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Beal's Island (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
, no, gentlemen, nor folly either! laughter resounded, as I meant it should. . . March 6. In the evening to hear Elijah finely given. Some of the music brought back to me the desolate scenery of Palestine. It is a very beautiful composition. ... The alto was frightened at first, coming out stronger in Woe unto them, and better still in Oh, rest in the Lord. The audience seemed to me sleepy and cold. I really led the applause for the alto. March 13.... Wrote to John A. Beal, of Beal's Island, offering to send instructive literature to that benighted region, where three mountebanks, pretending to teach religion, robbed the simple people and excited them to acts of frenzy. March 17. Mrs. Allen's funeral.... I had a momentary mental vision of myself in the Valley of the Shadow, with a splendid champion in full armor walking beside me, a champion sent by God to make the dread passage easy and safe .... April 2.... Learned the deaths of X. and Abby Morton Diaz. Poor X., h
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
r and Iowa], who started the Battle Hymn when they saw me approaching. This seemed to me charming. My man Michael, recognizing the tune, said: Mrs. Howe, this is a send-off for you! . . . She was going to keep a lecture engagement in Concord, Massachusetts; her theme, A century from the birth of Emerson. She was anxious about this paper, and told Mr. Sanborn (the inevitable reporter calling to borrow her manuscript) that she thought the less said about the address the better. I have triedheart of my dear friend than that I should be a guest at the Quincy Commencement. June 29. Heard to my sorrow of the death of delightful Sarah Whitman. Wrote a little screed for Woman's Journal which I sent... . In early July, she went to Concord for a memorial meeting in honor of Nathaniel Hawthorne. July 11. .... Alice Blackwell, some days ago, wrote beseeching me to write to President Roosevelt, begging him to do something for the Armenians. I said to myself, No, I won't; I am too
ntie Francis's wedding day. I think it was in 1828. My sisters and I were bridesmaids, my brothers groomsmen. Dear father, very lame, walked up with a cane to give her away. Grandma Cutler looked much discontented with the match. Father sent the pair off in his own carriage, with four horses, their manes and tails braided with white ribbons. They drove part of the way to Philadelphia. November 28.... To Wellesley College.... William Butler Yeats lectured on the revival of letters in Ireland. We dined with him afterwards at Miss Hazard's house. He is a man of fiery temperament, with a slight, boyish figure: has deep-set blue eyes and dark hair; reminds me of John O'Sullivan Hawthorne's friend of the Democratic Review. in his temperament; is certainly, as Grandpa Ward said of the Red Revolutionists, with whom he dined in the days of the French Revolution, very warm. November 29 .... This came into my mind, apropos of reformers generally: Dost thou so carry thy light as
The Hague (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 30
that I had to ask leave for a word, and spoke of justice as that without which peace cannot be had.... I said:-- Mr. President and dear friends, assembled in the blessed cause of Peace, let me remind you that there is one word even more holy than peace, namely, justice. It is anterior in our intellectual perceptions. The impulse which causes men to contend against injustice is a divine one, deeply implanted in the human breast. It would be wrong to attempt to thwart it. I hope that The Hague Tribunal will bear in mind that it is sacredly pledged to maintain justice. The brightest intellects, the most profound study, should be devoted to the promotion of this end. The Greek bishop met me in the ante-room and said, We always pray for you. . . . October 9. I have felt more strongly than ever of late that God is the only comforter ... These great serious things were always present to work for in days in which I exerted myself to amuse others and myself too. It is quite true t
South Berwick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
k. Yes! my strong friend, my heart said, I will abide in thee, and a bit of the old Easter anthem came back to me, He sitteth at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father. No, it is a verse of the Te Deum. In October a lecture in South Berwick gave her the opportunity, always greatly enjoyed, of a visit to Sarah Orne Jewett and her sister Mary. November 1. South Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hamilton House described bSouth Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hamilton House described by Sarah in her Tory Lover. . . . Most interesting. Mrs. Tyson very cordial and delightful..... She came over later to dinner and we had such a pleasant time! In afternoon copied most of my screed for the Boston Globe. It surely was not on this occasion that she described dinner as a thing of courses and remorses! November 2. Took reluctant leave of the Jewett house and the trio, Sarah, Mary, and Annie Fields. We had a wonderful dish of pigeons for lunch .... It was delightful to see
