding a National Italian Catholic Church seemed to me to present the first solution I have met with, of the absolute opposition between Catholic and Protestant. A Catholicism without spiritual tyranny, without ignorant superstition, would bridge over the interval between the two opposites and bring about the unification of the worldchurch.... March 13.... passed the whole morning at State
a view to prolonged life, since without this outlook, it is very hard for us to endeavor or to do our best. Peace be with you, beautiful summer and autumn. Amen. she was never ready to leave Oak Glen; the town house always seemed at first like a prison. October 23. Boston. a drizzly, dark day. I struggled out twice, saying to myself: it is for your life. . .. October 24. have had two days of chaos and discouragement. .. . October 27. a delightful and encouraging Conference of A. Aw. Held in my parlors. The prevailing feeling was that we should not disband, but should hold on to our association and lie by, hoping to find New innings for work. Florida was spoken of as good ground for us. I felt much cheered and quickened by the renewal of old friendships. ... a Western lecture trip had been planned for this autumn, but certain untoward symptoms developed and Dr. Wesselhoeft said, no! no! not even if you had not had vertigo. she gave it up most reluctantly, confidi
earnest, oft in jest, we have met and tried our best. Nought I dread an open field, I can conquer, I can yield, self from foes I can defend, but Heav'n preserve us from our friend! “ she and her chief vice were always making merry together; when their flint and steel struck, the flash was laughter. It May have been at the Authors' Club that the two, with Edward Everett Hale and Dr. Holmes, were receiving compliments and tributes one afternoon. at least, she cried, no one can say that Boston drops its H's this was in the winter of 1900. it was the time of the Boer War, and all Christendom was sorrowing over the conflict. On January 3 the Journal says: this morning before rising, I had a sudden thought of the Christ-babe standing between the two armies, Boers and Britons, on Christmas day. I have devoted the morning to an effort to overtake the heavenly vision with but a mediocre result. these lines are published in at Sunset. on the 11th the cap and bells are a
Paul Dunbar (search for this): chapter 28
hout payment, a very mean proceeding... . March 21. Tuskegee benefit, Hollis Street Theatre. this meeting scored a triumph, not only for the performers, but for the race. Bishop Lawrence presided with much good grace and appreciation. Paul Dunbar was the least distinct. Professor Dubois, of Atlanta University, read a fine and finished discourse. Booker Washington was eloquent as usual, and the Hampton quartet was delightful. At the tea which followed at Mrs. Whitman's studio, I spoke with these men and with Dunbar's wife, a nearly white Woman of refined appearance. I asked Dubois about the negro vote in the South. He thought it better to have it legally taken away than legally nullified. April 17. Kindergarten for the Blind .... I hoped for a good word to say, but could only think of Shakespeare's the evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones, intending to say that this does not commend itself to me as true. Mr. Eels spoke before m
Sarah Whitman (search for this): chapter 28
us getting my ideas without payment, a very mean proceeding... . March 21. Tuskegee benefit, Hollis Street Theatre. this meeting scored a triumph, not only for the performers, but for the race. Bishop Lawrence presided with much good grace and appreciation. Paul Dunbar was the least distinct. Professor Dubois, of Atlanta University, read a fine and finished discourse. Booker Washington was eloquent as usual, and the Hampton quartet was delightful. At the tea which followed at Mrs. Whitman's studio, I spoke with these men and with Dunbar's wife, a nearly white Woman of refined appearance. I asked Dubois about the negro vote in the South. He thought it better to have it legally taken away than legally nullified. April 17. Kindergarten for the Blind .... I hoped for a good word to say, but could only think of Shakespeare's the evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones, intending to say that this does not commend itself to me as true. M
William P. Wesselhoeft (search for this): chapter 28
It was a lovely and heart-warming anniversary, the pleasure of which long remained with her. among the guests was the beloved physician of many years, William P. Wesselhoeft. Looking round on the thronged and flower-decked rooms, he said, this is all very fine, Mrs. Howe; but on your ninetieth Birthday I shall come, and nobod and quickened by the renewal of old friendships. ... a Western lecture trip had been planned for this autumn, but certain untoward symptoms developed and Dr. Wesselhoeft said, no! no! not even if you had not had vertigo. she gave it up most reluctantly, confiding only to the Journal the hope that she might be able to go lateould take pains to find out who he was. Found the key immediately. . . June 18.... the little lump in my right breast hurts me a little to-day. Have written Wesselhoeft about it. 4.50 P. M. He has seen it and says that it is probably cancerous; forbids me to think of an operation; thinks he can stop it with medicine. When he
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