Madison City (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
eft me very lonely and forlorn. To-day, as I thought it all over, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob seemed to come back to me; the God of Christ, and his saints and martyrs. I said to myself: Let me be steeped in the devotion of the Psalms, and of Paul's Epistles! I took up Coquerel's sermons on the Lord's Prayer, simple, beautiful, positive. . .. July 30. Oak Glen. Rose at 6.15 A. M. and had good luck in dressing quickly. With dear Flossy took 9 A. M. train for Boston. At Middletown station found the teachers from the West [Denver and Iowa], who started the Battle Hymn when they saw me approaching. This seemed to me charming. My man Michael, recognizing the tune, said: Mrs. Howe, this is a send-off for you! . . . She was going to keep a lecture engagement in Concord, Massachusetts; her theme, A century from the birth of Emerson. She was anxious about this paper, and told Mr. Sanborn (the inevitable reporter calling to borrow her manuscript) that she thought the less
William Shakespeare (search for this): chapter 30
ut ordained, too, to be overcome by the onward impulse which creates worlds, life, and civilization. Said it was this inertia which opposed suffrage, the dread of change inherent in masses, material or moral, etc., etc. Among her winter delights were the Longy concerts of instrumental music. She writes of one:-- Was carried away by the delight of the musicall wind instruments. A trio of Handel for bassoon and two oboes was most solid and beautiful.... I could think of nothing but Shakespeare's Tempest and Midsummer Night's Dream. The thought that God had set all human life and work to music overpowered me, and coming home I had a rhapsody of thanksgiving for the wonderful gift.... The next day came an entertainment in aid of Atlanta University and Calhoun School; she enjoyed this exceedingly, especially the plantation songs, which are of profoundest pathos, mixed with overpowering humor. It was pleasant, too, to see the audience in which descendants of the old anti-slave
John A. Andrew (search for this): chapter 30
eral. Mrs. Diaz is a loss — a high-strung, public-spirited woman with an heroic history. April 4. To the carriage-drivers' ball. They sent a carriage for me and I took Mary, the maid.... Mr. Dan was waiting outside for me, as was another of the committee who troubled me much, pulling and hauling me by one arm, very superfluous. My entrance was greeted with applause, and I was led to the high seats, where were two aides of the Governor, Dewey and White, the latter of whom remembers Governor Andrew. The opening march was very good. I was taken in to supper, as were the two officers just mentioned. We had a cozy little talk. I came away at about 10.30. April 14. Mr. Butcher came to breakfast at nine o'clock. He told me about the man Toynbee, whom he had known well. He talked also about Greeks and Hebrews, the animosity of race which kept them apart until the flourishing of the Alexandrian school, when the Jews greedily absorbed the philosophy of the Greeks. This was Mr.
ion itself. I had almost a spasm of thankfulness to Almighty God for the opportunity to speak for such a cause at such a time. At the suffrage hearing soon after, she spoke of the force of inertia as divinely ordained and necessary, but ordained, too, to be overcome by the onward impulse which creates worlds, life, and civilization. Said it was this inertia which opposed suffrage, the dread of change inherent in masses, material or moral, etc., etc. Among her winter delights were the Longy concerts of instrumental music. She writes of one:-- Was carried away by the delight of the musicall wind instruments. A trio of Handel for bassoon and two oboes was most solid and beautiful.... I could think of nothing but Shakespeare's Tempest and Midsummer Night's Dream. The thought that God had set all human life and work to music overpowered me, and coming home I had a rhapsody of thanksgiving for the wonderful gift.... The next day came an entertainment in aid of Atlanta Unive
roubles, Lit by some irradiant bubbles Which became prismatic opals in the sun that never sets. Picnics have we held together Sailing in the summer weather, Sitting low to taste the chowder on the sands of Newport Bay, And that wonderful charade, sir, You know well, sir, that you made, sir, When so many years of earnest did invite an hour of play. He shall rank now with the sages Who survive in classic pages, English, German, French and Latin, Greek, so weary to construe; Did he con his Epictetus Ere he came to-night to greet us? He, dw/ristos in reverence, among the learned few. He may climb no more the mountain, But he still employs the fountain Pen from whose incisive point pure Helicon may flow, And his “Yesterdays” so cheerful Charm the world so wild and tearful, And the Devil calls for copy, and he never answers “No.” Do I speak for everybody, When I utter this rhapsody, To induce our friend to keep his pace in following Life's incline; Never slacken, but come on, sir, Eight
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